Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 49
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,346

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Can anyone suggest any practical steps that can be taken to appeal this type of anchoring ban?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    8,567

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by noelex View Post
    Can anyone suggest any practical steps that can be taken to appeal this type of anchoring ban?
    If you are referring to the Beaulieu River I suspect the chances are zero owing to the terms of ownership of same. You could always try writing a note to Lord Montagu!
    Gosport NCI - Call us on Ch 65 for a radio check if passing.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,935

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    A forecast of 30 knots will result in gust of 45 knots - whereas gusting 30 knots - at the masthead - implies a forecast of 20 knots (which will be much less at deck level).

    Most people who sail and anchor overnight do so at the weekend (with the wife and kids) and with a forecast of 30 knot (and those 45 knot gusts) will go to the mall, that weekend, and simply postpone their weekend on the water to the following week. In most place round the world we have sufficient knowledge ('Admiralty Pilots' are wonderful and are the basis for many cruising guides) that it should be possible to find an anchorage that is not subject to the full force of the forecast 30 knots and certainly not the gust of 45 knots.

    I constantly read of people who sat out 'named' storms - so what? We have sat out at anchor 'Storms' with 70 knot winds - and not seen winds greater than 10 knots in our chosen anchorage - that (to me) is what seaman ship is about - not empty boasts.

    It seems good seaman ship to use an anchorage with shelter as in the small yachts that most people here own the discomfort of yawing and hobby horse would make 45 knot gusts less than pleasurable. Obviously if you can afford a larger yacht that discomfort is diminished. Its easy to forget that many do not want nor need to invest in an 'Expedition' yacht.

    We are meant to enjoy sailing not see it as a challenge every night.

    Jonathan
    Jonathan, your anchorages must be blessed with a lot more vegetation (trees) than most in the Outer Hebrides. With us, it's easy to find good anchorages, sheltered from waves and currents, but shelter from the wind - much less so. In strong wind conditions, I actually prefer being behind and around low-lying land, so that the wind, though strong, is steady. I find that in these conditions, being anchored behind steep hills gives squalls from varying directions. (Sorry, I know that this has nothing to do with a river in the south of England).

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    SPAIN,Galicia
    Posts
    12,720

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Quiddle View Post
    Until last month I was aghast at the fees levied bu Salcombe, Dart and Yealm for anchoring. Then I visited St Vincente de la Barquera which has recently levied a 30 euro fee to hang off an uncomfortable buoy with no shoreside facilities. Given that there is a serviced pontoon 8 miles away at Llanes, it is no surprise the St V d l B buoys were entirely unoccupied on a Friday evening in August. Whether Solent sailors treat mooring / anchoring with such economic elasticity is somewhat doubtful.
    At one time yachts were completely overlooked as the harbours were used for fishing boats but someone has given them the idea that yachtsmen are rich!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,806

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    Jonathan, your anchorages must be blessed with a lot more vegetation (trees) than most in the Outer Hebrides. With us, it's easy to find good anchorages, sheltered from waves and currents, but shelter from the wind - much less so. In strong wind conditions, I actually prefer being behind and around low-lying land, so that the wind, though strong, is steady. I find that in these conditions, being anchored behind steep hills gives squalls from varying directions. (Sorry, I know that this has nothing to do with a river in the south of England).
    I've sheltered in gales at anchor a few times at Studland - the only snag is the wind ' rotors ' down from the high hills giving cata- wotsit downwards blowing gusts, so as the boat heels she presents more rig area to blow on, never got hairy just ' interesting '.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    hampshire, uk
    Posts
    970

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Telstarr View Post
    The loss of this anchorage is very sad... we spent many years sailing the Solent, and as much as we loved anchoring at Newtown Creek, once the season got going, it was always too crowded for our taste, and Beaulieu was our second favourite as it hardly ever seemed to be too crowded. Really enjoyed that anchorage at HW springs when the sand bar was just awash and you felt you were anchored in the Solent but with untroubled waters, watching the comings and goings of the big ships and tall sail boats.

    I'm surprised this thread is not getting more reaction considering the number of Solent users on this forum. But then, perhaps it tells us something about the ratio of those that anchor (who are perhaps in decline?) versus those that prefer a marina or picking up a mooring. Of course, when good anchorages are lost to moorings, it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy.

    The mooring buoy cost, although not ideal. is not the main concern in Beaulieu as you had to pay to anchor anyway... £6 back in 2013 if my memory serves me correct... more last year I assume? So £15 for the mooring is not outrageous. It's about loosing that choice of exactly where you would like to drop your hook and spend the night, loosing that skill on where best to pick your anchoring spot etc. Also, in a storm (we once rode out F9 in Chi Harbour, unruffled) we would always prefer to lie to our own anchor rather than a mooring whose maintenance is unknown.

    I suppose the upside of this trend is that 'which anchor' threads on this forum will be a thing of the past within a few years!
    I agree: a shame to loose the choice. I do like the lower end of the Beaulieu river for an alternative to Newtown if I don't want to go ashore.


    I agree price is not the only consideration and do use the buoys when free but they are a finite number and when occupied are full whereas anchoring can be somewhat elastic with boats lying between other boats and rarely full.


    On the one hand there are plenty of buoys in the reach between Ginns and Beaulieu river SC that are rarely used but they are unlikely to lay more buoys further down.


    The river bed is privately owned so an appeal un likely to succeed but the eel grass argument is spurious: is there actually eel grass there and of course they are extending the Bucklers hard marina: what environmental impact unless this is some sort of "offset" arrangement.


    Perhaps we can visit their stand at SIBS and voice concern?

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,504

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    Jonathan, your anchorages must be blessed with a lot more vegetation (trees) than most in the Outer Hebrides. With us, it's easy to find good anchorages, sheltered from waves and currents, but shelter from the wind - much less so. In strong wind conditions, I actually prefer being behind and around low-lying land, so that the wind, though strong, is steady. I find that in these conditions, being anchored behind steep hills gives squalls from varying directions. (Sorry, I know that this has nothing to do with a river in the south of England).
    Norman,

    I was responding to an earlier post which seemed to be critical of those unwilling to anchor when there is a 30 knot wind forecast.


    We have a mix of anchorages, some with dense woods and some as you describe - with low land between the anchorage and the ocean. We, at the extreme, are only just beyond 40 degree south and we still have decent trees (sometimes ) or can go and find them (when the forecast is 70 knots). One big difference - our stronger winds come from Antarctica and though we are not a far south a you are north - your winds are kept warmer by the Gulf Stream - No palm trees on the west coast of Tasmania!

    But most people with yachts don't stray far - they day sail in local waters, anchor overnight (when its clement) and then its back to work on Monday. If the weather is bad - they stay at home. I find the idea of treating sailing as a pleasure an admirable trait. There is a surefire way of ensuring you sail alone - take the wife and children (or grandchildren) out for the night in a yacht sized as owned by members here (35' plus or minus?) to an exposed anchorage with a 30 knot forecast.

    We have retired and have much free time and sail a, good, few thousand NM a year - but we have no schedule and we see no need to challenge the weather by anchoring in the full force of forecast winds - it does not matter if there are trees (or not) but if you seek shelter then the wind at deck level will be much less than at the masthead. No-one is awarding medals (or more importantly a good night's sleep) for anchoring fully exposed to 30 knots - when a few NM away there is a more sheltered anchorage. We do anchor with wind at the masthead of 30 knots - but its more like 15 knots at deck level, as even a 10m high bit of land offers shelter (and I don't consider that as being at anchor in 30 knots - in fact its unremarkable).

    Jonathan

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,935

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    I've sheltered in gales at anchor a few times at Studland - the only snag is the wind ' rotors ' down from the high hills giving cata- wotsit downwards blowing gusts, so as the boat heels she presents more rig area to blow on, never got hairy just ' interesting '.
    We were laid over (I was going to say flat, but not quite) by a williwaw which came hurtling down Beinn Dhubh, a steep sided 1000ft hill in West Harris. We only had the Genoa up, but found it rather difficult to round up to a squall which was coming almost vertically down. I got my feet wet, standing at the helm.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,346

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    it's easy to find good anchorages, sheltered from waves and currents, but shelter from the wind - much less so.
    Sorry for the drift on a thread with the important subject of saving anchorages, but I agree. I don’t want beginners to be left with the impression that they can typically expect anything like a maximum of only 10 knots when 70 knots is forecast, no matter how much seamanship they have. That applies to both Australia and the UK.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,806

    Default Re: Anchoring ban in Beaulieu River

    noelex,

    what do you mean - anyone novice or experienced will be seeking shelter if they hear 70 knots forecast, I don't get the ' expect 10 knots ' ?
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to