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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    5,171

    Default Re: Sail to power "conversion" training / familiarisation

    Quote Originally Posted by Elessar View Post
    You’re right.
    There are times to use the “wrong” engine. Eg if portside to a pontoon, with a little bit of port helm, and the port engine forward, the boat will move forward and stay parallel to but move away from the pontoon. When you are used to your boat you can get the right amount of helm to crab like that to great effect.
    Can’t do that in a shaft drive you have to pivot off your fenders or (heaven forbid) blip your bowthruster to gain clearance from the pontoon.
    May I beg to differ? We were shown by an experienced boat handler on the Thames last year that, to move away from a stationary position alongside in a lock, just put the helm a bit to Port and just click into ahead on the Port engine. The prop wash tries to kick the stern to Starboard and the turning effect from the Port prop tries to turn the bow to Starboard also, result a gentle movement away from the wall. You do have to centre the helm quickly and engage the other engine. We found it excellent advice and have used it ever since in that situation. This with shaft drives and no thrusters. Would not work very well in an onshore breeze though.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    River Itchen, Southampton
    Posts
    7,215

    Default Re: Sail to power "conversion" training / familiarisation

    Quote Originally Posted by Leighb View Post
    May I beg to differ? We were shown by an experienced boat handler on the Thames last year that, to move away from a stationary position alongside in a lock, just put the helm a bit to Port and just click into ahead on the Port engine. The prop wash tries to kick the stern to Starboard and the turning effect from the Port prop tries to turn the bow to Starboard also, result a gentle movement away from the wall. You do have to centre the helm quickly and engage the other engine. We found it excellent advice and have used it ever since in that situation. This with shaft drives and no thrusters. Would not work very well in an onshore breeze though.
    Yep it can work if you have big rudders. It doesn’t work on mine so that’s my defence but you are right. (Of course because you do it!!)

    I’d add though it’s easier in a stern drive as you don’t have to recentre the wheel when you take the power off. (Too much defence for being wrong??)
    Last edited by Elessar; 06-09-19 at 16:55.

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    457

    Default Re: Sail to power "conversion" training / familiarisation

    Originally Posted by Elessar
    image: http://www.ybw.com/forums/images/ybw...post-right.png
    View Post
    You’re right.
    There are times to use the “wrong” engine. Eg if portside to a pontoon, with a little bit of port helm, and the port engine forward, the boat will move forward and stay parallel to but move away from the pontoon. When you are used to your boat you can get the right amount of helm to crab like that to great effect.
    Can’t do that in a shaft drive you have to pivot off your fenders or (heaven forbid) blip your bowthruster to gain clearance from the pontoon.

    Read more at http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread...zuUQSXgveBw.99

    Quote Originally Posted by Leighb View Post
    May I beg to differ? We were shown by an experienced boat handler on the Thames last year that, to move away from a stationary position alongside in a lock, just put the helm a bit to Port and just click into ahead on the Port engine. The prop wash tries to kick the stern to Starboard and the turning effect from the Port prop tries to turn the bow to Starboard also, result a gentle movement away from the wall. You do have to centre the helm quickly and engage the other engine. We found it excellent advice and have used it ever since in that situation. This with shaft drives and no thrusters. Would not work very well in an onshore breeze though.
    Different words, same description.
    Also works on twin shaft drive

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    River Itchen, Southampton
    Posts
    7,215

    Default Re: Sail to power "conversion" training / familiarisation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteadee View Post
    Originally Posted by Elessar
    image: http://www.ybw.com/forums/images/ybw...post-right.png
    View Post
    You’re right.
    There are times to use the “wrong” engine. Eg if portside to a pontoon, with a little bit of port helm, and the port engine forward, the boat will move forward and stay parallel to but move away from the pontoon. When you are used to your boat you can get the right amount of helm to crab like that to great effect.
    Can’t do that in a shaft drive you have to pivot off your fenders or (heaven forbid) blip your bowthruster to gain clearance from the pontoon.

    Read more at http://www.ybw.com/forums/showthread...zuUQSXgveBw.99



    Different words, same description.
    Also works on twin shaft drive
    Yes I know don’t rub it in. I’ve admitted I was wrong to say it doesn’t work on shafts. I still maintain it’s easier on outdrives and used the excuse that it doesn’t work on my shaft drive boat.
    But now I’m doubting myself. I’m going to have a play tomorrow. I will admit it if I was wrong about that too.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    457

    Default Re: Sail to power "conversion" training / familiarisation

    Quote Originally Posted by Elessar View Post
    Yes I know don’t rub it in. I’ve admitted I was wrong to say it doesn’t work on shafts. I still maintain it’s easier on outdrives and used the excuse that it doesn’t work on my shaft drive boat.
    But now I’m doubting myself. I’m going to have a play tomorrow. I will admit it if I was wrong about that too.
    Wasn’t rubbing it in. I had missed your previous post.
    Have a play and see what it does
    On mine with small rudders but big props, the drive forward has more effect than the crab sideways when on full helm.
    Another little trick is to crab sideways is full helm and alternate very small CW and ACW rotations. This is a fairly slow process so the slightest wind or tide pushing back on and it won’t work.
    Last edited by Rocksteadee; 07-09-19 at 09:01.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    River Itchen, Southampton
    Posts
    7,215

    Default Re: Sail to power "conversion" training / familiarisation

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteadee View Post
    Wasn’t rubbing it in. I had missed your previous post.
    Have a play and see what it does
    On mine with small rudders but big props, the drive forward has more effect than the crab sideways when on full helm.
    Another little trick is to crab sideways is full helm and alternate very small CW and ACW rotations. This is a fairly slow process so the slightest wind or tide pushing back on and it won’t work.
    Too breezy and too many people on board today so I didn’t experiment. I pivoted around my ball fender to get off my blown on berth. And so nothing to report. ......,

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