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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,720

    Default Re: Weight in the bow

    Many years ago, as a 19 year old Laser sailor, my yacht club sailing instructions stated that every boat racing had to carry an anchor and 150' of anchor line. The lightest anchor that I could find was a grapnel weighing about 1.5kg and I coupled it with 150 feet of 1.5mm line.

    Stowing it in the cockpit was a bummer and I took to sticking the anchor in the left pocket of my waterproof top and the anchor line in the right pocket. Strictly speaking, perhaps not within the rules but back in 1974 you were still allowed to wear lots of wet woolly jumpers so not much different really. On the plus side it was far easier to divest myself of my anchor than a woolly jumper.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,720

    Default Re: Weight in the bow

    Quote Originally Posted by Channel Sailor View Post
    Lw395’s post about “when sea is not flat” is of particular interest because in a flat sea my yacht I think is very quick (as I suppose are many yachts) but in a chop it very difficult to get anywhere near the same speeds (probably this is normal too). So slow it feels like is is not sailing to its rating capability. As lw395 says it is if I would need different polars for flat and choppy sea states. But these 20% or more reduced speeds in a chop can be knocked back even further when the yacht rocks and the very pointy end slams into the chop. In a F6 Solent chop a few days ago is what started me thinking about weight in the bow, because it felt like it would be better if the boat did not rock so much. Instead having enough speed to keep the bow up somewhat.

    Extra mid season bottom cleans cost time and or lots of money, laminate sails cost lots and affect rating, whereas moving an anchor for an experiment is free. I think I will find a couple of secure tough bags to have on board and if time when next out for a ride in a chop, I will try moving the anchor and chain to the saloon floor tied very securely to the mast support. If it makes a difference it will be obvious because to on many occasions when in choppy sea myself and the crew have been puzzled as to what has happened to max attainable speeds. It very noticeable.

    I realise I need to think about the other end of the yacht as well. The 45 litre fuel tank is located under the aft end of the cockpit seat, which is currently is full. Half a tank would be enough for what I mostly do.

    Thank you all.
    I recommend sailing a Laser or Fireball to really appreciate the effects of chop on windward progress. You have to free off a little bit, perhaps power up the sails a bit more and steer around the waves as best as you can.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,349

    Default Re: Weight in the bow

    Part of looking at weight in the ends is abut philosophy - being conscious of weight.
    The anecdote about Neil Pryde cutting toothbrushes in half illustrates the point - simply be weight conscious. If you leave the weight in the ends, that could be moved, what else don't you bother with. Do you race with full water and fuel tanks, that extra, unnecessary, sail - and then - do you win races.? If you don't win races maybe the philosophy is wrong and you need to think of cutting the handles off toothbrushes. I know its daft - but if you get down to that level - you presumably, have already moved the anchor, ensured the fuel tank is not full (but has enough) and the crew don't turn up struggling under the weight of the kit they carry. As mentioned insuring you have a clean hull will make a difference, a lot if it is grotty (we used to dry sail our X99) most Etchells are dry sailed (and here they have separate races for wet Etchells). Every little helps.

    I have had professionals on our yacht, not that I paid for them but simply because they wanted a sail. They commented that most of us know as much about sail trim as a professional - the difference is they apply that knowledge every second, we tend to lose concentration.

    Of course if you don't sail to win but do it simply for the company and pleasure of sailing - it really does not matter.

    And I believe Neil Pryde won Olympic medals and then graduated to become a successful ocean racer - so I think he knew what he was doing (though whether he cut the handles of toothbrushes - I don't actually know).

    Jonathan
    Last edited by Neeves; 10-08-19 at 05:14.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    5,969

    Default Re: Weight in the bow

    When I bought my Twister the chain was right forward. I moved it a few feet aft so it is now in a chain locker between the forward bunks and there was a big improvement.

    For convenience in handling the anchor quickly I tried carrying the anchor in the bow roller instead of having it stowed in chocks on the foredeck but this was a bad move and made the boat wetter.
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

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