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  1. #81
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by scotty123 View Post
    Wasn't it all 'aim for a landfall' (not a specific harbour), then turn port/starboard to get to your destination?
    I remember when I was doing my cadetship as a deck officer being advised that Navigation was not a precise science so it was not necessary to employ the bendy parallel rulers to get the perfect fix. On long passages we always took noon sites and we had to practice starsites and azimuths as part of our training. All worked out long hand with 5 figure logs and a "Sights" book in which I had prepared a proforma sheet to use to capture everything on. Sometimes it was pretty good, other nights the lines were all over the place

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,458

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    I most certainly have seen a small(ish) boat navigated accurately with a sextant, a deck watch, a Walker Excelsior log and a lead line, for several thousand miles including little known coastlines.

    https://comlay.net/tilman/voyages/1974-spitzbergen/
    FWIW I've read all Tilman's sailing books and met Bob Comley and seen him talk. Astonishing adventures. (Well for Tilman I guess it was an astonishing way of life.) FWIW greatest respect to you all from this weekend sailor.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    9,540

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by CamR View Post
    I remember when I was doing my cadetship as a deck officer being advised that Navigation was not a precise science so it was not necessary to employ the bendy parallel rulers to get the perfect fix. On long passages we always took noon sites and we had to practice starsites and azimuths as part of our training. All worked out long hand with 5 figure logs and a "Sights" book in which I had prepared a proforma sheet to use to capture everything on. Sometimes it was pretty good, other nights the lines were all over the place
    Our company and I suspect many others navigated “according to Hoyle”, as you describe, but had “standard passages” which were all built around making safe landfalls on prominent features. We had to re-think these after GPS. Not only were they adding miles but on one occasion when we were trialling one man bridge operation the Mate dozed off after a full day’s cargo work and made a rather too perfect landfall just short of the lighthouse he was aiming for. It wasn’t a disaster but it was embarrassing and the end of one man bridge operations...

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Home: North West, Boat: The Clyde
    Posts
    3,593

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Iíve just done a passage from Plymouth to the Solent.

    About 3 hours after passing south of Portland Bill I went below to complete the log. The fairly old Garmin plotter at the nav station showed the boat icon about a mile east of the entrance to Weymouth. In my 25 years as a recreational sailor this was my first witness of a GPS failure.

    The boat had another Garmin plotter near the helm and this was showing correct. When on othersí boats, I carry a Lenovo Tab with VMH Raster charts. With 3 of us on board, including the ubiquitous Dumb Phones, we had access to GPS on 7 devices.

    I still used a hand written night pilotage plan for entrance through Needles Channel.

    Upon arrival and after turning the power from the panel off and on again, the plotter in question burst back into life. Earlier, it had shutdown using its on-off switch but then refused to respond any further.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Grenoble
    Posts
    31,389

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    I most certainly have seen a small(ish) boat navigated accurately with a sextant, a deck watch, a Walker Excelsior log and a lead line, for several thousand miles including little known coastlines.

    https://comlay.net/tilman/voyages/1974-spitzbergen/
    Thanks for that Minn, the last paragraph giving an insight int HWT not previously recognised.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    West London
    Posts
    2,632

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by davidjackson View Post
    I’ve just done a passage from Plymouth to the Solent.

    About 3 hours after passing south of Portland Bill I went below to complete the log. The fairly old Garmin plotter at the nav station showed the boat icon about a mile east of the entrance to Weymouth. In my 25 years as a recreational sailor this was my first witness of a GPS failure.

    The boat had another Garmin plotter near the helm and this was showing correct. When on others’ boats, I carry a Lenovo Tab with VMH Raster charts. With 3 of us on board, including the ubiquitous Dumb Phones, we had access to GPS on 7 devices.

    I still used a hand written night pilotage plan for entrance through Needles Channel.

    Upon arrival and after turning the power from the panel off and on again, the plotter in question burst back into life. Earlier, it had shutdown using its on-off switch but then refused to respond any further.
    "Pilotage plan"?
    Don't you just use the sectored lights of the Needles & Hurst LH's?

  7. #87
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    6,085

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark-1 View Post
    FWIW I've read all Tilman's sailing books and met Bob Comley and seen him talk. Astonishing adventures. (Well for Tilman I guess it was an astonishing way of life.) FWIW greatest respect to you all from this weekend sailor.
    Reading about the voyage to Svalbard reminds me of my own early career - I helped to produce one of the earliest accurate maps of NordAustlandet, and worked on Svalbard through the 80s - my first trip there was in 1972!

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,458

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by AntarcticPilot View Post
    Reading about the voyage to Svalbard reminds me of my own early career - I helped to produce one of the earliest accurate maps of NordAustlandet, and worked on Svalbard through the 80s - my first trip there was in 1972!
    Incredible, I suspect there was a bit more ice there back then.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Home: North West, Boat: The Clyde
    Posts
    3,593

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by scotty123 View Post
    "Pilotage plan"?
    Don't you just use the sectored lights of the Needles & Hurst LH's?
    Use what ever you like. I hadn't done a night entry for several years so preferred the added reassurance of ticking off the laterals and cardinals from the fairway buoy.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    6,085

    Default Re: Call yourself a navigator?'

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark-1 View Post
    Incredible, I suspect there was a bit more ice there back then.
    Probably more sea ice. The glaciers probably haven't changed vastly. See https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...D39B652A47466D and https://www.cambridge.org/core/servi...case_study.pdf

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