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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    8,677

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Quote Originally Posted by DownWest View Post
    Local bloke bought a Jeanneau 'Flirt' (Don't ask, but it has a big kiss on the mainsail...)
    Good grief, it's true!



    Sorry, not much help to the OP's question. I suppose the trouble is that most of the pretty classic designs are from a time when the convenience of drying out upright wasn't even considered. Maybe a centreboarder is the answer - although they're more common since GRP. Would a fibreglass reproduction of a fairly classic design, suit?



    The maximum length is unusually specific, at 46ft. That's pretty big, especially for a boat that might be asked to dry out. It does sound more like a barge than a yacht.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    A splendid array of responses thank you.

    This is early stage research and I'm stumbling into interesting new ideas daily. I'll happily run a 70m M/Y and its tenders but know next to nothing about small S/V's.

    The idea of legs is interesting. It sounds like it would work well on a f+a mooring, sheltered tidal estuary, muddy sand flat bottom.

    Would a long keel be the safer option when regularly drying out with legs?

    Just saw this on the wooden ships brokerage and fell in love a little: https://woodenships.co.uk/sailing-ya...rne-aas-sloop/

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,677

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Undoubtedly, she is dazzlingly beautiful. The key question is, how much expense and trouble do you want in your life?

    There are quite a few long keelers with 'legs' built in, which are extremely rugged. Fibreglass, I'm afraid, but very cheap, and after a season or two of not having to worry about wood, you may be glad of that decision. Take a look:
    https://www.yachtsnet.co.uk/archives.../seadog-30.htm

    Last edited by dancrane; 11-08-19 at 19:33.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    Undoubtedly, she is dazzlingly beautiful. The key question is, how much expense and trouble do you want in your life?

    There are quite a few long keelers with 'legs' built in, which are extremely rugged. Fibreglass, I'm afraid, but very cheap, and after a season or two of not having to worry about wood, you may be glad of that decision. Take a look:
    https://www.yachtsnet.co.uk/archives.../seadog-30.htm
    A triple keeler? Now you've gone and thrown a spanner in the works.

    I work a 10/10 week rotation so I have the time for maintenance, and cost is negotiable. I guess something ready to sail around 40K that I can work on here and there would be doable.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,677

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Given that this is the "Classic and Wooden" section of the forum, I mustn't discourage your open-minded enthusiasm, especially as I haven't wholly owned a wooden boat for at least 35 years, and that was a pram dinghy. Although, when I dropped it on a garden gnome, I had a chap repair the hole for me, and it wasn't cheap work, even then.

    Griff Rhys-Jones said something very acute about owning a beautiful wooden boat (he's had several) - to the effect that however many days, months or years of work you put in, and whatever you spend, hundreds, thousands, or hundreds of thousands on her restoration or maintenance, you'll only ever be bringing her back to being almost as good as she was when she was new.

    I think this is his yawl, Argyll.



    I'm not saying you're doing it to profit from it, but even just keeping the boat from losing value means investment of cash and effort. Most people aren't into that, hence the popularity of glassfibre, which (believe me!) isn't maintenance-free, but is less work than wood.

    Me, I don't understand the huge popularity of single-keel yachts which cannot easily dry-out upright in so many attractive UK ports.

    Legs are quite a rare solution, widely mistrusted, I don't know whether that's fair. Most people buy fin-keelers for the performance, and simply accept that places they might have wished to go, are out of bounds...and that a deep water mooring is an inescapable necessity. If you are a purist, and dream of racing lines and glorious traditional styling, good luck to you, and bless your poor wallet.

    But it ain't necessarily so. If a boat is built like the Seadog 30 pictured earlier, you won't be worrying about which way the wind and tide are moving on stormy nights, because the design allows her to dry out upright. She won't win any races (they really are slow) and they're not especially elegant. It'd be my choice though, because I think the boat should primarily look after you, not vice versa.
    Last edited by dancrane; 11-08-19 at 20:26.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    888

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Quote Originally Posted by grahambaines1987@outlook. View Post
    A splendid array of responses thank you.

    This is early stage research and I'm stumbling into interesting new ideas daily. I'll happily run a 70m M/Y and its tenders but know next to nothing about small S/V's.

    The idea of legs is interesting. It sounds like it would work well on a f+a mooring, sheltered tidal estuary, muddy sand flat bottom.

    Would a long keel be the safer option when regularly drying out with legs?

    Just saw this on the wooden ships brokerage and fell in love a little: https://woodenships.co.uk/sailing-ya...rne-aas-sloop/
    Don’t look at Sandeman Brokerage then....

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    6,586

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    Undoubtedly, she is dazzlingly beautiful. The key question is, how much expense and trouble do you want in your life?

    There are quite a few long keelers with 'legs' built in, which are extremely rugged. Fibreglass, I'm afraid, but very cheap, and after a season or two of not having to worry about wood, you may be glad of that decision. Take a look:
    https://www.yachtsnet.co.uk/archives.../seadog-30.htm

    That is a very practical design of boat. I can see a lot of advantages to owning one.

    But how does she steer astern? I ask as the owner of a Twister, a yacht which gives rise to uncertainty, and occasionally a degree of anxiety, when driven astern.
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    8,677

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    I wasn't claiming personal knowledge of the Seadog, only hoping to describe the broad difference between a design that reliably looks after herself, and others that need a fair bit of pampering.

    There's a fairly detailed report on the Seadog here: https://www.sailingtoday.co.uk/uncategorized/seadog-30/

    You're right to question her controllability astern, very dubious I'm sure. On the other hand, I wonder how many people's choice of yacht has been based on that characteristic?

  9. #19
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    Oct 2018
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    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    Quote Originally Posted by dancrane View Post
    .... On the other hand, I wonder how many people's choice of yacht has been based on that characteristic?
    Well I certainly never gave the ability to steer astern a moment's thought when I chose my yacht (a Twister). I had a rude awakening when I first tried it. I did wonder for a moment whether the rudder had fallen off!
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    9,820

    Default Re: Classic live-aboard able to dry out.

    There are rather few good looking classic wooden centreboarders in Britain in the size that you are after.

    However, there are quite a few in the States, and given your profession, arrangements for shipping one will hold no terrors for you.

    Philip Rhodes is the outstanding designer of the type.

    Might be too small for you but I had a friend who lived aboard a Maurice Griffiths «*Kylix*» .
    Last edited by Kukri; 13-08-19 at 11:47.

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