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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    North West
    Posts
    554

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by FairweatherDave View Post
    I read (after the event) about attaching to a forward cleat, makes complete sense (as does stretchier line).
    Don't tie it forward, if that's what you mean, hook it round something and then back to the cockpit so you can release it without going forward.

    You should be able to just uncleat it from the cockpit.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Cyberspace
    Posts
    35,616

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by FairweatherDave View Post
    Cheers all. Love the forum! Learnt loads here. Going to have to find yet another long bit of rope. Not going to repeat what is now known in our family as "The West Pole incident"
    Make sure the dedicated preventer line is a different colour, so it is easy to find in the locker when you need it. Take it forward (all teh wayu oputside everything, of course) and round a snatchblock, cleat or fairlead near the bow so it can run freely, then back along the side deck to a winch. Let the boom all the way out then winch the preventer in to tighten it. To gybe, just slacken the preventer, gybe and re-rig it on the other side afterwards before going back on a dead run.

    Make sure the genoa pole is rigged with the sheet free to run through the eye and an after guy holding the pole back. This means you can just roll the genoa away if you need to without having to go forward or de-rig the pole. Now you have complete control from the cockpit.


    - W

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    1,362

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    More good stuff. JBJag27 just rubs in the basic mistake. My preventer was fixed and unreleasable in the event of a gybe, accidental or otherwise. Not clever.
    Thanks Webcraft. Re. rigging the genoa pole that is already what I do..... nice and easy to furl . Sort the pole later.
    The whole event emphasised to me how much better things are if controlled from the cockpit.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat: Portsmouth, Us: Stewkley
    Posts
    3,012

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Also if you run the preventer forward (we use the spinnaker downhaul block) you can still scandalize the main if you get caught out; release the kicker and heave on the topping lift. It's amazing how much less scary an overloaded mainsail is when the boom is sticking up at a stupid angle. A lot safer on deck too.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    falmouth
    Posts
    17,233

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    I have a strop pemanently attached to the end of the boom - when not in use it is kept tight to the boom by a bungy attached near the goose neck. The preventers are run through toe rail blocks just aft of the shrouds with lines led back to the winches.

    I would never pole out the genoa and rig preventers at the same time unless on a reasonable leg in open water. Just too much to disconnect if you need to do so urgently for any reason. MoB or collision etc. So I use the preventer on its own most of the time - ots the jibing boom that can kill not the genoa.
    this post is a personal opinion, and you should not base your actions on it.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    37,715

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    This preventer in a F4 stuff is perhaps the wrong thing to be doing?
    Just head up a few degrees and spend some time on the tiller improving your helming, get better at sailing through the waves keeping the boat more stable?
    Head up 15 degrees, you won't need to sail much further and you may go a bit quicker, as you get more skilled or know the boat better, you can safely sail progressively lower if you want to.

    Just to be awkward, we do sometimes set a preventer in the smaller boat from the vang to the toe-rail, but only in light airs when a sloppy sea or wash is shakng the boom around disturbing the main, not to resist big forces like a gybe or dipping the clew in the sea.

    A proper preventer from the clew end of the boom led well forwards is needed when it gets rough and you really need to be close to a dead run.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    1,362

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    No doubt my helming can improve and I know some people like to go from reach to reach and avoid a dead run. But the course was dead down wind and with pole and preventer we were making good speed and I was enjoying the surfing. I hate the genoa collapsing and refilling and in a rolly sea state I think holding a downwind course broad reach just right is quite a challenge too. With a properly rigged preventer plus the pole I would have been fine. I feel I would have had to deviate a good bit more than 15 degrees to fill the genoa, more like 30. However the wind was very much a F4, I had a single reef in the main and I was expecting to take a few rolls in the genoa after the gybe for the broad reach into Chichester.
    Last edited by FairweatherDave; 17-08-19 at 14:44.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Romsey, Hants
    Posts
    1,210

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    +1 for this. Amazing how many of my sailing pals don’t know the word. A very safe way to depower.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruffles View Post
    Also if you run the preventer forward (we use the spinnaker downhaul block) you can still scandalize the main if you get caught out; release the kicker and heave on the topping lift. It's amazing how much less scary an overloaded mainsail is when the boom is sticking up at a stupid angle. A lot safer on deck too.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    12,214

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    How I rig my preventer (10m Ketch) (note: normally I'm solo)
    The rope is 10mm braid on braid.
    One end goes round the end of the boom and I form a long loop and tie it with a bowline with the bitter end looped back through the knot. The knot is about a meter or so from the boom so that it's easy to reach from the (center) cockpit and untied with just a pull on the bitter end.
    The rope then goes forward, hooks over the forward horn of the forward spring cleat, then back along the deck to a cleat outside the cockpit.
    To tension, I let the boom out more than is required, put a little tension on the preventer and cleat it off, I then tension the preventer by tightening the main sheet.
    I like the idea of sending the preventer forward around the bow cleat and back to the cockpit on the leeward side but I think it might be a bit of a hassle if I have to rig snatch blocks. I will try it and see.
    MontyMariner.co.uk
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  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    37,715

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by FairweatherDave View Post
    No doubt my helming can improve and I know some people like to go from reach to reach and avoid a dead run. But the course was dead down wind and with pole and preventer we were making good speed and I was enjoying the surfing. I hate the genoa collapsing and refilling and in a rolly sea state I think holding a downwind course broad reach just right is quite a challenge too. With a properly rigged preventer plus the pole I would have been fine. I feel I would have had to deviate a good bit more than 15 degrees to fill the genoa, more like 30. However the wind was very much a F4, I had a single reef in the main and I was expecting to take a few rolls in the genoa after the gybe for the broad reach into Chichester.
    You could have poled out the genny without a preventer on the main. You should then be able to sail happily around 10 degrees up from true DDW?
    Keeping the genoa filled does require some skill, but also correct setting of the pole.
    I see a preventer as a second backstop to an involuntary gybe, it's there just in case rather than to be routinely relied on.
    A bit like ABS in a car.
    Of course every sea is different and if you feel you want a preventer, rig one.

    Even with a correctly rigged preventer, if a sea catches you badly and the boat spins around the clew, it's not pretty.

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