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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Sail on the Medway, Kent from Chatham Maritime Marina
    Posts
    1,835

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Carcassi

    I have just sent a PM to you with details of a flat alongside Liverpool University site. It is in a block that I just sold a slightly larger flat that my daughter lived in whilst at Liverpool University, so it is very convenient and has on site car parking (the university charge you for parking on site). THis I feel would be your best option.
    If my foresight was as good as my hindsight, I would be a multi-millionaire.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    12,292

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Don't let the nay-sayers put you off - what you are proposing is perfectly fine provided you don't penny-pinch.

    While it is true that most marinas do not accept liveaboards - at least officially, I don't think that any will complain about you sleeping aboard three or four nights per week. Living on a small, old boat throughout the British winter can be pretty depressing, but if you can afford something reasonably new and thirty-odd feet or longer and you can afford the bills to heat it properly and run a dehumidifier, then there is no reason why it should not be pretty comfortable. But don't underestimate the cost of keeping it warm and dry - boats are not well insulated and you can get through quite a lot of diesel and electricity keeping it habitable in January and February.

    Don't listen to anyone suggesting any of the more arcane, traditional forms of heating - charcoal stoves, drip feed diesel or worse! They will not give you a uniform distribution of heat, they will build up the humidity in the boat and they will consume oxygen, requiring you to open hatches at a time when you really don't want to do that. You need a blown-air diesel heater from a reputable manufacturer and in very good condition. That will give you responsive heating that can be controlled to ensure that all parts of the boat are at the temperature you need. Make sure that it is adequately rated too - one of the entry-level diesel heaters with an output of 3kw is not going to keep a boat in the high thirty to low forty foot range adequately warm in Liverpool in mid-January!

    You will need a good dehumidifier too - no question about that. For a boat in that size range, a Meaco dessicant dehumidifier should be fine - it is capable of pulling several litres of water per day out of your atmosphere. But it will be running most of the time in January and February - and drawing a couple of hundred watts, so the electricity bill will begin to rack up.

    If you are choosing a boat for winter liveaboard, look for something with a good cockpit enclosure, or budget to add one. It's not rocket science - you are effectively proposing to spend the winter in a very small, three room flat. If that flat's front door opens directly onto the street, it is going to get cold and damp everytime someone goes in or out and your wet coat and any other wet clothes are going to hang in a corner dripping onto the floor and pushing up the humidity. Having a nice, dry cockpit enclosure where you can leave wet coats and muddy shoes and even hang out damp towels or other washing will make the experience infinitely more comfortable. You will also find that if you have got a decent output Webasto or Ebber diesel heater in the boat, the cockpit enclosure will get quite warm well into the late autumn and again from early spring if you leave the companionway open - giving you an extra room on your home!

    My wife and I have plenty of experience of this - we have spent at least three days per week aboard our various boats all the year round for the last seven or eight years. These have all been well equipped, new boats ranging in size from 33 feet to 43 feet and we have never been cold or uncomfortable. But we have never skimped on heating or power consumption - and the running costs in the depths of winter can be high!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
    Posts
    7,688

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Quote Originally Posted by iLens View Post
    living in what my son called a pied-a-l'eau

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    926

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    I spend a reasonable amount of time on board all year.

    There is a signifcant difference between Summer and Winter.

    Keeping a yacht dry and warm in the winter can be a challenge. Usually they are not well insulated.

    Think hard about home comforts. You may not care about these, then all will be well.

    However, if you do, you may be surprised that typical marina supplies are inadequate to run very much power simultaneously. Turn the hot water heater on and a toaster and you will probably trip the power supply.

    You may well be surprised how much water you get through, so the tanks may need frequent refilling. You will also need to think about your own waste.

    I think you can live very very comfortably on board. Size and equipment of course helps.

    In an ideal world a 32 Amp supply is possible and sometimes available, you can run pretty much what you like, good calorifiers will provide all the hot water you need, and with a top end pump, the equivalent of a home shower is possible, satellite TV can be done, in fact you can live as comfortably as in any apartment BUT you need to think what you can do with and what not if its not to end in misery.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Just to be clear, neither drip-feed diesel nor charcoal stoves add condensation in the boat, as they have flues. A drip-feed diesel heater would actually be an excellent idea, as they are silent, need no elecricity at all, and burn paraffin, diesel or jet fuel, individually or mixed anyhow.
    Blown air heaters are very expensive, noisy, complex devices which use plenty of electricity, are more fussy about fuel, and generally problematical.
    (I'm directly contradicting post #22 here, but only the heating bits..not the rest of it..)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    36,685

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    I've lived away from home 3 or 4 nights a week for months at a time at several points in my career.
    I seriously considered using a yacht a couple of times, but it never happened.
    First thing is, you don't spend much time in your 'accommodation' when working in this mode.
    I tried to work a 4 day week, so usually it's more like 10 hours at the office than 8. Sometimes more.
    Then I would do stuff in the evenings. I went to the gym or the swimming pool a lot. A few meals out with colleagues etc.
    If you've got access to canteen food and showers at the gym/pool etc, it's possible to use your digs quite lightly, so there would be much less use of water, condensation etc. The hours of heating needed would be a fraction of 24/7 liveaboard.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    12,292

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    I've lived away from home 3 or 4 nights a week for months at a time at several points in my career.
    I seriously considered using a yacht a couple of times, but it never happened.
    ...
    The hours of heating needed would be a fraction of 24/7 liveaboard.
    That's not necessarily true - the key to comfortable accomodation on a boat in the middle of the winter in this country is to keep the boat warm and dry all the time. If we have been away for several days in December or January, it takes several hours to get the temperature up to genuinely comfortable levels and the last traces of damp out of the bedding.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    36,685

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Quote Originally Posted by maby View Post
    That's not necessarily true - the key to comfortable accomodation on a boat in the middle of the winter in this country is to keep the boat warm and dry all the time. If we have been away for several days in December or January, it takes several hours to get the temperature up to genuinely comfortable levels and the last traces of damp out of the bedding.
    If you're only sleeping somewhere, you can tolerate a lower temperature than if you're lounging.
    The key is keeping it dry.
    Even in winter, I prefer to have planty of vents open at night, even if that means a thicker duvet.
    If you minimise cooking, showering, washing of clothes, there is much less drying out to be done.

    A good dehumidifier running during the day and blown air heating will make a difference.
    Heating the air rather than the whole structure of the boat.
    A 2kW fan heater heat the air in the saloon of our 35ft boat quite handily. Because we are living actively we are happy with lower temperatures than at home, so long as it's dry. You're on a boat, you expect to wear a fleece or something in the evenings.
    If you are getting up for work, you don't sit around noticing it's cold, up and out the door to coffee in the office.
    Lots of offices have showers these days for the smelly cyclists. Breakfast at your desk is entirely common.
    Personally, I'd look at turning the heating on remotely by phone.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Boat Orwell - Me Norwich
    Posts
    7,688

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    If you minimise cooking, showering, washing of clothes, there is much less drying out to be done.
    But that's exactly the sort of thing you need to be doing much more to live aboard (full or part time), rather than occasional leisure use.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Eastern Atlantic seaboard
    Posts
    3,039

    Default Re: Using a yacht instead of a flat - settle an argument?

    Quote Originally Posted by Carcassi View Post
    Great, thanks for these helpful replies. A stupid question: is pumping sewage/ shower drain out acceptable in a marina on an estuary like the Mersey? I've done most of my sailing in the med where holding tanks and being well offshore is the norm.
    Definitely not. Liverpool Marina is locked with very little water circulation. Pumping out in the Mersey on the ebb would not be a problem.
    Looking atvthe empty berths in Liverpool I don't they would take much persuading to allow a liveaboard.
    I'd rather be tethered to a pad eye than tethered to an iPad.

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