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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    More rampant generalisation. A minute ago they never used them.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Travelling
    Posts
    10,352

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Quote Originally Posted by Parabordi View Post
    What a lot of twaddle. Just cos you dont see them offshore don't mean they don't go.
    Total over generalisation...
    I think not.
    "It is better to light a single candle than to curse the darkness."

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Wargrave
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Watching two Broom 39's getting into Shiplake lock on Saturday afternoon you would think they were laying down a smokescreen. A very unpleasant one at that.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    244

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    'blipping' up to 2000 rpm every couple of hours seems reduce the smoke effectively. - one engine at a time, of course - I would hate to produce too much wash (??),
    .

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Quote Originally Posted by Mushroom2 View Post
    Watching two Broom 39's getting into Shiplake lock on Saturday afternoon you would think they were laying down a smokescreen. A very unpleasant one at that.
    a bit like following a 50 years old fumy petrol engine in a Freeman 23? (runs for cover)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    N Hampshire
    Posts
    1,970

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Not sure where you chaps do your boating but I have never seen a smoky Yanmar. Perkins HT 6354 in a Broom 37 Continental, yes.
    Don’t take any notice. Very many boat owners buy a boat unsuited to the non tidal Thames because they wish to cross the channel at more than 6 knots. Yes, 75% of their cruising might be at 8kph (bloody silly measurement) but with judicious use of one engine at a time and a little welly at appropriate moments (preferably whilst passing groups of liveaboards, sic) and all will be well.
    Whilst at sea, enjoy cruising at 18 knots and consuming disgusting quantities of diesel. Yes!!!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    I have twin 4 cyl Yanmar 160 hp, in my Broom.
    I hate Turbos, due to years of operating heavy machinery.
    The main thing, with Turbos, is due to the rotation, as they pump, over atmospheric air pressure, into the bloc.
    The Turbo, is whining at thousands of revolutions, even though your engine rev counter, is showing a lot lot less !
    To prolong the life of your turbos, irrespective, of how long the engines have been running, fast or slow revs, you have to give the engines 5 mins, in neutral, so the turbos can wind down, then turn off.
    I know, some lock keepers ask you to turn your engines off, while in the locks, but, they are not the ones, paying to repair your turbos !

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    1,792

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Almost good advice above for a turbo in a road car that’s been driven hard, allowing everything to settle to normal temperatures with some normal driving is a great idea.
    However in a boat on the river it’ll make no difference whatsoever. The exhaust temperatures between 1500 revs and tick over is negligible as is oil temperature and in both cases will be well within the speciation of the turbo
    Last edited by prof pat pending; 10-09-19 at 19:20.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    4,218

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Quote Originally Posted by prof pat pending View Post
    Almost good advice above for a turbo in a road car that’s been driven hard, allowing everything to settle to normal temperatures with some normal driving is a great idea.
    However in a boat on the river it’ll make no difference whatsoever. The exhaust temperatures between 1500 revs and tick over is negligible as is oil temperature and in both cases will be well within the speciation of the turbo
    +1 Yes that is 40 year old advice, modern oils and turbos mean you don't have to do that anymore unless you have been running really hard prior to switching off.
    But I suppose if you have 40 year old turbos and run on old spec oil it might be a good idea
    The bigger risk is just coking the exhaust side turbo vanes up and seizing the turbo due to slow running, so better to turn off asap than leave it running.
    You can't win really, I just use the boat now and have stopped worrying about this stuff

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Lurking in the Thames Valley
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: Best way to avoid engine issues when using at low speeds

    Quote Originally Posted by philipm View Post
    Slight newbie question.
    I'd be interested to hear views from others on this potentially expensive issue.
    Try a second set of props, especially if you don't intend to go to sea for two seasons or more.
    Less pitch than your current set, so the engines can run harder.

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