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Thread: Chum

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    38,090

    Default Re: Chum

    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    A lead sash window weight works fine and doesn't cost much.
    We use the iron ones on racing marks.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,616

    Default Re: Chum

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyInBed View Post
    Is this just a rant?
    What makes you think that...?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
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    5,460

    Default Re: Chum

    Quote Originally Posted by vyv_cox View Post
    Haha!
    At the full allowable 15 kg the weight is just over 10 metres of 8 mm chain. Anchorages are increasingly crowded but most will accommodate 10 metres more chain.
    +1

    Jonathan

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
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    5,460

    Default Re: Chum

    We, all, use chain because it is abrasion resistant and because the catenary offers the ability to 'absorb' the energy of the moving yacht (yawing and horseing). In the off chance one cannot deploy more chain use of a sensible snubber will allow an alternative to adding more chain.

    Purely as an example. A 10m x 10mm nylon snubber has a similar ability to absorb energy as 30m of 10mm chain at a 5:1 scope upto about 300kg of rode tension. Beyond that tension the chain has effectively reached its limit of energy absorbing value (its looking straight). The nylon will continue to stretch (almost linearly) - until it fails. It depends on weight of rope, rather than diameter (and rope construction), but think of failure at around 1.5t - and I know I'm ignoring WLL.

    In normal circumstances my example might not be sensible (at all) - I might suggest a heavier duty snubber be paired with the 10mm chain. We now use 30m snubbers (for each arm of a bridle).

    Despite the advantages of nylon, or a snubber, as part of the rode I simply do not see people using sensible lengths of nylon as part of the rode. In fact I often see rode deployed with no snubber at all - though they might deploy 'chums' or 'angels' I have not noticed.

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 04-06-19 at 18:49.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,771

    Default Re: Chum

    They can stuff the Jimmy Green offering.

    My 22' reasonable performance boat would be crucified if I had an all chain rode, so I have a 7.5kg Bruce anchor ( worked very well for 41 years, lets not get into that argument ) with 3 metres of relatively heavy 1/4" chain to avoid abrasion on the seabed and help keep the angle of pull low, and 30 metres of 14mm nylon warp.

    I also carry a 7kg folding grapnel kedge, which has various uses unlike a dead weight.

    Usually I lower it in smooth folded state halfway down the bower warp if anchoring for any time or overnight; this prevents the boat ' sailing the anchor ' and getting the rode wrapped beside the keel in light wind over tide conditions, and helps keep the angle of pull on the anchor lower - I've tried this in gales and am certain it helps.

    The other benefit of carrying a folding grapnel is it will hopefully penetrate weed and get a toe-hold on rock, in an emergency where one would not be chosing to anchor.

    The folding grapnel relies on a relatively weak pivot pin though, so I regard it as only giving breathing time in such a stiuation, not an overnight solution !
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,616

    Default Re: Chum

    Is it only 'seahorse' who's twigged this is just another 'anchor rankle' - but in disguise....?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,771

    Default Re: Chum

    I think the subject of Angels / Chums is worth a discussion, for my purposes on a mostly rope rode I think they're very useful.

    However as weight is the enemy of any boat I do think dedicated lumps like the OP's are best painted and plonked on a lawn, my grapnel is multi-purpose.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shoreham - up the river without a paddle.
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Chum

    I have a single link of ~3" chain. I use it on the stern mooring line to keep the quarter close to the jetty to which the boat is moored while allowing for tide, wash, etc.

    I wouldn't spend £160 on a bag for it though.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,460

    Default Re: Chum

    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    I think the subject of Angels / Chums is worth a discussion, for my purposes on a mostly rope rode I think they're very useful.

    However as weight is the enemy of any boat I do think dedicated lumps like the OP's are best painted and plonked on a lawn, my grapnel is multi-purpose.
    I'd agree

    We carry spare anchors and short lengths of chain (to put round trees or rocks). I cannot see the reasoning behind carrying single use ballast a kg of lead is (oddly) the same value of a kg of aluminium anchor or even a kg of chain.

    But then maybe people don't carry spare anchors (nor have the need for shore lines) and don't believe in snubbers.

    Each to their own.

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 05-06-19 at 17:07.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,334

    Default Re: Chum

    “Chums” , “angels” or “kellets” do have their uses especially if you regularly deploy rope rode. However, these devices do not do what most people think they do. They do not substantially increase the holding especially when the weight/performance ratio is considered.

    Lead is the best material. As it is much denser a kilo of lead will have more effect than most other materials. The smaller size per kilo also makes handling easier.

    Having multiple uses for the chum makes sense, especially on smaller boats which are more likely to benefit most from the chum in the first place. I have seen a boat that had a lead chum that also doubled up as part of the overall ballast when sailing but such systems are hard to retrofit and not suitable for all designs. For most boats the most practical chum as others have indicated, is probably a spare anchor or length of chain. There is no need to spend £160.
    Last edited by noelex; 06-06-19 at 02:19.

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