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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    1,346

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    You could have poled out the genny without a preventer on the main.
    Very true.
    I was thinking of what is the deepest broad reach angle you can use the genoa without rigging a pole? (Sort of a general practical question, not a racers perspective)


    Re. the preventer. I like to rig it sometimes purely if I want to let another member of the family on the helm. So I can relax. I've got good wind awareness, rest of the family really don't!

  2. #42
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    37,263

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by FairweatherDave View Post
    Very true.
    I was thinking of what is the deepest broad reach angle you can use the genoa without rigging a pole? (Sort of a general practical question, not a racers perspective)

    ...
    That depends on many things, relative size of sails, wind speed, sea state...
    In lighter winds, you don't need to head up so much to bring the apparent wind forwards.
    In stronger winds, you can reef the main more and let the genoa do the work.

    I too like to get less experienced people on the helm, I often find it helps to tell them we plan to sail off to one side then gybe, and let them only sail as low as they are comfortable with. You can usually come up a lot of degrees before it adds significant time to the passage. And by heading up, you can often choose more or less tide etc.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Re the deepest broad reach, when training new dinghy sailors, the top tip is get them to watch for the "nodding dog". Get them to keep an eye on the clew of the jib. The sign that they are just deeper than a "training run" (the deepest of broad reaches) is when the clew "nods" vertically down. This is the incipient sign of the jib entering the wind shadow of the main. Turning any further away from the wind and the jib flogs in the wind shadow.

    I now teach (in dinghies) that the nodding dog is to running what tell tale lifting is to beating.

    I confess, since I picked up that tip this summer, I've not tried it on a big boat, in particular with a genoa. Perhaps someone who's out on the H2O could try it and feed back?

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Stirling
    Posts
    14,410

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyInBed View Post
    I think it might be a bit of a hassle if I have to rig snatch blocks. I will try it and see.
    Only takes a few seconds, but we just leave ours in situ.
    Ω

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