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Thread: MG Spring 25

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    62

    Default MG Spring 25

    I am planning to buy a MG Spring 25, which has a winged keel and twin rudders. Can any one confirm that the rudders are designed to take the ground and support part of the weight of the boat? also does any one have details of the original promotional documentation or magazine boat reports?

    With thanks Kyn Leech

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    9,091

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    Quote Originally Posted by sutton sailor View Post
    I am planning to buy a MG Spring 25, which has a winged keel and twin rudders. Can any one confirm that the rudders are designed to take the ground and support part of the weight of the boat? also does any one have details of the original promotional documentation or magazine boat reports?

    With thanks Kyn Leech
    Watch BBC Howards Way, theSpring 25 was born in it.

    Brian
    Kddpowercentre VASR charge

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    In Oar
    Posts
    1,924

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    I worked for Northshore when the production of the MG's was taken over after the failure of MG Yachts Ltd.

    The boats whilst able to dry out were not intended for a drying mooring.

    Might be worth seeking out a later Northshore built boat (roughly from 1990 onwards) as they improved quality by: beefing up the laminate around the chain plate anchorages, upgraded mast and repositioning of the shroud chainplates.

    Great fun to sail but watch those angled side decks when she is upright.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,178

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    We had one and agree with e39mad, although as he worked for them he will know a lot more than me. Ours was a 1988 boat and we bought it around 1994.

    I have seen a few around recently in the marina and I think they still look great and modern. As with most boaters I suspect, I make a point of taking a special look at any models that I have owned previously, whenever I come across them. I have not seen any Spring 25's looking shabby, or old fashioned at least on the outside. If I recall correctly some were made for home completion, although I am sure someone will verify if I am right on that. They are light (hence flighty) boats and sail like a large dingy so early reefing is something to keep an eye on. It's easy to scare yourself in relatively moderate winds if you have full sails, but that's really just about knowing the boat. The Yanmar engine in ours was fine but struggled on a heavy head sea needing maximum revs to make progress. It could have been the prop however.

    All in all we have fond memories of our Spring 25 and never had any problems, nor any particularly negative comments about the build or any features. Great boat.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Atlantic
    Posts
    21,369

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    Cracking boats indeed. A friend of mine used to have a share in one, sailed with him on her quite a bit. He was a fan of never using the engine on what is a big dinghy so we used to enjoy sailing up the Hamble to the Jolly and back from Southsea without using any diesel. Including alongside a busy pub.
    Was also interesting coming back to Southsea from St Vasst in a near gale......

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    I have a 1988 Spring that I have on a swinging mooring in Plymouth. On the lowest spring tide she just takes the ground and sits there happily. As this doesn't happen daily Im not concerned, but wouldn't go for a completely drying mooring.
    Great fun boat with more room than you would think. There is another one here that the lad races, and I believe he does quite well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    Thanks to everyone who replied. The mooring I have is a swinging mooring on which I expect the boat will just touch down on for a short while on the bottom of low spring tides. So from the comments I expect it will be ok. Thanks again to all contributors. The one thing I noticed when I walked around the deck just in front and slightly to one side of the mast that the deck flexed slightly. Is this normal for this boat? I have heard of some boats having a layer of balsa wood included in the layup to provide strength with lightness, and that this balsa wood can turn to mush if it gets wet. Does anyone know if this type of layup was built into the MG Spring 25?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Home-Sidcup, boat-Lower Halstow, Kent, England
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: MG Spring 25

    I had one that I kept on a drying soft mud mooring. It was a disaster. The wing sank into the mud and the rudders didn't give enough support to keep it upright so it always laid over at an alarming angle. The problem was that it always tipped to starboard and rain water would overflow the locker hatch into the locker and find its way under the saloon flooring. I had to bail it out every time it had been raining. I dried it out on firm mud on a few occasions and it sat perfectly upright, although it would sit nose high.
    It was great fun to sail and went really well of the wind, but didn't point very well. As already said, they need to reef early. Accommodation was great for a boat of that size.

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