Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 81
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Muchalls
    Posts
    1,247

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Couple more idea to add to the good advice above.
    Consider some training RYA Day Skipper or Competent Crew if you want to reinforce the basics.
    Also, join the Westerly Owners Association, link here https://westerly-owners.co.uk/
    Lots of help and advice available, some good contacts and a helpful bunch to know. They can put you in touch with others sailing the same boat - maybe some near you? = who would be happy to meet and share ideas.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Muchalls
    Posts
    1,247

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    I confess to being confused.

    The yacht is described as a Westerly J24. Did Westerly licence the manufacture of J24s?

    On the assumption its a 'real' J24 - a J24 was our first keel yacht and its hardly what I might describe as racy. Its only racy when sailed properly and with strict attention to wind and trim (and its an excellent yacht on which to start).

    North Sails produced some excellent (they were tape then) videos on sail trim (on a J24) - I think they are on Youtube now - study them (try googling 'North Sail J24 Sail Trim'). We raced and cruised ours - with very indifferent success at the racing - but was a harsh learning process - and encouraged us to move up to a X99, where we had better success in inshore races.

    Jonathan
    Can't answer your query re the J24 offhand and a bad knee prevents me going upstairs to get my copy of The Westerly Story by Peter Poland which would surely have the answer. And, a copy is free to anyone joining the WOA as above.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    36,577

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by prv View Post

    Also, as someone who started sailing in dinghies, I suggest you ignore the advice to do the same.
    I'd agree; my wife and I bought our first sailboat (Westerly Centaur) having never been anywhere near a dinghy. We hired a local instructor to show us the basics, then after maybe 10 hours with his guidance, set off on our own. 40 years on, and still learning!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,426

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Yes, Westerly were licenced to build the J24.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    1) Force four (13-18mph) is quite enough to be going on with for the first few times - watch the forecast;
    2) once in clear water learn to heave-to; learn how your boat likes to be hove-to;
    3) know the tidal stream where you're sailing, and learn how to cope with wind-over-tide situations

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Alness / Black Isle Northern Scottish Highlands.
    Posts
    9,223

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    We skipped the dinghy sailing stage, I am of the opinion sailing is a dry sport (at least does not require wearing a wet or dry suit) and one should not expect to capsize or end up in the water. But we do sail mostly in small cruisers that are often referred to as "a large dinghy with a lid"

    Our biggest "steep learning curve" was our third ever trip out. It was a bit more windy than we had been out in before. We sailed downwind for several miles having a very pleasant sail. Then we turned up wind to go back and bugger me that was lively. On that occasion we could not cope with the conditions so we got the sails down and motored back slamming all the way into large waves. That taught us to respect the wind and sea conditions, and that it can be a lot harder (or at least a lot less comfortable and a lot wetter) sailing upwind in a blow. Which also teaches the other point, if you are sailing upwind and struggling, then if you can, turn off the wind a bit for something less challenging,

    If your OB does not have a remote tank, then make sure you refill it's tank whenever you have chance and a bit of sea room. Trust me, the time for it to run out of fuel is not 100 metres from the harbour entrance in a gale. And that leads to the next point, know how to deploy your anchor quickly!!!!!

    Make sure you know how to reef your sails, and practice doing so. The old saying is the time to reef is some time before you think it is.
    Last edited by ProDave; 14-09-19 at 14:37.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Solent
    Posts
    548

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Amulet View Post
    If you are agile enough do learn to sail in a dinghy - don't listen to those who say otherwise. I've sailed with many dozens of people, and it is rare for those who have no dinghy experience to have the wind sense of a dinghy sailor. I had a crew member with nothing but Optimist experience (lots). Within a day she was about the best windward helm I've had aboard.

    Boat handling: remember that you are always sailing if there is wind - even if you have no sails up. Put your motor in neutral in clear sea in a breeze. Note how she behaves. Learn, using transits, that, due to wind and current, the boat is not always travelling it the direction she is pointing in, develop a feel for this, and use it when manoeuvring.
    I agree with this about dinghy sailing. Went sailing with a chap a couple of years ago who was trying to learn to sail on a 40ft AWB. He couldn't tell where the wind was and consequently couldn't helm at all. It's a bit like trying to learn to ride a motorbike without having first learnt to ride a bike.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Scarborough
    Posts
    607

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnalison View Post
    Learning to go slowly is certainly the key. You can always pick out those without confidence entering a harbour because they always go too fast because they are afraid of losing control. Boats always obey the laws of physics, even those with long keels.
    What do you mean, "even" boats with long keels? They obey the laws of physics better .
    ( The keels can't stall ).
    "Now shall the gentleman haul and draw with the mariner"
    John Hawkins

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Scarborough
    Posts
    607

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    To the OP, just have a go at all the common points of sail ( sailing with the wind blowing from different angles, eg a beam reach, running downwind including gybing, and close hauled including tacking.Try heaving to, and try tacking out of it and gybing out of it. Reefing of course, you can practice that in harbour.
    You don't need the engine, or any navigation, to try these out, it's very satisfying, you will learn a lot quickly..and free.. and all the manoevres can be found in books.
    You need wind to sail, but not too strong. It's really good fun picking up these skills, people have been doing the same actions for 1000's of years, and you will feel like Nelson at the end of the day
    Last edited by Ohlin Karcher; 14-09-19 at 17:01.
    "Now shall the gentleman haul and draw with the mariner"
    John Hawkins

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Scarborough
    Posts
    607

    Default Re: Tips you'd like to have known when you first got your boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by SlowlyButSurely View Post
    I agree with this about dinghy sailing. Went sailing with a chap a couple of years ago who was trying to learn to sail on a 40ft AWB. He couldn't tell where the wind was and consequently couldn't helm at all. It's a bit like trying to learn to ride a motorbike without having first learnt to ride a bike.
    I agree with that.
    "Now shall the gentleman haul and draw with the mariner"
    John Hawkins

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to