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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    North from the Nab about 10 miles
    Posts
    8,848

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    It.is of course nonsense to suggest that eelgrass could even survive in the fast flowing waters below Needs Ore Point. However Beaulieu River comes in one of the Solents SAC areas, so the anchoring ban is blanket across it. I'm off base at present but memory tells me this particular SAC extends from Calshot to some way towards Lymington, but not very far offshore but includes Beaulieu Estuary. As it is controlled by a Harbour Authority, anchoring bans can be imposed in the River Authority area, in a way they can not in the rest of the. SAC.

    Sadly we will continue to see this sort of thing increasingly as green hysteria develops. There are strong and very good reasons for some of it, but a great deal else has no real scientific basis. A great deal of it is based on the Precautionary Principle. This says that if something 'might' be damaged' it must be protected anyway. This much of the basis of the Studland anchorage argument. There is no evidence of actual damage by anchors, but the eelgrass must be protected anyway just in case.

    It's hard to argue that one because it only takes one expert to express concern about potential long term damage, which may never happen, for the greenies to jump in feet first demanding bans.

    Trouble is, as NE have admitted to me, nobody really knows enough about these hugely complex and largely invisible sub tidal eco-,systems, so let's manage and protect it anyway! If it inconveniences other members of the public, so what?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Eastern Atlantic seaboard
    Posts
    3,206

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Until last month I was aghast at the fees levied bu Salcombe, Dart and Yealm for anchoring. Then I visited St Vincente de la Barquera which has recently levied a 30 euro fee to hang off an uncomfortable buoy with no shoreside facilities. Given that there is a serviced pontoon 8 miles away at Llanes, it is no surprise the St V d l B buoys were entirely unoccupied on a Friday evening in August. Whether Solent sailors treat mooring / anchoring with such economic elasticity is somewhat doubtful.
    I'd rather be tethered to a pad eye than tethered to an iPad.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,345

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Giblets View Post
    I suspect a lot of this is caused by demographic changes. Nowadays most people want shore power, a decent mobile signal, the ability to walk ashore rather than pump up the flubber, decent showers, easy access to eateries/shops/pub, and so on.
    There is nothing wrong with selecting a marina berth. It is not my preferred option, but I can understand the attraction. I also do not think that a marina berth is a less skilled option. Squishing into a tight marina takes far more seamanship than dropping an anchor, in my view.

    However, when mentioning anchoring in even slightly difficult locations or conditions, even experienced cruising sailors are more often expressing surprise. There is an increasing view that anchoring becomes unsafe in strong winds and this even extends to modest forecasts such as 30 knots.

    Perhaps we can fix these perceptions with anchoring threads on forums such as this, or maybe not .

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    1,372

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Have to say the bottom of Beaulieu river is a nice spot and I was disappointed to read this thread. However the few times I have been we have only been charged twice for a mooring or anchoring down there and never had a problem getting in, even on busy weekends.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,804

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Getting into a tight marina berth - especially when playing their Joker of strong following winds and / or tides - is usually more tricky than getting to a swinging mooring buoy or anchoring, but I don't think that's the point here; the spot at the bottom of the river was just a ' free ' wild anchorage with nothing but a bit of shelter, the wildlife and a bit of mud to drop ones' hook.

    I have no doubt whatsoever that if my car broke down near Bucklers Hard and Montagu rolled up in a classic car, he'd want to see my credit card and have a few zero's off it for ' parking ' before offering directions or a local helps' number...
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    4,160

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Minchsailor View Post
    To be fair, the majority of Tobermory is very deep, and the moorings are in water of about 20m depth, so I'm not sure how many yachts would be anchoring in that area anyway (as a 'young lad' decades ago, I was the youngster tasked with helping to retrieve the anchor, and it was ****** hard work).
    THA have now introduced moorings in Aros as you have intimated Tobermory Bay is very deep. The best two anchorages were in Aros and a very narrow strip close to the waterfall. Now that Aros had gone I would suggest that there is an anchorage area in Tobermory Bay for approx half a dozen boats unless you are capable of anchoring in greater depths.

    This is typical of a number of anchorages in the more popular spots on the west coast.

    I'm old enough to remember anchoring off the Mishnish and over at Ledaig. These days are long gone.
    Donald

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    1,372

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    the spot at the bottom of the river was just a ' free ' wild anchorage with nothing but a bit of shelter, the wildlife and a bit of mud to drop ones' hook.
    :
    Not free, anchoring or using a mooring, unless you failed to get a visit from the harbour master's team

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,804

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    I know, but after having had one of their team trample from cockpit to cockpit at Bucklers Hard demanding fees and try to open our companionway hatch in early morning - the fee receipt was in the window as requested, I'm fairly sure he was after a peek - long gone now but like the food and beer leaves a lingering nasty taste.

    I'm afraid that is the lingering impression I have of Bucklers Hard, though I'm sure he and his staff are just grabbing mercenary types, not pervs, heaven forbid
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,504

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post


    There is an increasing view that anchoring becomes unsafe in strong winds and this even extends to modest forecasts such as 30 knots.

    A forecast of 30 knots will result in gust of 45 knots - whereas gusting 30 knots - at the masthead - implies a forecast of 20 knots (which will be much less at deck level).

    Most people who sail and anchor overnight do so at the weekend (with the wife and kids) and with a forecast of 30 knot (and those 45 knot gusts) will go to the mall, that weekend, and simply postpone their weekend on the water to the following week. In most place round the world we have sufficient knowledge ('Admiralty Pilots' are wonderful and are the basis for many cruising guides) that it should be possible to find an anchorage that is not subject to the full force of the forecast 30 knots and certainly not the gust of 45 knots.

    I constantly read of people who sat out 'named' storms - so what? We have sat out at anchor 'Storms' with 70 knot winds - and not seen winds greater than 10 knots in our chosen anchorage - that (to me) is what seaman ship is about - not empty boasts.

    It seems good seaman ship to use an anchorage with shelter as in the small yachts that most people here own the discomfort of yawing and hobby horse would make 45 knot gusts less than pleasurable. Obviously if you can afford a larger yacht that discomfort is diminished. Its easy to forget that many do not want nor need to invest in an 'Expedition' yacht.

    We are meant to enjoy sailing not see it as a challenge every night.

    Jonathan

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    2,421

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Aja View Post
    THA have now introduced moorings in Aros as you have intimated Tobermory Bay is very deep. The best two anchorages were in Aros and a very narrow strip close to the waterfall. Now that Aros had gone I would suggest that there is an anchorage area in Tobermory Bay for approx half a dozen boats unless you are capable of anchoring in greater depths.

    This is typical of a number of anchorages in the more popular spots on the west coast.

    I'm old enough to remember anchoring off the Mishnish and over at Ledaig. These days are long gone.
    Donald
    Yes, it is a shame that they have annexed Aros bay and could not leave it for those that liked to anchor in the quiet. It's not as if there is no more space in the bay so it just smacks of money grubby by removing anchoring space. We used to stop regularly in Tobermory but are now lucky to stop once a year if we have to. Shame really.
    Chris
    Out west.... (or in the office)

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