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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Staffy Cher
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    After grinding back the rust ďspotsĒ this weekend Iíve got more spots than actual keel.

    I think Iíd like to go the whole hog and get it blasted and epoxied again.

    Any recommendations for someone whoíd be happy to travel to Bradwell Marina?

    4B3E2C17-D210-4DED-B674-CFB9EC32938B.jpg
    Sailing in a windy Scotland www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_-AJqWB9Ks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Bradwell and Leigh-on-Sea
    Posts
    14,490

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Althorne Marine, based in the marina, do blasting on site. John Rook 07939 100822.
    Not all who wander are lost

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Staffy Cher
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Thanks Moody Sabre. Althorne have just started to offer sandblasting to remove antifoul according to their site but not grit or whatever to remove epoxy down to the keel but I’ll give them a call if I can’t find anyone else.

    ___________________
    Sailing in a windy Scotland www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_-AJqWB9Ks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Burnham-on-Crouch, UK
    Posts
    592

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Hi Shaun,

    Sand, grit, not a lot of difference. I'm sure if they have experience in blasting yachts they will take off whatever you ask them to, leaving you a rust free keel and a nicely matted gel coat below the waterline,

    To make your next epoxy job last, give the keel a good pressure wash with fresh water straight after blasting (to get the chlorides out of the pores of the cast iron, as far as possible) and another quick blast to remove the gingering and dry the keel (blasting warms it up). Once dry, get the first coat of epoxy primer on, using a primer designed to be tolerant of moisture and a little rust. I used to use 3M 152LV, but I understand that's no longer available, since their plant in Northallerton closed - I believe there are lookalikes available. This epoxy will serve as a barrier coat for the hull below the waterline as well.

    If you're going for Coppercoat, don't fall for the story that the Coppercoat will serve as a barrier coat. It is copper particles bound in an epoxy, so it is epoxy, but it won't be waterproof. If water could not migrate into (and out of) the paint along the surface of the Cu particles, it wouldn't work as an antifoul. A decent epoxy primer is, in my view, an essential part of a Coppercoat job, I don't want to pay Coppercoat prices to see it fall off in chunks a couple of years later, so a sound substrate is essential.

    Peter.

    Peter

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,417

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Have a word with the marina. There is a chap from Mayland ( It may be Brown & Sons but I may be mistaken on that) who does work for them on a regular basis. He did my hull & left a very small amount of antifoul on the hull which took me a day (approx 7 hours) to remove. This meant that there was absolutely no damage to the gel coat and extra epoxy coats etc was unnecessary.

    He did leave a 50mm strip at the waterline to avoid damage to the hull & this took ages to remove !!!
    Cash on completion is advisable; as is being in attendance during the works, so that you can agree extent of removal. He is very wary of removing too much & doing any damage (Unlike some).

    Note that the marina insist on it being done in a "dirty" area as they will not allow any dust near other boats. You may need to have your boat moved. I pre arranged to have my boat positioned straight away on lift out.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Staffy Cher
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWright View Post
    Hi Shaun,

    Sand, grit, not a lot of difference. I'm sure if they have experience in blasting yachts they will take off whatever you ask them to, leaving you a rust free keel and a nicely matted gel coat below the waterline,

    To make your next epoxy job last, give the keel a good pressure wash with fresh water straight after blasting (to get the chlorides out of the pores of the cast iron, as far as possible) and another quick blast to remove the gingering and dry the keel (blasting warms it up). Once dry, get the first coat of epoxy primer on, using a primer designed to be tolerant of moisture and a little rust. I used to use 3M 152LV, but I understand that's no longer available, since their plant in Northallerton closed - I believe there are lookalikes available. This epoxy will serve as a barrier coat for the hull below the waterline as well.

    If you're going for Coppercoat, don't fall for the story that the Coppercoat will serve as a barrier coat. It is copper particles bound in an epoxy, so it is epoxy, but it won't be waterproof. If water could not migrate into (and out of) the paint along the surface of the Cu particles, it wouldn't work as an antifoul. A decent epoxy primer is, in my view, an essential part of a Coppercoat job, I don't want to pay Coppercoat prices to see it fall off in chunks a couple of years later, so a sound substrate is essential.

    Peter.

    Peter
    Thanks Peter,

    That is exactly the mistake I made out of ignorance last time thinking it was just the same as an epoxy primer.

    Iíve spoken to Althorne Marine as the only people out of four who answered the phone on Wednesday and theyíre going to take a look at it and were supposedly getting back to me today.

    They too have mentioned it will need to be moved to another part of the yard but they can epoxy too. My keel has quite a wide base for its size but they may be able to lift it in the slings while they blast and coat the base.

    My Coppercoat isnít actually Coppercoat but one of the alternatives.

    It seems to perform as well as the antifoul on my Jag 24 when they were both in the Crouch together.

    _____________________
    Sailing in a windy Scotland www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_-AJqWB9Ks

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    9,751

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterWright View Post
    Hi Shaun,

    Sand, grit, not a lot of difference. I'm sure if they have experience in blasting yachts they will take off whatever you ask them to, leaving you a rust free keel and a nicely matted gel coat below the waterline,

    To make your next epoxy job last, give the keel a good pressure wash with fresh water straight after blasting (to get the chlorides out of the pores of the cast iron, as far as possible) and another quick blast to remove the gingering and dry the keel (blasting warms it up). Once dry, get the first coat of epoxy primer on, using a primer designed to be tolerant of moisture and a little rust. I used to use 3M 152LV, but I understand that's no longer available, since their plant in Northallerton closed - I believe there are lookalikes available. This epoxy will serve as a barrier coat for the hull below the waterline as well.

    If you're going for Coppercoat, don't fall for the story that the Coppercoat will serve as a barrier coat. It is copper particles bound in an epoxy, so it is epoxy, but it won't be waterproof. If water could not migrate into (and out of) the paint along the surface of the Cu particles, it wouldn't work as an antifoul. A decent epoxy primer is, in my view, an essential part of a Coppercoat job, I don't want to pay Coppercoat prices to see it fall off in chunks a couple of years later, so a sound substrate is essential.

    Peter.

    Peter
    Just to say that is some of the best advice I have seen on this forum.

    In merchant shipping we spend a lot of time blasting, pressure washing and epoxying (ships are steel...!) and the usual blasting specification for the first coat of epoxy is "S.A. 2.5". Any blasting contractor will know what this is (it's a Swedish standard but everyone uses it.)

    The pictures here may help:

    http://www.bcc-blasting.com/docs/Sta...ISO_8501_1.pdf
    Last edited by Kukri; 20-09-19 at 11:11.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Burnham-on-Crouch, UK
    Posts
    592

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Quote Originally Posted by Minn View Post
    In merchant shipping we spend a lot of time blasting, pressure washing and epoxying (ships are steel...!) and the usual blasting specification for the first coat of epoxy is "S.A. 2.5". Any blasting contractor will know what this is (it's a Swedish standard but everyone uses it.)
    The operative phrase there is "ships are steel" - you will never get a S.A. 2.5 finish on cast iron, the material is just too rough and porous. The only ay to be sure of excluding chlorides from cast iron is to avoid ever exposing it to a chloride environment *salt water or even salty air). In my previous post, where I wrote "as far as possible", I should have written "as far as reasonably practicable" - you never will get rid of all the chlorides once this porous material has started rusting in sea water, but I've seen formerly rusty keels last 10 years before rust reappears after the blast / wash / reblast approach. A lot actually depends on how porous the original casting is, and you can rarely infer that from the make of yacht as most builders buy in the keel castings and change supplier from time to time, sometimes with a consequential change of quality.

    Peter.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Staffy Cher
    Posts
    2,777

    Default Re: Recommendations for Keel Blasting near Bradwell

    Thanks for the input guys.

    A quick update for future readers.

    Bradwell Marina will now only let Althorne Marine blast on their site. The boat has to be lifted to an area on the far side of the site (£100.00 each way) to avoid getting other boats dirty.

    I have spoken to John but not had a quote back after nearly 3 weeks and the weather isnít getting any more conducive so Iíve decided to do a lash up myself.

    Iíve ground back with a flap wheel on the grinder and then treated with hydrochloric acid. Then Iíve jet washed and let dry and then ground back again and slapped the first coat of zinc rich epoxy primer on within 20-40 minutes.

    Iíve not done all of it yet but hope to do the rest next time Iím down

    Iíll cover it with a couple of coats of C Guard copper antifoul and hope that lot will make do next season when Iím planning to be in the Solent so will have a bit more of a choice.

    _____________________________
    Sailing in a windy Scotland www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_-AJqWB9Ks

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