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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    8,566

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    The CG insist on lat and long positions. There are at least two reasons for this.
    1. Simple lack of local knowledge.
    2. Possible confusion due to multiple places having the same name.
    Plus you may be speaking to a control centre that is hundreds of miles away from the incident location so they rely on Lat & Long to locate the casualty on their charting systems. "Three miles south-west of Beachy Head" will mean nothing to an operator in Aberdeen!
    Gosport NCI - Call us on Ch 65 for a radio check if passing.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    8,566

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    You forgot to add
    3) Tick sheet does not have any squares for "range & bearings"
    They do certainly use the range and bearings that we give them from our lookout at Portsmouth Harbour entrance.
    Gosport NCI - Call us on Ch 65 for a radio check if passing.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    6,168

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by mjcoon View Post
    According to my home-made calculator:
    100000000000000 ^ (1/3)=46415.8883361278
    (where "^ (1/3)" means cube-root)

    So five thousand words should be enough, three at a time.

    Mike.
    I was assuming a place system associated with some sort of tesselation, so the three words represent a number in a system with a very large base. I don't know their system, so either of us could be right.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,935

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by Giblets View Post
    Plus you may be speaking to a control centre that is hundreds of miles away from the incident location so they rely on Lat & Long to locate the casualty on their charting systems. "Three miles south-west of Beachy Head" will mean nothing to an operator in Aberdeen!
    I thought I covered that in "1.".

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    2,734

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by AntarcticPilot View Post
    I was assuming a place system associated with some sort of tesselation, so the three words represent a number in a system with a very large base. I don't know their system, so either of us could be right.
    I still don't understand how you came up with your figure of 29,000,000 words, but I'm sure they don't use that many! And I do not know how they map their triplets of words onto the Earth, just that 5k x 5k x 5k is enough for your count of grid squares...

    Mike.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Oban
    Posts
    791

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by mjcoon View Post
    I still don't understand how you came up with your figure of 29,000,000 words, but I'm sure they don't use that many! And I do not know how they map their triplets of words onto the Earth, just that 5k x 5k x 5k is enough for your count of grid squares...

    Mike.
    The truth according to Wikipedia is somewhere inbetween. Wiki says there are 57 trillion (I think they mean 10^12) squares, needing 39,000 words ( that's ~(57x10^12)^(1/3)) to represent all land and sea squares.

    Derek

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Home - Sothampton, Boat - Gosport
    Posts
    10,372

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    WhatThreeWords is biased towards English speakers (I may be wrong about that, but if I am, it means that an English speaker receiving a French whatThreeWords might not recognize and be able to spell all the words, and vice-versa).

    I had a play with W3W in France and it gave me English words until I went into the settings and change the language to French, when it became fluently French, with French words for the same position. There's a long list of languages, which is what's needed for local use, but less than ideal for use at sea in the bits between language areas. Since English (or some variant thereof) is already the international language, if I couldn't speak the local language, I'd use the English version, spelling the words.

    Actually, I'd use lat/long. Most of the time, I think that using W3W at sea, especially by yotties who are familar with lat/long is a bit like using pliers to undo a bolt. Most of the time, you've got the right spanner to hand anyway, so why not just use it? The likelihood of having W3W and not having lat/long seems pretty remote. OTOH, If I'm hiking somewhere a bit remote and take a tumble, W3W is ideal, especially if I'm not familiar with lat/long.

    Incidentally, they use 40,000 words for a 3mX3m grid.
    Steve
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    8,566

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    I thought I covered that in "1.".
    Fair comment but some people do not actually realise they may not be speaking to Fareham NMOC.
    Gosport NCI - Call us on Ch 65 for a radio check if passing.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    993

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by biscuit View Post
    Is "What 3 Words" the way of the future? I'm surprised that there seems to have been little discussion of this innovative system on these forums.
    What three words depends on getting contact with the internet to tell you the words and is not that easy to use. It is intended for fixed installation when you only do it once, remember it, and read it back to the emergency operator. It is also commercial propietory etc. If you mispronounce it, it becomes more useless than lat/long as a single letter wrong could put you 12000 miles away not merely a few minutes of latitude ie miles.

    We were considering using it on the Railways for installation but I have challenged this and now we are doing something else for detailed positioning
    Last edited by oldmanofthehills; 20-09-19 at 09:49.
    A boat is for going places

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    6,168

    Default Re: Get your position right...

    Quote Originally Posted by cpedw View Post
    The truth according to Wikipedia is somewhere inbetween. Wiki says there are 57 trillion (I think they mean 10^12) squares, needing 39,000 words ( that's ~(57x10^12)^(1/3)) to represent all land and sea squares.

    Derek
    Quote Originally Posted by Stemar View Post
    WhatThreeWords is biased towards English speakers (I may be wrong about that, but if I am, it means that an English speaker receiving a French whatThreeWords might not recognize and be able to spell all the words, and vice-versa).

    I had a play with W3W in France and it gave me English words until I went into the settings and change the language to French, when it became fluently French, with French words for the same position. There's a long list of languages, which is what's needed for local use, but less than ideal for use at sea in the bits between language areas. Since English (or some variant thereof) is already the international language, if I couldn't speak the local language, I'd use the English version, spelling the words.

    Actually, I'd use lat/long. Most of the time, I think that using W3W at sea, especially by yotties who are familar with lat/long is a bit like using pliers to undo a bolt. Most of the time, you've got the right spanner to hand anyway, so why not just use it? The likelihood of having W3W and not having lat/long seems pretty remote. OTOH, If I'm hiking somewhere a bit remote and take a tumble, W3W is ideal, especially if I'm not familiar with lat/long.

    Incidentally, they use 40,000 words for a 3mX3m grid.
    Thanks for the clarifications. I wonder if the code used builds in some error correction.

    I completely agre with the assessment that it is useful in circumstances where lat/long are not in everyday use, and I am sure that some of my friends who volunteer for an organization called MapAction will be interested in its use - I remember being consulted many years ago about the utility of a tesselation based system for them; for a while I took an interest in tesseral addressing schemes and used one in a satellite data processing application.

    I looked up the number of words in an average person's vocabulary, and the answer came up at 20,000 words against a total in the OED of around 180,000 words. However, that must go down a lot when you remove homophones (e.g. which and witch, five and fife (the latter especially in the approved VHF pronunciation!)) and impose other rules such as (?) word length, part of speech (the examples I've seen only seem to use nouns and adjectives, but I haven't looked at many) and pronounceability. So 40,0000 words must involve the use of a lot of words that people don't recognize!

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