Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 39 of 39
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    12,029

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Suspecting I may be included amongst the cynics I, for one, am pleased they've achieved their target. No mean feat to raise that sort of money for a relatively niche activity in today's competitive fund raising world. I genuinely hope that this is the end of the Trust's financial woes

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    19,187

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by iLens View Post
    I refer you to "Riding for the disabled", "The disabled photographers' society" and "The disabled living society", among others.
    Only the first of those refers to a group of people as "the disabled" and it's an out-of-date usage, probably because the organisation was founded fifty years ago. There's no harm in using modern, polite usage, is there?

    By the way, avoid "wheelchair-bound" as well, if you're ever tempted. Most wheelchair users really don't like that.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    19,187

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by Bru View Post
    Suspecting I may be included amongst the cynics I, for one, am pleased they've achieved their target. No mean feat to raise that sort of money for a relatively niche activity in today's competitive fund raising world. I genuinely hope that this is the end of the Trust's financial woes
    I don't for one instant believe that all that money was raised in a few days, particularly when you see the Gofundme page with lots of "Raised money on behalf of 8 others". It's much more likely that they knew they had a big donation coming in (half a million, say) as well as established fund raising events, so decided to invent a crisis which would (a) get them publicity (b) suggest that they have wide support and (c) pry a bit more money out of the public.

    All of which is perfectly legal and not even particularly immoral, but I don't think anyone who has worked in the charitable sector has many illusions about how fundraising and PR are done.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    12,029

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    ... I don't think anyone who has worked in the charitable sector has many illusions about how fundraising and PR are done.
    I have no illusions at all after 20 plus years of involvement in charity management (all voluntary for what it's worth). Never again!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Where life is good
    Posts
    13,417

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    If the JST gets its million pounds, what are they planning to do to make sure that future revenue is enough to support them? I had a look, and at the moment they charge £200 per person per day, which is roughly the same as Cunard charge for a short voyage in the cheapest cabin with a window and half what they charge for a long trip.

    I've nothing against them and their aims seem laudable, but their financial problems seem structural.
    After the loss of the Solomon Brown, the RNLI realised they only had two weeks worth of funding if people didnít continue to donate ata steady pace. They then set about a serious fund raising campaign which has resulted in them being the richest charity in the UK.
    Life is too short to drink bad wine.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    S.W. France
    Posts
    7,454

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by iLens View Post
    I refer you to "Riding for the disabled", "The disabled photographers' society" and "The disabled living society", among others.
    Where I used to live there was a 'Riding for the disabled' and we usually went to the smart yearly din/dance fundraiser.
    But, it was universally known as the 'Disabled Horses Do'

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    The Known Universe
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by iLens View Post
    I refer you to "Riding for the disabled", "The disabled photographers' society" and "The disabled living society", among others.
    I refer you to calling black people THE black people or Gay people THE Gay people , the use of the word THE to describe a particular group of people is now frowned upon, as a physically disabled person I like just to be called by my Name
    Flying birds have no master

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    1,500

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    Only the first of those refers to a group of people as "the disabled" and it's an out-of-date usage, probably because the organisation was founded fifty years ago. There's no harm in using modern, polite usage, is there?

    By the way, avoid "wheelchair-bound" as well, if you're ever tempted. Most wheelchair users really don't like that.

    If I were a past or future user of the JST I'd be happy to be called 'the disabled' - by a donor, and anything he liked if the gift were large enough. But I'd be tempted to use a far fruitier string of adjectives for someone who tells people what I ought to be called who's made it perfectly clear that he has no intention of giving a penny.

    Speaking as one whose also spent a bit of time in the not-so-able camp you understand...

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    19,187

    Default Re: Jubilee Sailing Trust urgent appeal

    Quote Originally Posted by anoccasionalyachtsman View Post
    If I were a past or future user of the JST I'd be happy to be called 'the disabled' - by a donor, and anything he liked if the gift were large enough. But I'd be tempted to use a far fruitier string of adjectives for someone who tells people what I ought to be called who's made it perfectly clear that he has no intention of giving a penny.

    Speaking as one whose also spent a bit of time in the not-so-able camp you understand...
    Talk me through this. Because you - correctly - assume that I'm not planning to donate to one particular charity working with disabled people, my views on courteous language are invalid? Right?

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to