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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    14,369

    Default Re: Cutting down a trolling motor

    This has nothing to do with your question but I thought that this video about refurbishing a similar motor might be useful for your friend. If it is not, just ignore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=I5xTHJBuV1Q
    Should we paint what is on a face, what is inside it, or what is behind it?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Home UK Midlands / Boat Croatia
    Posts
    19,762

    Default Re: Cutting down a trolling motor

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister E View Post
    There is no drive shaft, just the wires going inside the tube.
    I was trolling.

    Richard

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    19,528

    Default Re: Cutting down a trolling motor

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    I've never looked at one - We live and learn. What's in the box at the top of the shaft? I'd assumed, maybe wrongly, that the battery were a separate unit (or are they in the box?).
    Control box at the top of the shaft, motor at the bottom, separate battery. Like this (battery not included):



    Quote Originally Posted by oldharry View Post
    On the one I had, the switching and electronic speed control PCBs were in the top end, mounted well clear of the water. I wouldnt want to cut the height down, awkward though it is, as i found even that high up they are subject to spray and damp, which are instant death to the electronics. Isnt that why they are mounted so high? We all know seawaters' propensity for getting in where its not wanted!
    I think they are generally used to propel fishing boats (in the "boats used for fishing", not the "seine netter" sense) and so need long shafts to reach the water. We'll mainly be using it on calm days in fresh water, exploring bit of Loch Ken, and occasionally on quiet evenings on the sea, so the convenience of cutting down outweighs the hazards you point out. Very useful reminder, though, for which thanks - I'll pay close attention to sealing it all when I reassemble.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Oxford & WicorMarine
    Posts
    220

    Default Re: Cutting down a trolling motor

    I have one, and still haven't cut it down - it's on the list though. One thing you might like to do is to replace the big croc clips for connecting to the battery - they are apt to pop off just when you don't want them to. I use in-line mains connectors, with the plug side connected to the motor, and the socket side connected to the battery. Actually, I use two separate 22Ah batteries, which are relatively easy to carry (especially since they are in handled fabric pouches), so that #2 can be swapped in should the first one show signs of fading. If I were following CDG practice, of course, I'd have 3 batteries - one for in, one for back and one for reserve. But I do have oars as well!

    You do have to go over the connectors about twice a year with wet&dry paper to get oxidation off. Otherwise it's worked very well.

    Steve

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    19,528

    Default Re: Cutting down a trolling motor

    Quote Originally Posted by sgr143 View Post
    I have one, and still haven't cut it down - it's on the list though. One thing you might like to do is to replace the big croc clips for connecting to the battery - they are apt to pop off just when you don't want them to. I use in-line mains connectors, with the plug side connected to the motor, and the socket side connected to the battery. Actually, I use two separate 22Ah batteries, which are relatively easy to carry (especially since they are in handled fabric pouches), so that #2 can be swapped in should the first one show signs of fading. If I were following CDG practice, of course, I'd have 3 batteries - one for in, one for back and one for reserve. But I do have oars as well!

    You do have to go over the connectors about twice a year with wet&dry paper to get oxidation off. Otherwise it's worked very well.
    Many thanks, Steve, that's very helpful. I am planning to use Anderson connectors: one on the outboard, one on the battery (or on each battery) and one on the boat for recharging. Two batteries would be nice, but for simplicity I am inclined to go for single 36Ah deep-discharge AGM from Yuasa (https://www.tayna.co.uk/marine-batte...oard/rec36-12/). Nice handled bags are available for that too. We also have oars for backup.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

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