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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    25

    Default Outboard v Inboard/sterndrive

    I am beginning to think about downsizing boat size so we can more easily access the smaller Calas (we are based in Mallorca) and operate singlehanded etc.
    I am looking at around 10m day/weekend boat but am bothered by stern drives. The increasing trend for outboards rather appeals to me, easier maintenance, ease of lift out to minimise fouling and more Ďboatspaceí where inboard engines would be. Performance is not that important as long as could cruise along at 25 knots or so if needed, albeit mostly we currently bumble along at 10 knots. Most of the outboard boats I saw at the boat show would easily exceed my needs in terms of performance.
    I am interested to hear what other opinions there might be and if anyone has direct experience of twin outboard boats.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,016

    Default Re: Outboard v Inboard/sterndrive

    Hi

    Until very recently I was an inboard and 2 stroke outboard man all the way. No question.

    After deciding to put the special boat into storage for a rest...I decided to go for a fletcher sportscruiser 19. Always fancied one and knew it would be great for my needs and I wouldnít overly fuss about it like the other boat.
    I had always wanted an inboard one. Stick to what you know. Didnít want an outboard one and especially didnít want a heavy 4 stroke gutless outboard one...
    But. I came across a late model hull but had been recently fitted with the latest model mercury mariner CT 4 stroke outboard. I did a bit of research and couldnít believe what these things were apparently doing. So decided to take a chance on it and just had it in my head not to expect too much. It will be what it will be. I donít need crazy fast. Not what this was for. Just needed sensible and capable of the odd care free day out with the family.
    Well...this thing has literally astounded me at every aspect.
    Itís only a 115hp. Manages to push here along at 43 mph gps. Takes the big gear case and excellent line of props from mercury. Would easily put some ski boats to shame in pick up. Itís actually lighter in weight than the 125 hp optimax 2 stroke...out performed it in every way on a recent same boat test mercury did (and with less power ???).
    But most of all...the economy is nothing short of ridiculous. Seriously ridiculous. The smart craft technology it comes with too. Exceptional detail on all engine data and fuel management etc.
    Then there is the servicing. It is without doubt the cheapest and easiest services engine Iíve ever worked on. And there have been a few ! The engineering thatís gone into it is stunning. Even so far as the drip tray under the oil filter that drains away. The oil drain hose from the sump that quick connects. The cheap as chips spark plugs. Pennies and minutes to service. Must applaud mercury for changing the game here. Nothing short of excellent. And should also be commended for really taking the owner into account and allowing the service to be so ďhome service user friendly) not many OEM will encourage you to do your own.
    Donít have a second thought about them. If after 2016...these things are astonishing...but perhaps a little expensive, being critical. Lucky o didnít buy it when new !
    I read recently that the new mercury 400/450 comes in at about 45k. Extreme example but hey.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Home: Saffron Walden... boatless
    Posts
    2,430

    Default Re: Outboard v Inboard/sterndrive

    Um. That's interesting. I'm looking at a few OB boats (amongst literally almost everything else, I'm seriously undecided) at the show on Friday. The idea of cruising around sitting on a half a ton of petrol is, well, a bit of a worry, but the advantages the OP mentions do seem real.
    Graham. "Scala" now sold. Boatless.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,016

    Default Re: Outboard v Inboard/sterndrive

    Quote Originally Posted by Scala View Post
    Um. That's interesting. I'm looking at a few OB boats (amongst literally almost everything else, I'm seriously undecided) at the show on Friday. The idea of cruising around sitting on a half a ton of petrol is, well, a bit of a worry, but the advantages the OP mentions do seem real.
    I get your concern and agree Diesel has its advantage of being lazy to ignite. But it has many draw backs too. These new outboards are so ridiculously efficient and quite. Not to mention powerful...itís a serious thing to think about. Depending on the boat clearly.
    But they really are that good. Trust me. This is a big deal for me to admit this. I would be the last man to convert all my days. They are game changing these days.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Conwy
    Posts
    4,175

    Default Re: Outboard v Inboard/sterndrive

    The only think I have against outboards on a day boat is in most cases it makes carrying any sort of tender a bit of a pain and of course petrol availability. If neither is an issue for you then OB's make a lot of sense. imo.

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