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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Near Maldon, Essex
    Posts
    2,629

    Default Advice on seasickness

    My wife and I did a bit of sailing last week and she said that, but for a period of seasickness, she actually enjoyed it. (Result!!)

    Whilst she is on deck she does not get seasick, also not whilst at anchor. But, if she goes below whilst under way, even for a short while, she gets queasy.

    What advice can the panel give on seasickness, because if we can cure that, we can do some more longer cruises?
    Last edited by Gitane; 19-08-19 at 09:20.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    9,786

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    Very simple one: preserved ginger.

    Stugeron is the most widely used and readily available medication. It must be taken several hours before going aboard. Don’t drive after taking it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Swale/Medway
    Posts
    4,371

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    If it's a bit rough I can't spend long below either, although fortunately my wife has a better stomach for it. I don't get on with Stugeron, we use the other sort (hyoscine, I think?) in the form of Boots 'Travel Calm' brand. They work faster than Stugeron, too, effective within 15-20 minutes we've found. Gave a granddaughter one of these the other day when she started to look a bit pale, it certainly fixed her quickly.
    If we set off on any longer trip e.g. cross-Channel, we usually both take the Travel Calm before we start, and we're both usually fine then.
    Haven't really found that ginger does the trick. Appreciate visits are needed below, but perhaps your wife would be best to keep them as brief as poss, and to prepare food/drinks etc for the trip before you start.
    Keep up to date with 'East Coast Pilot' at www.eastcoastpilot.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    22,865

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    Stugeron certainly, but part of the trouble is sometimes inexpert helming. The motion of the boat can be very different with different helmsmen. I once took over the helm of a Trapper 501 off the Naze when I noticed my wife and daughter turning green, after which they found it much more comfortable in the quartering sea.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Eastern UK
    Posts
    1,970

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    I suffer badly. A trip to Holland can result in me vomiting 5 to 7 times.
    There are two basic drugs in the tablets etc. Stugeron has one, but tends to make people drowsy - not great if you need your wits about you but maybe ok for a crew member that doesn't. The other drug is found in Kalms and some patches. This is fine for me unless I am sick and then I can't sit upright but have to lay down even though I feel ok otherwise. Probably a balance thing. There are some mechanical options... there are some weird glasses which are a tube half full of blue liquid which means you can see the 'real' horizon when down below etc. Then there are things like Sea Band which are wristbands with bobbles on the inside that go on the accupressure point on the inside of your wrist. A more advanced version of those is a 'watch' which fits in the same place and has a couple of small contacts. When you turn it on, you get a rhythmic tingling sensation for a few seconds, which is a different pattern to the motion of the boat. You can increase the intensity if needed.
    I have tried all of these other than the glasses. The watch thing works best for me and means I am alert and not affected by the side effects of Stugeron/Kalms. It still doesn't stop it fully though.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese. -- Steven Wright

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    When I was a pup, all them years ago, I was a 16yr old just left school. I went straight to the boats and spent 3 days solid being sea sick, I was crawling the deck on my hands and knees.

    I got over it.

    There's 3 types, the folk who never get seasick, the folk who get seasick once or twice and their body adapts and then they never do again, then the folk who just get seasick every time.

    I fell into the 2nd cat thank goodness.

    I stopped smoking years ago. I didn't want patches or chewing gum or tablets, I just stopped lighting cigarettes. I know a guy who's addicted now to nicotine chewing gum.

    When I was sick, I was just outa school and I went to a 54ft trawler with the bunks in the front... oh dear... not a good start. A great big crewman cut up a plaster and put a small 1cm square on each side of my head. I still to this day dont know if that was a placebo or not lol but it worked for me.

    The body will cope, trust me.

    Kind regards

    Skip
    Last edited by skipper681; 19-08-19 at 12:14.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,317

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    Scoperderm patches.

    Small patch worn behind the ear turned SWMBO from being sea sick on a boating lake to Ellen Macarther! After a few years of using them she now manages without.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    Quote Originally Posted by pks1702 View Post
    Scoperderm patches.

    Small patch worn behind the ear turned SWMBO from being sea sick on a boating lake to Ellen Macarther! After a few years of using them she now manages without.
    That's very interesting and as my post above saying about placebo, that's what the big fisherman did to 16yr old me, he just cut up a plaster and did that.

    Kind regards

    Skip
    Last edited by skipper681; 19-08-19 at 13:06.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    12,474

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    Quote Originally Posted by pks1702 View Post
    Scoperderm patches.

    Small patch worn behind the ear turned SWMBO from being sea sick on a boating lake to Ellen Macarther! After a few years of using them she now manages without.
    Scopoderm are excellent if you can take them. They are a psychoactive drug and can cause hallucinations in some people - she needs to try one at home on a day when she can afford to go to bed and sleep it off if she starts seeing pink elephants

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Northern Ireland
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: Advice on seasickness

    Quote Originally Posted by maby View Post
    Scopoderm are excellent if you can take them. They are a psychoactive drug and can cause hallucinations in some people - she needs to try one at home on a day when she can afford to go to bed and sleep it off if she starts seeing pink elephants
    Are you asking his wife to go to bed lol?

    Kind regards
    Skip

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