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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    16

    Default Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Hi guys

    I sail on an international 8m (44 ft long classic racing boat). In our last race we were on a downwind leg on a broad reach with our symetric spi up and the wind shifted so much then we had ended up on a beam reach to make the next mark. So up goes the Genoa and down comes the spi. Well actually the spi went in the drink!

    Normally we takedown the spi on a broad reach and the Genoa shelters it and its dead easy to takedown but on a beam reach it was a nightmare.

    I'd really appreciate some advice on the best technique to get this type of takedown sorted.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by fobos8; 05-06-19 at 22:00.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    10,484

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Stretch and blow drop - as I detailed in this thread...

    http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread...eam-reach-solo
    You never know, I might be right!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Thanks flaming. Read the other thread - stretching the clew would really help the foredeck crew get their hands on the foot of the spi. The problem we had with the drop on a beam reach was that the spi was so powered up that we couldn't get to the foot.

    When you say "blow" the halyard do you mean just the first third (as normal) or the whole lot?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    10,484

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    The whole lot.
    You never know, I might be right!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,775

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Quote Originally Posted by fobos8 View Post
    Thanks flaming. Read the other thread - stretching the clew would really help the foredeck crew get their hands on the foot of the spi. The problem we had with the drop on a beam reach was that the spi was so powered up that we couldn't get to the foot.

    When you say "blow" the halyard do you mean just the first third (as normal) or the whole lot?
    You could try fastening a decent thickness line to the weather side of the companionway, looping it around the spi sheet and bringing it back to the weather rail. Upon the drop call, nobody has to leave the upwind side in order to pull the spi in and stuff it down the hole.

    It does mean that somebody has to go below and untangle this retrieval line afterwards but the timing of this can be at one's leisure.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Hi Flaming,
    I read the thread on stretch and drop. There is one point I’m not clear on.

    When you sheet on to stretch the foot and then blow the halyard, do you gather in the leech or luff and then trip the tack ?
    It reads as if you stretch the foot but then have to gather the foot in, which means you would have to trip the tack anyway
    So briefly stretching the foot seems to not achieve a great deal as you stretch it and then immediately release it.

    I’d like to give it a go as it gets a bit sketchy when you need to bear away to drop with someone to leeward ��

    Thanks for all your excellent advice
    T

    Thanks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    10,484

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    In an ideal world you've got the foot of the kite itself into the hands of your bow team. Then you blow the halyard and let the head of the kite fly out as the bow team start pulling. Then blow guy and sheet and keep pulling.
    If you cannot get the foot of the kite into the reach of the bow team, then you're going to be dropping off the lazy guy as normal, you just have to ensure that the sheet is blown, not just let go of, but actively cleared from the winch. And then also blow the guy.

    The stretch is not really about the drop itself, it's about depowering the kite on a reach to allow you to get weight off the rail without having to bear away.
    You never know, I might be right!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Thanks for that. I was thinking of it as we’re usually double handed, so the stretch just buys a bit of time.

    Move pole , sheet on, get headsail out, blow halyard, blow sheet, haul on lazy guy to get the kite down hatch.

    As apposed to, headsail out, blow tack, gather foot, blow halyard, and kite down hatch, as a normal drop.

    T

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    10,484

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    Quote Originally Posted by tsekul View Post
    Thanks for that. I was thinking of it as we’re usually double handed, so the stretch just buys a bit of time.

    Move pole , sheet on, get headsail out, blow halyard, blow sheet, haul on lazy guy to get the kite down hatch.

    As apposed to, headsail out, blow tack, gather foot, blow halyard, and kite down hatch, as a normal drop.

    T
    Pretty much, but you will also need to blow the guy (tack you keep calling it) in order to get it down.
    You never know, I might be right!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Spi takedown on beam reach technique

    We've always done it differently. Stretch the foot between sheet and brace/guy, then blow the halyard. Keep the foot stretched out, but reach over or under the stretched-out foot or up the luff, grab the guts of the kite, and start dragging the kite down. The upper portions just stay above the water, on the cushion of air that is coming under the stretched-out foot. We only ease the sheet and guy/brace when the kite is almost all packed away.'

    On very small boats, like F15s and dinghies, one can actually blow the halyard, leave the sail sheeted on, climb up to windward a few lengths, and then (if there's a lull or space to bear away after clearing the obstacle, buoy, other boat or whatever you had to leeward) just go straight back up on the halyard, easing sheet in the last few feet if necessary before trimming back on. It's quicker than dropping, climbing to windward and then re-hoisting in the usual way.

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