Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 62
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Oban
    Posts
    789

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by franksingleton View Post
    1. Analogue radio will cease in the not too distant future. So R4 LW will cease whether we like it or not.
    How will the trident subs know not to fire?

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    38,114

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by franksingleton View Post
    Clearly, from the posts above, many of us have our pet likes and dislikes of the various current channels by which we receive marine safety information. Salient facts are that:

    1. Analogue radio will cease in the not too distant future. So R4 LW will cease whether we like it or not.

    2. Teletext (RTTY/SITOR/NAVTEX) will cease in the not too distant future. So will Radiofax.

    3. Inmarsat is not suitable for many small craft both leisure and professional.

    So, questions that should be being addressed:


    What will replace these for GMDSS information?


    Who is representing the needs of these highly vulnerable groups at government and international marine Forums

    Do we have to accept that marine authorities will just assume that we will all reconcile ourselves to using the internet as our source of GMDSS?

    If so, how will they ensure that internet services are robust and reliable?

    Will they ensure that equipment and operating costs are affordable to all small craft owners?

    Failure to ensure the last two requirements will mean that they are abandoning the underlying principles and concepts of SOLA/GMDSS.
    The switch-off of analogue radio seems to be receding?
    The commercial fact is that FM stations make money and buy spectrum licences.

    Not that mainstream commercial broadcast has much to do with LW anyway.

    AIUI, weatherfax can be received from a statellite in the Atlantic, using a laptop and a cheap 'software defined radio'.
    Somewhere around 140MHz, between the air band and the 2m amateur band?

    Over the years, I've seen so much stuff debated and proposed, I've lost the plot as to what is actually happening.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    38,114

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pye_End View Post
    range + cheapness of receiving equipment.
    198kHz AM could be generated without the use of valves. The Irish LW station was nearly as powerful and had a brand new transmitter about 12 years ago. It's not some forgotten art that can't be replaced!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopefully somewhere warm
    Posts
    9,617

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    AIUI, weatherfax can be received from a statellite in the Atlantic, using a laptop and a cheap 'software defined radio'.
    Somewhere around 140MHz, between the air band and the 2m amateur band?
    Never heard of anything like that, guessing if it was real it would be fairly well known amongst cruisers as it would be really handy, rtl dongles don't go low enough for wfax broadxasts.
    Nothing on the rfax schedule doc either.
    any links?

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Lorient, just back from a second round Atlantic trip
    Posts
    3,563

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by GHA View Post
    Never heard of anything like that, guessing if it was real it would be fairly well known amongst cruisers as it would be really handy, rtl dongles don't go low enough for wfax broadxasts.
    Nothing on the rfax schedule doc either.
    any links?
    I think LW refers to Satellite weather imagery rather than weatherfax, a few NOAA orbiting satellites transmit around 137MHz, they can be received by SDR dongles, though it is a very different product with regards to weatherfax.
    oh no, yet another sailing blog
    http://sybrancaleone.blogspot.com/

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopefully somewhere warm
    Posts
    9,617

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roberto View Post
    I think LW refers to Satellite weather imagery rather than weatherfax, a few NOAA orbiting satellites transmit around 137MHz, they can be received by SDR dongles, though it is a very different product with regards to weatherfax.
    Ah yes, done that, noaa17 think it was. Manually adjust for the doppler as the satellite goes tick toc overhead.
    Fun and maybe a little useful but nothing compared the weatherfax synoptics. Should be possible to get wfax images from the Web with sail docs but would end up being a lod of data. Or even have some python running online to go grab them and compress in a page or 2. Would be very sad to lose wfax. Adds some fun to the day when it's time to turn on the radio and get today's latest.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    2,102

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ohlin Karcher View Post
    Navtex is free and authoritative, and very useful. I hope they don't get rid of it.
    I agree. Waking up to find a recent inshore waters forecast without relying on internet or VHF transmissions is thoroughly handy. There are still fair sized holes in GOOD internet coverage on the West of Scotland. Ireland we found considerably better.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oban
    Posts
    1,790

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    I would miss Navtex. I installed it some years ago, when the CG were playing silly buggers, and refusing to issue Safety Information.
    I sail on the West Coast and Hebrides. Some of the time I have Internet, some of the time I have the Inshore Forecast via VHF from the CG, some of the time I get Navtex. Usually, but not always, I can get at least one of the three. Obviously the most useful is the Internet, the CG don't do the forecast if they're busy, and Navtex is dodgy if close under high land, but has the great advantage that it records, and can be read later. So yes, I would definitely miss it.
    Me too. I'm not a particularly intrepid sailor, but my Western Isles sailing occasionally causes me to spend a couple of days in pockets of no phone or internet, and at that time I use Navtex as my source of weather info. It is by no means my main source, but it is sometimes my only source.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Itinerant. On an adventure!
    Posts
    2,856

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    Well, NAVTEX is like Marmite.

    But more useful. Get the kit set up and it does the necessary. That and the barometer.

    What did the NASA NAVTEX cost when it was launched? What does that translate to in today's value.

    Do need a some, reasonably priced system for receiving weather forecasts in a manageable format.
    Gwylan, a settee with a sail

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    UK when not sailing
    Posts
    3,871

    Default Re: NAVTEX - is its time up - at last?

    I agree with many of the comments above. I have had NAVTEX on our boat for many years and would not be without it although I do not see it with such rosy eyes as some. It is far from being totally reliable. Nighttime sky wave propagation is an intractable problem. In our Med days we had numerous occasions quite near to Toulon when we received Valentia, SW Ireland. also ID W, and, near Tarifa, receiving Cullercoats instead of Tarifa. Reception near the coast can be poor and in port. The specified requirement is for reception from the fairway buoy to about 200 mile out to sea. I have always advised that it should be carried as an integral part of the GMDSS.

    From my experience in recent years, I would hazard a guess that far more sailors rely on the internet than use NAVTEX, But, that is not the point that I was raising in the OP. Terrestrial marine radio has its problems and an uncertain future - the USCG notice shows that. The intenet has become a de facto source of GMDSS information. As such it should be robust and reliable. Although pretty good, it is currently neither. That seems not to be recognised by IMO/WMO.
    Last edited by franksingleton; 02-10-19 at 14:11. Reason: B****y self complete

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Latest YBW News

Find Boats For Sale

to
to