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Thread: Extra Space?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    91

    Default Extra Space?

    Is there an upper limit to how big is big enough, accepting that if you have 10 crew you need significantly more space than if you're single-handing, however, given the collective experience/knowledge here, has anyone ever regretted "buying bigger"?

    Is there a collective rule of thumb on 'manageable' space/LOA v maintenance costs, ease of handling etc?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Gone cruising
    Posts
    2,373

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    The collective rule of thumb is that the boat is always too small when it comes to storage space, and always too big when it comes to paying the marina fees, cruising taxes, insurance or yard fees. Handling is less of a problem and can be sorted by throwing more money at it in the form of thrusters, headsets for the crew if the bow is out of shouting range or hired crew to drive it for you

    If you have a bigger boat, you'll end up carrying full size bikes instead of folding, perhaps even motor scooters, scuba gear and a compressor, a huge dinghy in a garage, a comprehensive set of powertools, drill press, lathe, jetski, helicopter, waterplane etc.

    Either way, all cruising boats end up stuffed to the brim with things you think you can't live without.

    One thing that's making a big difference is how well the boat is laid out for storage. You'll find some charter designs with barely any storage but huge open spaces, and purpose built cruising boats with narrow saloons but tons of storage lockers all around.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Home UK Midlands / Boat Croatia
    Posts
    19,805

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    Unless you're thinking of going really large, always keep below 12 metres as that's the sweet spot for LOA vs marina/mooring/statutory charges.

    Or go larger but put 11.99m on your SSR, like ours.

    Richard

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Algarve
    Posts
    9,327

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS View Post
    Unless you're thinking of going really large, always keep below 12 metres as that's the sweet spot for LOA vs marina/mooring/statutory charges.

    Or go larger but put 11.99m on your SSR, like ours.

    Richard
    +1

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    On board
    Posts
    2,794

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS View Post
    Unless you're thinking of going really large, always keep below 12 metres as that's the sweet spot for LOA vs marina/mooring/statutory charges.

    Or go larger but put 11.99m on your SSR, like ours.

    Richard
    Which is fine till you go somewhere like Sant Carles where they started measuring boats due to owners taking the piss. Or you moor on a long pontoon in a space designed for the SSR length but you dont fit because the dinghy hanging off the back puts another 1.5m on the LOA
    If you're not confused, you're probably misinformed

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Winter in Falmouth, summer on board Rampage.
    Posts
    5,164

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    Quote Originally Posted by RichardS View Post
    Unless you're thinking of going really large, always keep below 12 metres as that's the sweet spot for LOA vs marina/mooring/statutory charges.

    Or go larger but put 11.99m on your SSR, like ours.

    Richard
    Or you go to Port-Vendres and check in. Get charged for over 12m despite the boat being described in the SSR as 11.95m and by the builders as 11.97m. On asking why, the port captain said he knew how long Bavaria 38s are and it’s over 12m.....
    Addressing the original question, I was given sage advice by my uncle, who’s lived aboard a boat for the last thirty years or so. He said to buy the biggest boat we could afford that we felt comfortable handling. So we did, and it’s worked out well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Caribbean
    Posts
    2,350

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    I understand that the average boat size in the Caribbean is 45ft. This may be a little out of date so I guess by now the average may be a little bigger.
    This would be a large boat in the UK. Our old fashioned Van de Stadt at 44ft has a huge amount of storage for its length. No modern production boat can compare for the same length but we have only two double beds and a set of bunk beds. Not the multiple berths seen in many charter designs. We liveaboard for more time than we spend in our house and with just the two of us onboard it is a very good compromise between running costs add living space. We rarely go into marinas so not a large cost for us. Sailing comfort and motion are more important to us and space for toys. We carry lots of gear such as folding bikes, nesting 3.5m hard dinghy, 15hp and 10hp engines, diving gear, sailing rig for dinghy, paddleboard, kitesurfing gear, sewing machine, etc! Every space is full and we are always reviewing what we need onboard. I think that you fill what ever space you have.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    91

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    Quote Originally Posted by geem View Post
    I understand that the average boat size in the Caribbean is 45ft. This may be a little out of date so I guess by now the average may be a little bigger.
    This would be a large boat in the UK. Our old fashioned Van de Stadt at 44ft has a huge amount of storage for its length. No modern production boat can compare for the same length but we have only two double beds and a set of bunk beds. Not the multiple berths seen in many charter designs. We liveaboard for more time than we spend in our house and with just the two of us onboard it is a very good compromise between running costs add living space. We rarely go into marinas so not a large cost for us. Sailing comfort and motion are more important to us and space for toys. We carry lots of gear such as folding bikes, nesting 3.5m hard dinghy, 15hp and 10hp engines, diving gear, sailing rig for dinghy, paddleboard, kitesurfing gear, sewing machine, etc! Every space is full and we are always reviewing what we need onboard. I think that you fill what ever space you have.
    Thanks for the answers folks, I kinda knew it was a 'how long is a piece of string' type question! It does seem that the answer will be how well laid out/LOA and handleability v cost and a healthy dose of "do I LIKE her".

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,752

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    Quote Originally Posted by duncan99210 View Post
    I was given sage advice by my uncle, who’s lived aboard a boat for the last thirty years or so. He said to buy the biggest boat we could afford that we felt comfortable handling. So we did, and it’s worked out well.
    I'd agree with that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Extra Space?

    For me it comes down to how much you can afford to spend keeping a boat. I'd love a 40 footer but berthing and maintenance will be beyond my wife's and my pensions combined. My 34 footer is only just big enough for the two of us living on board all year round in enough comfort and with piles of gear (I moan abour her 12 pairs of shoes, she retorts about tools and sails that I never actually use, we tacitly agree to drop the subject). Offbeat is just right for us to afford to live our dream without having to stop and earn money on the way.
    So my advice is buy a boat as big as you can afford to keep, not as big as you can afford to buy.

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