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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    currently in Pto Montt, Chile
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    Good advice on the shop water.

    Sometimes I wonder about the former owners; we carry a ton of fresh water in two big stainless tanks right above the keel... so far, so good... but they are interconnected and they both feed the pressure water system and the calorifier... The only trace of the water maker is the switch for it... but Fans*ğR*ğUs...
    Rule number one or thereabouts.... turn off the pressure water when at sea....
    The bottom of my two FW tanks is at the same level as the bottom of my calorifier.... pressure pump off but 50% of my potable ended up in the bilge ... 24 hours into a 44 day passage....
    Pressure relief valve now has a 'tail' that ends a solid metre above the tanks....
    Being able to isolate your tanks is just standard big ship practice... as you know...
    I have no gauges... when one tank is empty I know I have 50% left.... I'm good at sums

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Caribbean
    Posts
    2,273

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    Good advice on the shop water.

    Sometimes I wonder about the former owners; we carry a ton of fresh water in two big stainless tanks right above the keel... so far, so good... but they are interconnected and they both feed the pressure water system and the calorifier... The only trace of the water maker is the switch for it... but Fans*ğR*ğUs...
    We have pressurised water feeding calorifier. We also have an alarm on the main bilge pump. If the pump runs, so does the alarm. We only get worried when the alarm does go off. It activates when a cup of water builds up in the main sump. We could never be in a position that half our water ends up in the bilges without knowing well in advance. We never buy water in lpastic cans from a shop. We care about the envirnoment. We dont want to be responsible for the millions of plastic bottles on the shore of islands, killing wildife and polluted out oceans. We try not to buy and food in styrene packaging for the same reason. Lots of the poorest countries have no refuse collection. Plastic gets burnt or thrown in to the sea. Dont add to the problem

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,722

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    "Bluewater boat" used to mean a heavy long-keel ketch, possibly steel. Now it's often just any modern boat with a few extra bits of kit, and a satphone to call for help. In truth either can be suitable: the key factor is the crew skill/knowledge/determination.

    Have personally been glad of plenty of bottled water well offshore after a tank problem.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlantic
    Posts
    19,722

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    Ive never sailed ocean stuff on a yacht with a watermaker. Its never been an issue though because I always stock up massively on bottled water. 5L to decant from, lots of 1.5L spread around and a few 0.5 L to fit in a fridge....if there is one.

    Salt water pump is good for washing up, beats a bucket, mostly.

    Tip. Use an old spray bottleof some sort, suitably rinsed, filled with fresh water to rinse plates and cookware. Works a treat.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    SPAIN,Galicia
    Posts
    12,451

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    There speaks a man who knows his Onions!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Caribbean
    Posts
    2,273

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    I dont think the main benefit of a watemaker is in crossing oceans. Its more about living aboard in locations where water is harder to get and of unknown quality or poor quality. If you want to be off the beaten track then the watermaker makes a difference. If you go in to marinas in popular places then you could suvive without a watermaker. 2 months on the south coast of Cuba where getting potable water was impossible is an example. Offlying islands of the Bahamas and in San Blas you couldnt get water. In San Blas we made water for the locals as they were short of good drinking water.

    If you spend a month at sea doing one of the longer passages in the Pacific then assuming you use 5 gallons per day you need to carry over 700 litres. We can do this in our main tank no problem without bottles. We would of course carry emergency water in jerry cans but we would likely make water onroute, wash pans in fresh water, takes a shower, do some washing, etc being ruffty tufty is fine if you like to camp. It gets tedious.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    The Known Universe
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    Much thanks for all replies , Keplie yes I forgot about satphone will be installing Iridium Go for weather and saftey , not sure SSB is the future
    Water is an issue and I dont mean to be negative to bottled water , it is sensible to have water out with the tanks , but as a hardened enviromentalist married to a Dr of Science dealing with Climate change , the issue of plastic always comes up and how do we reduce our footprint, we take our plastic and then give it to a Island that might not have the resources to recycle it .
    Is potable water in jerry cans better .

    Good shade is a must
    I like the idea of a wind vane but 5 to 6 k must make a second auto pilot more feasable
    Looking at around 500 w of solar this is without needing to fit a Frame at the back I appreciate wind Turbines are less energy efficent and work poor down wind , but do they add to power as through the night they work if the wind is a blowing

    Does any one out there cruising use any form of Air condtioning or is this just another pleasure that is nice but not really needed

    thank all
    Flying birds have no master

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlantic
    Posts
    19,722

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    For energy generation, try Watt @ Sea. Obviously poor at low boat speed but generally excellent. Pricey but worth it.

    Mixing wind, solar and water power provides lots of alternates.

    You can use a lot less than 5 gallons a day for Glamping! In my experience of the Pacific......

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Keswick, Cumbria
    Posts
    1,816

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    I cant imagine ever relying solely on autopilots for ocean crossings, I think I would rather have a windvane than epirb & liferaft!

    But then I have never crossed one, so it's just an opinion, not experience.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopefully somewhere warm
    Posts
    9,247

    Default Re: Define Bluewater

    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingGoose View Post
    not sure SSB is the future
    SSB receive is a personal must for offshore to get weatherfax charts. Doesn't have to cost much though, you could probably get something for well under a hundred quid and decode the images on a tablet/laptop.
    Wfax is great, free and see the big picture of what's going on.

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