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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shoreham - up the river without a paddle.
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Crinan12 View Post
    Thanks purdie, I didn't realise navionics did that. I treated it like a paper chart and though you had to add the height of tide.
    Yes, it nearly caught me out just there. Thankfully a dose of rationality made me look at a paper chart to check.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Nelson New Zealand
    Posts
    588

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    SAPurdies post is the best yet.
    I would reinfoce the bit about (not)shouting at crew.
    When briefing new crew i do tell them that:
    - we dont do shouting!
    - we dont do blame!
    - If the skipper happens to momentarily forget these points it is your duty to remind him.

    If you want your partner to sail with you, do everything you can to avoid scaring them off while remembering that your partner may have a much lower risk /fear threshhold than you.
    As for the dinghy arguement: I sailed/raced dinghies for years, but it is much easier in some ways to teach sailing on a 20-30 ft boat which you can sail like a large dinghy. Assuming a light to moderate breeze, this allows the student to make mistakes that in a dinghy would lead to an unexpected swim. The larger boat reacts a little slower allowing time and space for the instructor to retrieve the error.
    Final advice: Only ever approach a jetty or dock as fast as you are comfortable hitting it in the event of engine failure!

    Have fun!
    Aiming to live forever or die in the attempt!

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,555

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by John the kiwi View Post


    Final advice: Only ever approach a jetty or dock as fast as you are comfortable hitting it in the event of engine failure!
    But (coz there is always a but!) Remember you can only steer while you are make headway. So dropping to 0.2knot 200m away from the dock (to follow the advice above) and needing to turn will NOT work!

    Short bursts of power are the answer. But it feel wierd (or it does to me!)

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    1,323

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by thinwater View Post
    Olympic athletes don't faff around... not all the time. I've done both. Dinghies teach you how to sail. Yachts teach you systems. Go straight to a yacht and you miss something, forever. I had not been on a beach cat in 25 years, until last week. I had owned one for 12 years and sailed it hard. As soon as the wind gave it (Prindle 19--a 19' Tornado clone with Mylar sails) a kick it all came back and I remembered why I missed it.
    This man has it right. Exactly what I would have recommended: get a week or two's worth of proper lessons in a dinghy (no, your mate who can sail isn't the right person) and once you understand what your dinghy wants to do (and what you need to do to go in the right direction, start and stop) you can then move on to your J24. Don't underestimate the starting and stopping; berthing is the time when you will do the most damage to yours/others boats.

    J24? Nice boat, but really is a racing keel boat with the agility of a dinghy and the liabilities of a cruiser. Great racing class but poor for actual cruisability. It will do most things that a dinghy will do but hurt your hands more.

    But whatever you do, get some proper lessons. Spend your hard-earned cash on proper lessons delivered at an RYA approved centre. You will be pleased you did.
    Last edited by langstonelayabout; 15-09-19 at 09:20. Reason: typo

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Me; Nth County Dublin, Boat;Malahide
    Posts
    848

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by langstonelayabout View Post
    This man has it right. Exactly what I would have recommended: get a week or two's worth of proper lessons in a dinghy (no, your mate who can sail isn't the right person) and once you understand what your dinghy wants to do (and what you need to do to go in the right direction, start and stop) you can then move on to your J24. Don't underestimate the starting and stopping; berthing is the time when you will do the most damage to yours/others boats.

    J24? Nice boat, but really is a racing keel boat with the agility of a dinghy and the liabilities of a cruiser. Great racing class but poor for actual cruisability. It will do most things that a dinghy will do but hurt your hands more.

    But whatever you do, get some proper lessons. Spend your hard-earned cash on proper lessons delivered at an RYA approved centre. You will be pleased you did.
    +1. Formal instruction introduces good habits from the start, and you will learn perhaps three times faster than you you would by trial and error etc.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Me; Nth County Dublin, Boat;Malahide
    Posts
    848

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by John the kiwi View Post
    SAPurdies post is the best yet.
    I would reinfoce the bit about (not)shouting at crew.
    When briefing new crew i do tell them that:
    - we dont do shouting!
    - we dont do blame!
    - If the skipper happens to momentarily forget these points it is your duty to remind him.

    If you want your partner to sail with you, do everything you can to avoid scaring them off while remembering that your partner may have a much lower risk /fear threshhold than you.
    As for the dinghy arguement: I sailed/raced dinghies for years, but it is much easier in some ways to teach sailing on a 20-30 ft boat which you can sail like a large dinghy. Assuming a light to moderate breeze, this allows the student to make mistakes that in a dinghy would lead to an unexpected swim. The larger boat reacts a little slower allowing time and space for the instructor to retrieve the error.
    Final advice: Only ever approach a jetty or dock as fast as you are comfortable hitting it in the event of engine failure!

    Have fun!
    +1. I never sailed dinghies. My first lessons were at a sailing school in Croatia on what I later realised were 30', one-design racers. After that, most of my learning was on 19' open keelboats, which, when I rose to instructor level, I came to really appreciate for their handiness and manoeuverability. The J24 would similarly be fun to sail. Given the right tuition you should be able to pick up a mooring buoy or come alongside a pier or pontoon under sail, a good skill to have when relying on an outboard😀.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    On the Celtic Fringe
    Posts
    14,337

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    I am in the school of thought that does not thing you need to spend any time in a dingy, unless you want to end up cold and wet.

    Find some people who are willing to teach you how to do the tricky stuff, coming alongside or picking up a mooring, or get an instructor for a few days tuition.

    Recently I did Powerboat II and found it interesting but taught me no new lessions, but it might help somebody new to sailing. The fast bits of the course are just a tad scary for this old salt.
    Cynical Scottish very nearly retired engineer who sails a Gib'Sea 96.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Second Coast, Ross-shire, overlooking Gruinard Bay.
    Posts
    7,386

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Chipping-in late, a long way through the thread, so apologies:-
    I learnt to sail on dinghies, then the family bought two cruisers (not at the same time )
    Being the youngest I was somewhat relegated to foredeck, lines, galley etc so never had any real experience of motor-handling/berthing etc., until I bought my own 9m sloop after 30 years "ashore".
    I single-hand all the time, so it gives me a really warm feeling when I get the above manoeuvres right - which is by no means consistent.

    To the OP, enjoy learning, be humble about mistakes and get satisfaction from successes
    Kay Sarah Sarah
    57°51.42' N 5°29.44' W

  9. #59
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Second Coast, Ross-shire, overlooking Gruinard Bay.
    Posts
    7,386

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by William_H View Post
    I think the real need is to discuss with your crew and prepare yourself mentally for the stresses of sailing when things go wrong. If you take your wife then expect things to get difficult. You and especially your wife have to try to see the learning as fun and disasters as good learning. Just try to contain your own yelling at the crew. They are the most important and valuable component of any boat. Mind their feelings. ol'will
    On that theme, to my undying regret, I scared the pants (not literally!) off my partner the first time she sailed with me. She's a non-swimmer and the conditions got a bit (only a bit) lively, but the boat heeled quite far and I hadn't thought to warn her of this.
    She has never got over it and now won't sail with me.
    No amount of science, hearsay or bravado that the boat boat won't sink will do any good in making her more confident.
    Very sad, because she loves seeing me sail the boat (from the shore) and knows the fun, pleasure and sense of achievement I get from challenging conditions.

    So,OP, DON'T frighten your crew by subjecting them to unexpected terrors, which are usually "just normal sailing".

    Good luck, enjoy the never-ending learning experience.
    Kay Sarah Sarah
    57°51.42' N 5°29.44' W

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Grimsby
    Posts
    642

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by langstonelayabout View Post
    This man has it right. Exactly what I would have recommended: get a week or two's worth of proper lessons in a dinghy (no, your mate who can sail isn't the right person) and once you understand what your dinghy wants to do (and what you need to do to go in the right direction, start and stop) you can then move on to your J24. Don't underestimate the starting and stopping; berthing is the time when you will do the most damage to yours/others boats.

    J24? Nice boat, but really is a racing keel boat with the agility of a dinghy and the liabilities of a cruiser. Great racing class but poor for actual cruisability. It will do most things that a dinghy will do but hurt your hands more.

    But whatever you do, get some proper lessons. Spend your hard-earned cash on proper lessons delivered at an RYA approved centre. You will be pleased you did.
    +1
    "Now shall the gentleman haul and draw with the mariner"
    John Hawkins

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