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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,740

    Default Finding old fixings

    I'm asking for experiences with 'stud finders' or similar.

    Here's the task.... I have acquired several lengths of 'pre-loved' teak from Robbins, which are apparently from the Cutty Sark. These are substantial, about 175mm x 100mm x 3.6m. in New Money, and will need resawing. My pet 'wood butcher' is a little concerned about his b-i-g bandsaw and planer 'finding' broken-off fixings hidden in the wood and has advised that could be a costly experience.

    Could those who have faced a similar problem advise on the effectiveness of the likes of electronic 'stud finders', of which there are many offered on Amazon....?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    1,835

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    Quote Originally Posted by zoidberg View Post
    I'm asking for experiences with 'stud finders' or similar.

    Here's the task.... I have acquired several lengths of 'pre-loved' teak from Robbins, which are apparently from the Cutty Sark. These are substantial, about 175mm x 100mm x 3.6m. in New Money, and will need resawing. My pet 'wood butcher' is a little concerned about his b-i-g bandsaw and planer 'finding' broken-off fixings hidden in the wood and has advised that could be a costly experience.

    Could those who have faced a similar problem advise on the effectiveness of the likes of electronic 'stud finders', of which there are many offered on Amazon....?
    surely any fixings would be apparent from the outside

    PS dont use that name for him, its disrespectful of a tradesman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Shotley
    Posts
    845

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    Quote Originally Posted by zoidberg View Post
    I'm asking for experiences with 'stud finders' or similar.

    Here's the task.... I have acquired several lengths of 'pre-loved' teak from Robbins, which are apparently from the Cutty Sark. These are substantial, about 175mm x 100mm x 3.6m. in New Money, and will need resawing. My pet 'wood butcher' is a little concerned about his b-i-g bandsaw and planer 'finding' broken-off fixings hidden in the wood and has advised that could be a costly experience.

    Could those who have faced a similar problem advise on the effectiveness of the likes of electronic 'stud finders', of which there are many offered on Amazon....?
    A stud finder of known make, such as Bosch, will find anything big enough to hurt a bfo bandsaw.
    So do your best with a device, then use the saw, then thirdly you have a good idea about what there might be to knacker any planer blades.
    But 100x175 isn't so very humungous, you don't need huge sawmill size tools, just buy a circular saw, or saw table, and a planer from Screwfix or whoever and DIY.
    Also you won't be 'fretting' about someone else's precious machinery..

    What are you making? And will you have any offcuts looking for a good home?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Scotland.
    Posts
    14,456

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    I bought a bunch of "Pitch Pine" reclaimed floor boards from an old garage floor. Using a low cost electric plane I took the smallest layer off the top of the planks which also identified nail heads. It might help you.
    "'...contradictions .... are deliberate exercises in doublethink." Orwell from 1984

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    3,191

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    Or do it by hand saw and you will feel any obstructions as you go. Also in keeping with how the wood was originally felled and sawn.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,740

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    There are some good suggestions above...thanks. I'll try to use some of them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Benfleet Essex
    Posts
    1,132

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    When i had my workshop & big saws i often used to get people asking me if i could run timber through the saw or planer. They would always say "There's no nails in it i have checked". Nine times out of ten i would spot one either snapped off when being pulled or a screw hiding under a bung. If there are old nail holes visible dont assume the nail is out. Poke a sharp implement in the hole & check half of it isnt still there!
    Hit a nail with a bandsaw blade & its knackered. Hit one with a carbide tipped saw you may get away with it or its a new tooth or two to be brazed on. Either way it gets expensive.
    I learnt that sometimes it was easier to say no.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,740

    Default Re: Finding old fixings

    Thanks, Keith.

    I still have this 'pre-loved' teak lumber to resaw, but take your points. It would be unfair to ask my well-regarded joiner to mangle his machine with suspect material.

    The guys at Robbins Timber strongly recommend what they did, which is buy a 'Little Wizard II' metal detector. They were emphatic, even enthusiastic.... so I did.

    I'll do a survey with it myself, and mark anything I find. Then I'll invite my joiner to have a go. Then we'll decide whether he carves the stuff up, or I do!

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