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Thread: Mooring options

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    4,262

    Default Re: Mooring options

    I had my Etap 22i in Cardiff yacht club, as was my Westerly 33. I also had a mooring in Dale. Both are very good but for very different reasons.
    Allan
    Sailblogs.com search Brilliant with Hilary and Allan as crew. Password Bristol.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    924

    Default Re: Mooring options

    Dale for sea access, CYC for everything else ?

    I must admit to having considered an Etap. Not in my comparison, but I did spend a fair few minutes on the advert. It made me think about whether 22 could be a possibility.
    Last edited by Luminescent; 12-09-19 at 20:19.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    4,262

    Default Re: Mooring options

    My Etap 22i foot was bought for very specific reasons. 1. I lived in an area in France that was close to a number of lovely sailing areas. 2. I had a powerful company car with all fuel paid for to take it to new sailing areas. 3. I knew I would have to bring it to England after my fixed 3 year contract in France finished. Realistically 22 feet is the most you want to trail and launch single handed.
    I would not recommend the Etap as a good boat for the Bristol channel. They, along with most light boats, don't handle chop well.
    Allan
    Sailblogs.com search Brilliant with Hilary and Allan as crew. Password Bristol.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Mooring options

    I think that the OP is over estimating the maintenance costs by a considerable factor. You do not need to buy everything new and you do not need to pay the engineer prices from the large operations. You can carefully buy used, do it yourself or use a experienced independent marine engineer.
    Might help if I share some examples done on my boat(1984, 28 foot Dehler) in the first two years of ownership, the number in brackets are what I could have paid new with a big local company doing the work.

    1) replacement gearbox - £50 from eBay plus fitting charge £250. (£1,000)
    2) replace running rigging -£250 for new, quality line from eBay with diy fitting. £800)
    3) add electric pumping to water supply - £30 pump online plus diy (£300)
    4) convert fixed backstay to adjustable - £50 for eBay over specified adjuster and £40 for staylock fitting plus diy. ( £600)
    5) replace interior carpet with waterproof - £30 for industrial ( not marine) carpet plus diy. (£600)
    6) patch and repaint treadmaster deck -£80 for patches, glue and paint plus diy (£1,500)
    7) new sails- nearly new and perfect size laminated main, jib and genoa sails £500 total from eBay. (£3000)
    Total paid £1230 vs a potential cost of £7,800

    Not an exhaustive list but you get the idea. My view is I have a old boat and it will never be perfect but it now looks smart and is completely functional.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    924

    Default Re: Mooring options

    Hi Dutch,

    Better than underestimating! Having discussed with a good many forumites and youtube sailors (as in people who sail and not simply use boat to get from a-b and then spend the entirety of video discussing b rather than sailing XD)... I have likewise reduced my maintenance costs. My maintenance costs also include periodic refits and surveys but I've had to guess on a few things.

    I've probably swung the other way right now, but I'm aiming roughly at a monthly maintenance budget between £150-£200. Which has brought the entire thing into a more feasible scenario. (Mooring will still be a pita though). This of course depends on which services I can utilize. I may end up joining half a dozen clubs just to make use of the maintenance facilities... (it'd still work out cheaper than some marinas...).

    Your input is much appreciated and certainly I want to be aware of how to replace/maintain these things on a regular basis myself in case I get into trouble <out there>. So I am expected to be doing a lot of the work myself.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bristol Channel
    Posts
    217

    Default Re: Mooring options

    A word of caution. You’d be as welcome as a fart in a spacesuit if you join multiple clubs just to use facilities. Clubs are cheap because they rely on their members to pitch in and help organise events, racing, launch and recovery, maintenance of club facilities etc. Members’ labour is a key resource for clubs.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    924

    Default Re: Mooring options

    It's certainly not the plan that's for sure. The plan is more to use places like Rudders, boat yards that are specialized for that service. That said, that isn't to say I wouldn't contribute my fair share. I'm quite happy to get involved. It'd *still* be cheaper than the marinas XD.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    482

    Default Re: Mooring options

    Quote Originally Posted by Snoopy463 View Post
    A word of caution. You’d be as welcome as a fart in a spacesuit if you join multiple clubs just to use facilities. Clubs are cheap because they rely on their members to pitch in and help organise events, racing, launch and recovery, maintenance of club facilities etc. Members’ labour is a key resource for clubs.
    That part holds me back from club membership. Full time working and living far from the area, any participation in club life cuts deep into precious sailing time.

    Moorings associations could be good substitutes, you need to shop for facilities elsewhere.
    Last edited by GTom; 16-09-19 at 17:50.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Wales
    Posts
    924

    Default Re: Mooring options

    Quote Originally Posted by GTom View Post
    That part holds me back from club membership. Full time working and living far from the area, any participation in club life cuts deep into precious sailing time.

    Moorings associations could be good substitutes, you need to shop for facilities elsewhere.
    Most clubs seem to offer an annual buy out. It probably works out better for them if they have a solid core of volunteers anyway. You pay £100 per annum, you can skip the duties. Compared to some Marina's they could increase that by an order of magnitude and it'd still be cheaper to go with a club.

    If you don't have much time (i.e. can't go down each week end) it might be worth avoiding getting your own boat and instead chartering or partnering with someone else.

    Mooring associations are something I could look into though!

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