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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Where life is good
    Posts
    14,000

    Default Re: Lazyjacks re-think

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyInBed View Post
    The solution has got to be full length battens
    I have full length battens ... and they still foul the lazyjacks..
    Life is too short to drink bad wine.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    6,289

    Default Re: Lazyjacks re-think

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyInBed View Post
    The solution has got to be full length battens
    Or none
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,616

    Default Re: Lazyjacks re-think

    I sense there's a degree of agonising over solutions which are unnecessarily complex and expensive. F'r example, there's no need to buy/fit expensive blocks - which will generate wear on the sail where they rub - for simple, cheap s/s rings will do very well.

    There's no need to drill holes in spreaders to affix s/s eye-straps, when a pair of 6"-8" half-inch webbing straps with Velcro fitted, and a s/s ring each, will do a better job.

    'bbg', Dutch' and 'dancrane' have effective answers, and I fitted such an arrangement to a friend's Rival 34 more than a decade ago. The webbing straps were fitted around the spreader roots. Another crew member was suspicious of the Velcro straps 'in shear', but two of us bouncing on each line couldn't shift them. The set-up is still up there today.

    Yes, we found that occasionally a batten-end would catch on a line during hoist. So we learned to do that early part of the hoist slowly, picking our moment to heave on the halyard and easing it down a foot if we got it wrong. Having the two lines adjustable at the boom-end using a short loop-back and rolling hitch was more convenient than a trip to the mast and back - especially at night, in lumpy weather.

    This is from the Harken page....

    Raising Sail
    When hoisting sail, check to make sure the sail does not get caught in the Lazy Jacks.

    The headboard or battens may catch between the mast and the Lazy Jacks or jam in the angle between the lines. If the halyard is forced, this could result in a broken batten,
    ripped sail or damaged Lazy Jack. To avoid this, look aloft*** as you raise the mainsail and stop if the sail gets caught. Also, make sure the boat is facing head-to-wind.
    The sail is less apt to catch on the Lazy Jacks if the topping lift is used and the Lazy Jacks are somewhat loose. This way they will deflect out of the way easier when the
    sail makes contact with them.
    ***I find looking aft at the battens/lines contact point more helpful. And, the boat does not need to lie head-to-wind, provided the mainsheet is loosened such that the mainsail is 'feathered' into wind.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Lazyjacks re-think

    I agree with the over analysing observation.

    Following fitting a new stack pack bag I researched all sorts of lazy jack methods, solutions and products but then realised I was due to leave on a trip in a couple of days and still had not sorted it out. I tied lines to the spreaders/mast junction and fitted rough triangles leaving lots of spare line. I then fiddled about with lengths and raising / dropping the main for an hour until I got the geometry right for my boat. I then added small carabineers to the line ends to tidy it all up.

    Job done in 2 hours max at less than £30 and no need to adjust anything when using the solution. One of the advantages of keeping the fixing points near to the mast is that there is enough slack in the system to allow for boom movement without adjustment. My boat is only 28 foot length so appreciate that a bigger boat may offer different challenges.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Home - Sothampton, Boat - Gosport
    Posts
    10,283

    Default Re: Lazyjacks re-think

    +1.

    When I wanted to try lazyjacks, I got a length of polyprop washing line for a couple of quid and set something up. I then used them and adjusted until I was somewhere near right before doing it properly. The last thing I did was to add a line each side a little closer to the mast than the end of the first batten, which has helped, but not entirely cured the batten issue.
    Steve
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

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