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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    38,866

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by doug748 View Post
    I find it quite useful even pottering around the edges of Europe.

    I think the BBC are floating a similar illogical wheeze with Long Wave voice radio, viz

    1) It's really very old primitive technology

    2) It would be very difficult, if not impossible, to replace when it busts
    Basically it uses a lot of power and expensive equipment to get 'the archers' to a few dozen luddite expats in France. Who don't pay the licence fee and whine about the story lines anyway.
    Long wave transmitters are bespoke items, expensive but not exactly difficult technically.
    Nobody holds stock of monster valves any more, but solid state technology is available.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopefully somewhere warm
    Posts
    9,748

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by dunedin View Post
    Lots of people going transatlantic using devices like Garmin InReach - circa £300 and very compact. Satellite technology is advancing.
    Can they send gribs?
    Though gribs on their own are handy weatherfax really comes into it's own midocean - see the whole north atlantic synoptics & 500mB charts for free once you have a receiver.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    UK when not sailing
    Posts
    3,913

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    All very interesting. I had guessed that USCG was referring to INMARSAT which, as we all know is not suitable for most yachts. Nor would it be affordable for many small commercial vessels. This is a general problem, not just a leisure yacht one. I tried to get publicity for the problem of GMDSS generally in a Navigation News article in January 2005but had no response.

    To me, it seems the most likely outcome is based on the hope that satellite telephones become and services become more affordable. In parallel we would need GMDS information URLs to be reliable and unchanging so as to be reliably accessible. That is something that IMO/WMO could take steps to ensure. The ideal, probably unattainable, solution would be a dedicated GMDSS website that, somehow, would be free to access, continually updated and carrying all GMDSS information. Could telephone calls to such a site be free? The main drawback vis a vis the GMDS concept is that it would be a pull rather than a push system.

    Quo vadIs?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    The Northern Powerhouse
    Posts
    3,116

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    The alternative to Navtex is weatherfax or Inmarsat C, or data via a satellite phone or data link. I find weatherfax superior anyway and won’t miss Navtex. If near-shore you almost always can get mobile data too, or even the shipping forecast, so there should be access to all you need and cheaply if you want.

    It is going just in the US anyway and over there Navtex never caught on like it did in Europe. Different strokes, different folks.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
    Posts
    19,727

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by doug748 View Post
    I think the BBC are floating a similar illogical wheeze with Long Wave voice radio, viz

    1) It's really very old primitive technology

    2) It would be very difficult, if not impossible, to replace when it busts
    According to the Guardian in 2011, continued LW transmission depends on having a pair of transmitter valves of which there were then only ten left and which lasted between 1 and 10 years.
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    38,866

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    According to the Guardian in 2011, continued LW transmission depends on having a pair of transmitter valves of which there were then only ten left and which lasted between 1 and 10 years.
    Imagine! The Archers forced to go solid state!

    Still, in Scotland you have Burghhead and Westernglen transmitting the same (mostly) nonsense, no doubt McWebby will want that wavelength for independent Scotland when Droitwich wears out?

    These days there are many better ways of generating 198kHz, but why bother? It's very inefficient using 500kW to transmit very little bandwidth.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    We have a NavTex unit on our yacht, I know what it does but I have no idea how to make it provide the information I want, all of which for a coastal sailor is more easily found on the web. It no longer troubles me as I took the fuse out so it doesn't even draw any charge. One day I might attempt to work it out, but I think that could be a long way off.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    N Kent Coast
    Posts
    4,182

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    These days there are many better ways of generating 198kHz, but why bother?
    range + cheapness of receiving equipment.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    On land for now
    Posts
    2,825

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    ...
    These days there are many better ways of generating 198kHz, but why bother? It's very inefficient using 500kW to transmit very little bandwidth.
    So that SWMBO can listen to TMS running down the coast of Portugal !

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    UK when not sailing
    Posts
    3,913

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Clearly, from the posts above, many of us have our pet likes and dislikes of the various current channels by which we receive marine safety information. Salient facts are that:

    1. Analogue radio will cease in the not too distant future. So R4 LW will cease whether we like it or not.

    2. Teletext (RTTY/SITOR/NAVTEX) will cease in the not too distant future. So will Radiofax.

    3. Inmarsat is not suitable for many small craft both leisure and professional.

    So, questions that should be being addressed:


    What will replace these for GMDSS information?


    Who is representing the needs of these highly vulnerable groups at government and international marine Forums

    Do we have to accept that marine authorities will just assume that we will all reconcile ourselves to using the internet as our source of GMDSS?

    If so, how will they ensure that internet services are robust and reliable?

    Will they ensure that equipment and operating costs are affordable to all small craft owners?

    Failure to ensure the last two requirements will mean that they are abandoning the underlying principles and concepts of SOLA/GMDSS.
    Last edited by franksingleton; 30-09-19 at 13:27.

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