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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat (now back in) the Clyde
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    5,570

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    In windy, rolly downwind conditions the best solution is often much simpler than worrying about boom preventers and gybes.
    Simply leave the mainsai down, unroll the genoa and make a cup of coffee, sailing downwind almost as fast and no boom to worry about. When reach destination furl genoa. Lots of experienced sailors have travelled thousands of miles in this way.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,338

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by dunedin View Post
    In windy, rolly downwind conditions the best solution is often much simpler than worrying about boom preventers and gybes.
    Simply leave the mainsai down, unroll the genoa and make a cup of coffee, sailing downwind almost as fast and no boom to worry about. When reach destination furl genoa. Lots of experienced sailors have travelled thousands of miles in this way.
    Not with a small self tacking jib
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat (now back in) the Clyde
    Posts
    5,570

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    Not with a small self tacking jib
    That is precisely why small self tacking jobs are a fashion that net creates extra work, with asymmetrics etc needed that a conventional genoa avoids
    PS. You would be amazed how effective even a 110% blade jib can be downwind, using the conventional tracks forward to control twist. And a dawdle to tack upwind as well, best of both.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Plymouth
    Posts
    8,490

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    I rig two preventers, one each side. They lead forward inside the shrouds to the bow fairleads then back outside all to a position level level with the cockpit where they are attached to the guardrails with a snap-shackle until required. Attached to the extreme aft end of the boom is a single short strop, having a ring in its free end.

    When I want to rig a preventer I unclip it from the guadrail and clip it to the ring on the strop. Then pay out the main sheet and take up the slack on the preventer, finally tightening it by hauling in the mainsheet as necessary.

    To gybe I pay out the active preventer and haul in the mainsheet hard and unclip the preventer that has been in use. Then transfer the strop to the other preventer, gybe and tension the new preventer as before.

    (takes longer to decribe than it does to do it! )

    Well, that's at least three of us using this set up. On a downwind course I leave both preventers set up, with one lazy.
    The lines are quite light and also do duty as spinnaker pole downhauls and for the tack of the cruising chute.

    I think attempting to cushion a gybe with anything but the mainsheet, in time honoured fashion, would lead to problems. The exceptions being the various devices that have been designed for the job - which may have put the plan into Dave's head in the first place.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,338

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by dunedin View Post
    That is precisely why small self tacking jobs are a fashion that net creates extra work, with asymmetrics etc needed that a conventional genoa avoids
    PS. You would be amazed how effective even a 110% blade jib can be downwind, using the conventional tracks forward to control twist. And a dawdle to tack upwind as well, best of both.
    I sail single handed and would not be without the ST jib.that being said i do not recall ever running down wind with just a genoa on my last 2 boats. By the time one has messed about booming it out one may as well use the main.
    Personally I just always feel the desire to get on with it, so have always kept the main working

    going back to the thread- i attach the preventer to the boom at the mainsheet attachment point. I do not use a snap shackle but tie a loop with a bowline. The loop is very large and the reason for this is that once set i can release the knot whilst standing in the cockpit and not have to reach outboard to the boom attachment point to relese it. Nor do i have to pull the boom in to do so in a big rolly sea.
    however, i rig my preventer different to everyone else as i flick it over the spring cleat and back to the cockpit winch.
    I find that it is good enough and use one line that can be swopped over. I tend not to run dead down wind if on autopilot or using the Aeries so the angle of the preventer is OK. I also keep more sail off the spreaders

    as for gybing in heavy weather, i have an ST jib and sail single handed & getting the main in whilst helming then feeding it out can be awkward in big seas in a fin keeled boat which is directionally unstable. My solution is just to do a simple chicken gybe. The boat spins in a sixpence and as long as i check the slack mainsheet does not catch i do not have to pull any sheets whatsoever and ther is no strain on the rig.
    Last edited by Daydream believer; 15-08-19 at 09:29.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    5,964

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    I like to have the main up all the time in case I have to suddenly turn into the wind to recover a man overboard or a hat, or to heave to. Also i like the look of it!
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    1,362

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Thanks for the further posts, lots to study, but safe to say my new preventer system will be conventional and I won't be using it to dampen the gybe.
    With regard to using both genoa and main in rolly conditions I confess there was an element of thrill seeking, as much as there can be in a Konsort on a run without a spinnaker (something we are definitely not ready for......well I am but no-one else is). So we got 8.2knots SOG with the help of surfing the swell and a bit of tide. But my other motivation was to get there as quickly as possible to keep my family interested and happy in a somewhat uncomfortable sea state. I like booming out and preventing, it feels safe! However in different circumstances, proper steady cruising, my genoa alone is a very effective option. We managed five hours from Newtown Creek to the top of Chichester harbour sailing all the way which is a long passage for my lot.
    Particular thanks to Steveberry for the detailed post. Good stuff. (My head is less on the ball today, A level results for our boys, all good, phew........no domestic revision stress for next summer's sailing plans.....)
    Last edited by FairweatherDave; 15-08-19 at 11:05.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Stirling
    Posts
    14,434

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Biggles Wader View Post
    That is the most appalling diagram but you are excused detention because it is actually a very good way to manage the problem
    Ω

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    12,214

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    I like to have the main up all the time in case I have to suddenly turn into the wind to recover a man overboard or a hat, or to heave to. Also i like the look of it!
    Ok for short legs of a passage but if the leg is more than a couple of hours I ditch the main and run under twin headsails.
    MontyMariner.co.uk
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  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat (now back in) the Clyde
    Posts
    5,570

    Default Re: Rigging a boom preventer, and gybing deliberately. Got it wrong.

    J
    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    I like to have the main up all the time in case I have to suddenly turn into the wind to recover a man overboard or a hat, or to heave to. Also i like the look of it!
    Our boat will go to windward fine under jib only. But if an MOB downwind under genoa quickest solution would be rapid furl and motor back. Quicker than removing a preventer, gibing and sailing back.
    Coincidentally it was a breezy downwind day in the Sound of Mull this morning, and of the dozen boats closest to us a full 10 of 12 were under jib only, one sailing main only - and one motoring downwind without even unfurling their jib, going slower than the sailors. Nobody had two sails set until the breeze dropped down.

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