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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Eastern Atlantic seaboard
    Posts
    3,042

    Default Re: Greece, chartering to do skippered charters, pitfalls?

    Skippering for a Greek charter company is great if you want to get lashed in a taverna every night but you won't get rich. In 2015 Sunsail paid their skippers £120..........a week!
    I'd rather be tethered to a pad eye than tethered to an iPad.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    2018/19 Floating west in the Pacific
    Posts
    2,198

    Default Re: Greece, chartering to do skippered charters, pitfalls?

    Quote Originally Posted by sailaboutvic View Post
    ...bareboat company runs from the other year and heard then explains how to haul up a sail and when best to pull what sail out and when...one hour lesson no more then a go on each , then they where let loses on a 45 foot boat...how can the company let them charter his comment was , the boat insured and they have a ICC so no problem. I think I said some thing like , may not be for you but it is for the poor guy they hit .
    It doesn't get better elsewhere:
    We're in Bora Bora this week, so back into charter yacht infested waters, the charterers are primarily sailing around Huahine, Raiatea, Tahaa and Bora Bora all of which are inundated with complex and shallow, though admittedly well-charted reefs and getting the 20-30 miles between islands can quickly turn into a serious open-ocean passage a far cry from floating about in the sheltered waters of the 1-onion. Despite this, the skill, experience and qualification requirements necessary to charter a yacht here seem to be about the same as in the 1-onion; a large proportion of them are simply incompetent.

    It’s the weekend/changeover back in Raiatea so mercifully quiet today, but during the last few days we’ve jumped into the dinghy to help eight get themselves moored, not to tie stern-to a quay or even anchor, simply picking up a mooring ball – hardly rocket science! Their biggest issue seems to be high topsides and short boat hooks along with engines that obviously only work in full ahead or full astern. Thursday morning though we did reach a new high (or perhaps low) when a charter catamaran which we’d helped moor-up the night before came to leave: The engine started fine and the gears engaged, but the boat wouldn’t actually go anywhere, it just turned in circles and occasionally bounced to a stop/pivotted around; waving and shouting couldn’t get the message across, so it was back into the dinghy, motor over and suggest that taking-off the mooring line might help?
    There's a small tug-boat whose primary task seems to be recovering charter yachts and towing them back to the charter boats’ marina/repair yard on Raitea; during the last month or so we’ve seen it towing four catamarans and one mono (how many haven't we seen?) and whilst they might just have suffered unfortunate mechanical failures or breakdowns, two at least appeared to have a water-pump on deck, working hard to keep it afloat. The attrition rate is horrendous, so perhaps the profit isn't in hiring out the yachts, but in the insurance claims for repairing them?
    Hit the road often enough and eventually it will hit you back.

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