Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    17,608

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    Quote Originally Posted by petem View Post
    As P says, unless you're being metred it's an academic exercise.
    Actually, when I said it's a bit academic, I was referring to the PF/kW conversion.
    But knowing the A absorption is almost essential in my books, in any boat with an array of AC equipment.
    Without it, it's impossible to "manage" AC usage, understanding what you can and can't use, depending also on the shore power available.
    I did have the AC Amp meter also in my old lady in fact, even if her electrical system wasn't half as complex as the one of the DP.

    So, I perfectly understand Vas point - so much so, that I asked Mr.DP directly.
    He told me that it used to be included as standard in their electrical panel (together with several other components), but according to some clients it was too complicated, so at some point in time they got rid of all unnecessary stuff, installing them just on demand.
    They didn't have many forumites among their clients, obviously...
    Last edited by MapisM; 20-08-19 at 18:45.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    17,608

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteadee View Post
    Got much more important stuff going on, like where did I leave my other sock this morning?
    I sympathize with that. Right now, my main concern is whether to shave before going to bed or tomorrow morning...

    Thanks for the theoretical refresh anyway, but that leaves the question about whether the PF differences I am seeing are "normal" or not unanswered.
    Assuming that there is such thing as a normal/usual variation range, that is (I suspect there isn't).

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bucks & St Raphael SoF
    Posts
    1,471

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    I don't have AC amps either - Digital AC voltage, battey voltage, DC amp consumption, battery charger supply amps, and amp meter for both alternators. An AC amp meter would be pretty useful

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    17,608

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    Quote Originally Posted by markc View Post
    An AC amp meter would be pretty useful
    Yup M, coming to think of it, I remember to have noticed the lack of AC Ammeter also on a couple of F165 which I've seen.
    Btw, the earlier F175 did have it. Maybe they also decided to keep it simpler, 'dunno.

    Anyway, if you should decide to give the thing a try, I can confirm that it does work well and the electrical installation is dead easy.
    I can't vouch for its duration/reliability yet, only time will tell...
    The main problem you would have, if your electrical panel is like the one below, is that there's nowhere to put it.
    Which is the same problem I'm also having, btw.
    But the thing itself is pretty small (you can see exact size in the Amazon link above), so hopefully you could find a spot somewhere nearby...

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bucks & St Raphael SoF
    Posts
    1,471

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    Thanks P, and yes that is exactly the same as my main panel and no room to fit it, but I do have a secondary AC panel close by and room to place it adjacent.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    449

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    Quote Originally Posted by MapisM View Post
    I sympathize with that. Right now, my main concern is whether to shave before going to bed or tomorrow morning...

    Thanks for the theoretical refresh anyway, but that leaves the question about whether the PF differences I am seeing are "normal" or not unanswered.
    Assuming that there is such thing as a normal/usual variation range, that is (I suspect there isn't).
    Sometimes monitoring something you don’t really need to know can just confuse the issue. In my old calibration world we used to ask the question “if a bit of black tape was stuck over the display, would you do anything different”?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    4,870

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    MapisM I wouldn't worry at all about that PF display, referring to the post above,
    and knowing that you have a nice clean and straightforward installation, and you're aware of whats going on reading AC Volt and Amps,

    now answering your question why this huge fluctuation on the PF reading,
    I think its a combi of
    1) many modern (lo Q) 230V adapters / switched power supply's have a bad PF
    2) when AC consumption is very lo, your PF display is out of its usefull range, and does a wrong calculation, (like dividing by nearly zero ...)

    not much experience with that, but thats what I think..

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    ation, Loc: ation, Loc: ation.
    Posts
    16,490

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    Quote Originally Posted by MapisM View Post
    Actually, when I said it's a bit academic, I was referring to the PF/kW conversion.
    But knowing the A absorption is almost essential in my books, in any boat with an array of AC equipment.
    Without it, it's impossible to "manage" AC usage, understanding what you can and can't use, depending also on the shore power available.
    I did have the AC Amp meter also in my old lady in fact, even if her electrical system wasn't half as complex as the one of the DP.

    So, I perfectly understand Vas point - so much so, that I asked Mr.DP directly.
    He told me that it used to be included as standard in their electrical panel (together with several other components), but according to some clients it was too complicated, so at some point in time they got rid of all unnecessary stuff, installing them just on demand.
    They didn't have many forumites among their clients, obviously...
    Fair enough. For me it would be an academic thing as I can't recall ever tripping the main RCD or marina RCD, even when I assume the A/C, kettle and immersion heater are running. If I did get a trip in this circumstance then it wouldn't be difficult to adapt behaviour accordingly.

    P, are you saying that you trip your RCD if you're running too many power consuming items at once? Are houses in Italy the same as in the UK this is a non issue for residential property.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Boat- Western Med
    Posts
    5,321

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    It’s all a bit of a academic exercise as they have said .Does not change the outcome .You either have enough Amps for the stuff you elect to run or don’t .
    If you don’t you soon know and adopt behaviour to accommodate what’s offered .

    On the S/Sker 16 A boat in France wife would trip the shore if the Aircon ( 2 x marinair self contained units ) , hob 4 burner induction , micro wave then kettle boiling for cuscus or something ?
    She figured out when to knock the Aircon off etc while cooking .

    With the 32 A boat in Fr this did not happen it was fine to run a full galley and air con .But the Aircon s a Ac to DC brushless motor system that never turns off , just slows down so no start spikes to trip out the shore power .

    In Italy same in theory 32 A berth , but the quality of power feels not quite as strong as the Fr .
    Kettle for example takes longer , my 220 V drill feels a bit anaemic .Cant put my finger on it .No worries we haven’t tripped it yet so that’s the main thing it’s just the 220v feels weaker than in Fr .

    The only thing we do need to think about and activity manage is the geny power as it’s a tiny aircooled 3.5 KvH , up side is 90:kgs .
    It powers the Frigomar AC which chucks out 42000 btu and the leccy cook top .The cook top is ( sorry can’t recall the brand ) a “ marine “ not domestic and lower than Ave power requirements.
    Both units were fitted by a specialist marine sparky who’s dealing with “ trip “ wether shore or geny issues as his bread n butter business .
    He rips out nearly new OEM air con and galley appliances on large charter boats , usually in the first winter .

    Our tiny geny can’t cope with after a day @ anchor , theses 3 on at once
    Aircon if the outside temp is nearer 40
    Cook top with all 3 burners on
    Charger a massive 80 A / 24 v

    One of the above needs to be off for the other two feed on the 3.5 kvh geny If@ anchor .
    It’s no biggie .

    I’ve only got a V meter and can see it fall from 220 to 215 or what ever and hear a deeper note from the geny to realise it’s struggling .

    As said never had any issues with the 220 v on shore except it feels weaker in Italy .

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Volos-Athens
    Posts
    4,847

    Default Re: Monitoring of onboard electrical system

    well I beg to differ...

    it's v.helpful to be able to monitor how ONE device is doing...
    FE, watermaker will suck 12A (geny is 8KW) when working properly prefilters clean, etc.
    Will drop to 10A if I'm going too fast for it and cannot suck enough water to produce the expected 120lph of if prefilters are fouled slightly.
    So just looking at it I know how this device is functioning
    Similarly on the stabs if operating through the el.motor and not engine.

    now sure I'd have any use for the PF that P. now also has though

    cheers

    V.

    PS. haven't bothered turning on the AC this year, but that is a constant load nothing I've noticed changing on it

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to