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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    372

    Default First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    ...now they're coming for the donk. The minister is doing a good job of looking busy in the face of a failing flag and dying sector. Might be time to stock up on electric outboards.

    AMBITIOUS TARGETS TO CUT SHIPPING EMISSIONS

    • Zero-emission capable ships to be in UK waters by 2025
    • Competition launched to spark innovation in clean maritime technology
    • Clean Maritime Plan part of long-term strategy to keep UK as world leader in maritime sector
    All new ships for UK waters ordered from 2025 should be designed with zero-emission capable technologies, in ambitious plans set out by Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani to cut pollution from the country’s maritime sector.
    The commitment is set out in the Clean Maritime Plan published today. The government is also looking at ways to incentivise the transition to zero-emission shipping and will consult on this next year.
    The plan also includes a £1 million competition to find innovative ways to reduce maritime emissions and is published alongside a call for evidence to reduce emissions on UK waterways and domestic vessels.
    The Clean Maritime Plan is part of the Government’s Clean Air Strategy, which aims to cut down air pollution across all sectors to protect public health and the environment. It will also help deliver the United Kingdom’s commitment to be net zero on greenhouse gases by 2050.
    Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said:
    “Our maritime sector is vital to the success of the UK’s economy, but it must do everything it can to reduce emissions, improve air quality and tackle climate change.
    “The Clean Maritime Plan sets an ambitious vision for the sector and opens up exciting opportunities for innovation. It will help make the UK a global hub for new green technologies in the maritime sector.”
    The maritime sector has already taken significant strides to reduce emissions – hybrid ferries are already being used in UK waters, including in the Scottish islands and on cross-Solent journeys to the Isle of Wight. The Port of London Authority – where the Maritime Minister launched the Plan today – also uses hybrid vessels.
    Sarah Kenny, Chief Executive of BMT Group and representing the Mari-UK consortium, said:
    “The Clean Maritime Plan is an important step towards achieving a zero-emission future for the UK. Getting to net zero will not be easy, but it will present significant opportunities as well as the obvious challenges for all parts of our £40bn maritime sector. Maritime is already the greenest way of moving freight, but we can and must do more to reduce emissions.
    “The good news is that the UK is well-placed to not only decarbonise our own economy, but also to share our expertise and capability with the rest of the world as they, too, embark on this most global of missions.
    “For the first time, companies and universities from across the country have come together to collaborate through MarRI-UK, accelerating the UK’s maritime technological capabilities, particularly on decarbonisation.
    “The key ingredient to realising our clean maritime ambitions is collaboration. Between companies, academia and with government. Today’s plan and government’s broader Maritime 2050 strategy, crafted with Maritime UK, provides a framework to do just that.”
    Guidance has also today been issued to ports to assist them in developing air quality strategies. This will both address their own operations and support improving air quality across the country.
    Tim Morris, chief executive of the UK Major Ports Group and member of the Clean Maritime Council, said:
    “The Clean Maritime Plan is a really valuable piece of work, setting out an ambitious path forward for the transformation of the maritime sector in the UK. It doesn’t shy away from the scale or complexity of the challenge of such a transformation. But it’s a transformation that the ports industry, along with the rest of the maritime sector and working in partnership with Government and other stakeholders, is determined to take on.”
    A further consultation to increase the uptake of low carbon fuels will also take place next year.
    The Clean Maritime Plan is part of the government’s Maritime 2050, a long-term strategy published in January 2019 to keep the UK as a world leader in the maritime sector for decades to come.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Salish Sea
    Posts
    1,120

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    Looking into donks, I reckon that you’ll be roughly about the same cost to either buy a new diesel or convert to electric if you’re under 30’. I know what I’d be doing. Unless you’re some sort of hardcore motor sailor it’s a no-brainer for the environment.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    scotland
    Posts
    3,381

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    Quote Originally Posted by armchairsailor View Post
    Looking into donks, I reckon that you’ll be roughly about the same cost to either buy a new diesel or convert to electric if you’re under 30’. I know what I’d be doing. Unless you’re some sort of hardcore motor sailor it’s a no-brainer for the environment.
    Unless of course you are Calmac !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,854

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    Quote Originally Posted by armchairsailor View Post
    Looking into donks, I reckon that you’ll be roughly about the same cost to either buy a new diesel or convert to electric if you’re under 30’. I know what I’d be doing. Unless you’re some sort of hardcore motor sailor it’s a no-brainer for the environment.
    Since my boat is either on a swinging mooring, or sailing, where do I get the necessary electricity? A trailing cable?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    You'll be forced to install a big honking diesel generator. Oh wait...

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    Since my boat is either on a swinging mooring, or sailing, where do I get the necessary electricity? A trailing cable?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Medway
    Posts
    19,729

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    .....rather think this is aimed at commercial shipping.
    Owners of seagull outboards might not need to hide under their beds for while yet ?
    Anybody who has ever seen the filth coming out of some ships funnels can probably understand the need for a clean up.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    22,364

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    Quote Originally Posted by oldgit View Post
    .....rather think this is aimed at commercial shipping.
    Owners of seagull outboards might not need to hide under their beds for while yet ?
    Anybody who has ever seen the filth coming out of some ships funnels can probably understand the need for a clean up.
    You only have to look out to sea during an inversion to see the pollution, and it's not as if the ships use very clean fuel either.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Where life is good
    Posts
    13,662

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    Folks need to read up on IMO 2020

    The use of high sulphur fuel in commercial shipping is being banned from 2020.
    They either have to fit scrubbers
    Or convert to LNG
    Or buy road fuel


    However the effects on the world price of road quality fuel will be pretty bad as there is not enough refining capacity to distill al the HFO into light fuel oil..
    Life is too short to drink bad wine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlantic
    Posts
    20,355

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    Quote Originally Posted by johnalison View Post
    You only have to look out to sea during an inversion to see the pollution, and it's not as if the ships use very clean fuel either.
    Try the Straits of Gibraltar in light airs. Awful, about time emmisions were dragged into the....21st century.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Where life is good
    Posts
    13,662

    Default Re: First they came for the maintenance and the whisky...

    They are being dragged into the C21..

    That's what IMO2020 is all about..
    Life is too short to drink bad wine.

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