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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    671

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit (of Glenans) View Post
    The #1 reef looks to have no slack in it, but it's not affecting the situation, because you can see a curve in the luff above it.
    Yes, possibly because the 2nd reef line is also tight. I'd have thought the first thing to do, before anything else, is to make sure all reefing lines are slack.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat (now back in) the Clyde
    Posts
    5,649

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Quote Originally Posted by Spirit (of Glenans) View Post
    The #1 reef looks to have no slack in it, but it's not affecting the situation, because you can see a curve in the luff above it.
    The over tight reef 1 is definitely causing part of the problem, as the sag in the luff is much more pronounced below it than it is above it. So definitely needs easing (try it with six inches slack to be sure).
    And as others have said, perhaps reef 2 line is over tight, or kicker and/or mainsheet left tight when hoisting.
    Once these are sorted, fitting a simple block and tackle on the Cunningham would be a good idea.

    But it is important to see the shape of the full sail. Horizontal creases don’t slow a boat down, if the sail shape is correct - have a look at many Olympic dinghy classes which often have lots of horizontal creases in certain wind conditions (to get absolute maximum area available in light winds). But sail curvature too far back upwind causes excess heeling and drag so is very slow - hence freeing the reef lines and fitting/using a cunningham control could be very beneficial to maintain sail shape in a breeze upwind.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    1,317

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy View Post
    Can you drop your three season sails round to me and other deserving cruising sailors please?
    When I raced hard my 3 season old sails were absolutely ‘naughty word here-ed’ and you would have been welcome to them.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Southampton
    Posts
    35,606

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Quote Originally Posted by flaming View Post
    1st off, ignore the stuff about the tack being too high. I don't buy that, looks fine to me. If that was an issue I'd expect a massive crease from the start of the shelf diagonally up to the luff, i.e the foot line being pulled up out of the boom. We don't see that, so I'm not seeing that as an issue.
    It's not an issue in itself, the point is that it might be making the effective luff of the sail just long enough for the halyard to "bottom out" in the sheave at the masthead. We don't know since the photos don't show the whole sail.

    Pete

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    I agree with flaming. That tack cutout is designed that way, meant to be like that, there's no particular reason it directly affects luff tension.

    Otherwise lots of good suggestions and I would be interested to know what works! My money is on too much leech tension while hoisting due to too much kicker/mainsheet/reefing pennant tension.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    711

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    If you have luff tension and a jammer not slipping. Ease luff reef pennant .
    It looks to me as if Tack cut away is not correct .
    Remove last three slides from mast . Let the tack eye sit further aft, on a lashing if necessary. It Should sit around 45 degrees away from bearing point.
    Set the sail and see if creases go away ..if they ,do measure the slide offset and refit the slides at correct span..

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Quote Originally Posted by flaming View Post
    I'm sure that this is teaching granny to suck eggs, but ...
    Many excellent replies here - plenty for me to be going along with, so hopefully I'll do better under sail tomorrow.

    Just to address flaming's words above, you should never assume such a thing of me. I've only been sailing a year and it's my first boat (at 40', I would accept the argument that it's too big for me, but that's not a constructive argument to have now).

    Many thanks, gentlefolks, I do appreciate all the help.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,436

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Take the shackle off the head of the sail. Double the halyard over & push a loop through the eye in the head of the sail.
    Take the free end of the halyard & pass it through the loop so that the loop is trapped in the eye. tie an overhand knot in the end of the halyard as a stopper .
    That will get you another inch or so height at the head of the sail when hoisting.
    then, as others have said, fasten the tack tight down to the gooseneck.
    Total, with luck, will give you about 3 inches of extra stretch.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Boat (now back in) the Clyde
    Posts
    5,649

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    Quote Originally Posted by KompetentKrew View Post
    Many excellent replies here - plenty for me to be going along with, so hopefully I'll do better under sail tomorrow..
    Good plan. If possible use a camera with telephoto lens and, of safe to do so, take a zoomed in photo of the masthead from 3-4 boat lengths away to see where the headboard is relative to the mast sheave.
    Also take a photo underway upwind, looking upwards from just behind the mast.
    Have a good sail.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    8,899

    Default Re: Lack of tension in tack of mainsail

    How is the sail attached at the top? I found that scrapping the bowline/shackle arrangement and tying the halyard on directly enabled a higher hoist and eliminated wrinkles. Use a halyard knot.

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