Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    96

    Default Towing an inflatable

    I know it's best to lash it to the deck, but usually it's safe enough and more convenient to tow it. I remove everything, including the outboard and tow close astern.

    Any tips or advice on this and on minimising drag?
    Many thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Grenoble
    Posts
    31,760

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Pull it up high so the bow is out of the water.

  3. #3
    stingo is offline Account Closed (By user's request)
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Algarve
    Posts
    9,394

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Not too close astern: they tend to surf your wake which results in them catching up with you, then hitting your transom.
    Another thing, if you have a bung in the dinghy's transom, remove it so that the bung hole becomes a self-bailer. With the o/board removed, the transom should no longer be in the briny.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Clyde
    Posts
    7,394

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Grab hold of the tow line and see what distance or length of line produces the lowest or most drag.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Durham, England
    Posts
    16,563

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    I once towed an inflatable with my Centaur, but never again. It filled with water quite quickly just from waves occasionally splashing over it, and acted as a brake, slowing me to two or three knots.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,532

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Bow tied up with only the stern of the tubes in the water suits me best

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Scarborough
    Posts
    628

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Don't tow alongside, even for a short distance..I scratched the yacht's topsides badly after 5 miles in sheltered water doing that, the chafing by the inflatable was 100 times worse than I imagined..

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,453

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Quote Originally Posted by elton View Post
    I once towed an inflatable with my Centaur, but never again. It filled with water quite quickly just from waves occasionally splashing over it, and acted as a brake, slowing me to two or three knots.
    I have often wondered why"inflatable dinghies" were invented

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    458

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Ideally tow length, measured stern to stern, is 2 wave periods.
    This minimises jerking as each boat rides the waves simultaneously

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Essex
    Posts
    22,876

    Default Re: Towing an inflatable

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocksteadee View Post
    Ideally tow length, measured stern to stern, is 2 wave periods.
    This minimises jerking as each boat rides the waves simultaneously
    That might be conventional advice for a tender, but try pulling on the painter and see how much drag you are inducing. Try again with the dinghy's bow clear of the water and you will see a massive difference. With my moderate sugar-scoop stern this means that the dinghy prow is rubbing on the stern, but apart from squeaking a bit this doesn't cause a problem.
    Far away is near at hand in images of elsewhere

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to