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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    8

    Default Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    Hi,

    Hoping for a bit of honest advice.

    Is it at all possible/advisable - to get started in motor boating on the south coast dorset/sussex (maybe some parts of kent) - WITHOUT any training. Is it safe in a smaller boat, staying very near.....or is there really a necessary minimum level of rya training etc.

    We enjoy sea fishing.....and would love to gradually build up (i.e. further out) into that. I am looking at the RYA courses but it will take me a while to schedule that all in and eventually get through helmsman/skipper/coastal/offshore....

    But I was wondering if I can dive in safely alongside within some boundaries (quieter harbour/marina, well chosen first boat (suggestions welcome), pootle out a tiny bit and bottom fish for tiddlers).

    Regards

    K

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    Quote Originally Posted by justk2012 View Post
    Hi,

    Hoping for a bit of honest advice.

    Is it at all possible/advisable - to get started in motor boating on the south coast dorset/sussex (maybe some parts of kent) - WITHOUT any training. Is it safe in a smaller boat, staying very near.....or is there really a necessary minimum level of rya training etc.

    We enjoy sea fishing.....and would love to gradually build up (i.e. further out) into that. I am looking at the RYA courses but it will take me a while to schedule that all in and eventually get through helmsman/skipper/coastal/offshore....

    But I was wondering if I can dive in safely alongside within some boundaries (quieter harbour/marina, well chosen first boat (suggestions welcome), pootle out a tiny bit and bottom fish for tiddlers).

    Regards

    K
    You say you enjoy sea fishing, have you had experience helming boats that take you? I would say that you don't necessarily need training, but should have some experience.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Poole....there's a surprise :-)
    Posts
    778

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    legally you need not do any courses however, if you have no boating experience do yourself a favour and take the RYA level 2 course. It takes 2 days and will be the best money you will ever spend in your boating career. If you already have a boat then it is possible to take this course on your own boat but it will cost more.

    Martin

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    kent. Boat in Sant Carles
    Posts
    689

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    A "quieter harbour / marina" is still likely to have some relatively expensive vessels berthed in it. Not sure an insurer would look too kindly on you clunking someone's pride and joy in a fit of panic and your claim form asks for your qualifications and you say "none".

    Common sense and a bit of knowledge will help the safety aspect, but if you don't know the basic rules of the road..... Near the English Channel.... It could be a challenge for you at best...

    As said above PB2 a will give you most legal requirements.. And if you can do it in your own boat, so much the better...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    London
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    Would be good to know what you mean by a "smaller boat". Coastal/offshore definitely way off in the distance and not worth thinking about as a newbie. Depending on the type of boat dayskipper or PB2 would be more suitable. A lot of people fish out of a RIB in the Solent, which is what I started with and easy to single-hand, but i'd already done a PB2 before buying the RIB. As a rule of thumb i'd say if it's going to have one engine (particularly an outboard), then go for PB2 rather than dayskipper -- iirc it's nearly all practical on-boat training so "fun". If you can spend the time to find and buy a boat you can spare 2 days for a PB2 course. Worth doing the course where you want to be based as you'll pick up some invaluable local knowledge as well. If you want to go out at nights then you'll want to take some more advanced courses later on, but after a PB2 you ought to be competent (or swearing you never want to own a boat)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Conwy
    Posts
    4,061

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    Driving a car in a farm field and driving on the road are two different things. You may be able to handle a small boat in close proximity to others but if you dont know the "rules of the road" you could become unglued very quickly. Looking back, even with a PB2 under my belt how I didn't come to physical or financial harm when starting out is a minor miracle. There is so much to learn you may as well start on the correct footing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    West Berkshire (boat Hamble)
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    As others say, Powerboat Level 2 should be done. Think safety. Do you want the responsibility of going out on a boat without some basic boat handling, navigation and safety... The tide can be a serious factor to consider aside from wind conditions. Add to that basic rules of the road and hazards, and you begin to see the reasons why some basic training is so essential IMO.

    PB2 is a 2 day course. If you have no boat handling experience or knowledge on navigation / hazards then you'd be crazy not to do it.

    Boating is great fun, but not when it goes wrong and it can go wrong very quickly in the wrong hands.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    438

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    Again as said PB2. It is a 2 day lightweight course with about 2/3 boat handling, the rest being theory. It does not go into any great depth but does cover all the basics and consequently is an ideal start point for Powerboating

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Stratford on Avon
    Posts
    11,176

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    You should not go to sea, even staying close to the shore unless you understand tides, current, weather buoyage and basic navigation. You need to know how to respond to other boats, sail, power, and larger ships. You can read a lot about this, but practical experience is also necessary.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    SoF
    Posts
    9,462

    Default Re: Getting started - south coast (cross over post from other forum)

    I am very fortunate that I am a year round boater, this means I can keep my skills uptodate. But during our very crowded summer months for a lot of boaters this is their only chance to be on the water for the year. And often you see mayhem as they try to regain their skills. This is despite the fact that they are all licensed, trained and experienced in France.
    The upshot is, don’t go to sea thinking you know it all. Your bad experience could reflect badly on the rest of the boating community. These exams and training are very important, and what’s more they are fun
    Neither a Leaver or Remainer be

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