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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    9,759

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    Quote Originally Posted by Cardinal View Post
    That is an interesting way to put it!
    Certainly not lost and presumably worth lifting from its place of rest.
    Exactly. Ship’s anchors are valuable and are usually retrieved by a local diving company if not by the ship herself.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,771

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    I'm impressed the anchor was able to drop off, I'd have imagined it was secured by a hundred layers of paint by now...
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    location location ...
    Posts
    1,005

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    Red Funnel do seem to have more than their fair share of calamities ...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    West Sussex / Hants
    Posts
    28,771

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    Well fair's fair, they do actually trundle to and fro most of the time, unlike the Cowes chain ferry which may as well be sold off as a novelty riverside apartment !

    - Yes I know not the first, Uffa Fox lived in an old one for a while.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3,240

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    My guess.
    Routine standard operating procedure.
    When approaching a the dock the Anchor would be on stand by, or ready to release. windlass out of gear, compressor, securing Claws, chains, strops released or removed, the anchor on the brake,

    Ready to be dropped in an emergency, in the event of power or steering failure on approach.

    Some ferries. like my local ferry have a crew member standing by the anchor, some have a means of releasing the brake from the bridge. I don’t know what red funnel routine is.

    My guess the brake was inadvertently released. While vessel was still at significant speed.
    A little surprised they weren’t able to stop in time. Depends on the anchor system. All chain or chain and wire? How much cable? Before it came to the “bitter end”
    I wouldn’t want to be standing nearby.

    Must have had two to be able to sail 1 short.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,555

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    She returned to Southampton for inspection. Not clear she had self loading cargo though?

    Been out of service for the day for inspection

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,465

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    We were involved in finding an anchor lost by a Captain Cook vessel (the sort that take tourists round Sydney Harbour), quite large - it had accomodation, more like a small cruise ship, and was on its way for some modernisation.

    It lost its anchor (about 1t) when the 'joiner' (that has a technical name - that I forget) failed. They had 2 shackle lengths + anchor lying on the seabed. We found the anchor for them, which we buoyed, dropped a weight and buoy. All as Minn suggested - They called up a local dive school who secured a line (sufficient to lift enough chain to get to the capstan) - they retrieved the chain and anchor.

    What was bizarre - they had 2 anchors, 2 chains and a double windlass. The main chain, in the water, and the 'spare' chain (that they used to anchor the ship as they retrieved the lost portion) were a different size and the spare did not fit the windlass - yet it passed survey.

    Jonathan

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3,240

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    [QUOTE=Neeves;6932528]We were involved in finding an anchor lost by a Captain Cook vessel (the sort that take tourists round Sydney Harbour), quite large - it had accomodation, more like a small cruise ship, and was on its way for some modernisation.

    It lost its anchor (about 1t) when the 'joiner' (that has a technical name - that I forget) failed. They had 2 shackle lengths + anchor lying on the seabed. We found the anchor for them, which we buoyed, dropped a weight and buoy. All as Minn suggested - They called up a local dive school who secured a line (sufficient to lift enough chain to get to the capstan) - they retrieved the chain and anchor.

    What was bizarre - they had 2 anchors, 2 chains and a double windlass. The main chain, in the water, and the 'spare' chain (that they used to anchor the ship as they retrieved the lost portion) were a different size and the spare did not fit the windlass - yet it passed survey.

    Probably a “Kenter Joining Shackle”
    they are quite a clever puzzle piece.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,465

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    [QUOTE=Uricanejack;6932553]
    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post


    Probably a “Kenter Joining Shackle”
    they are quite a clever puzzle piece.
    The very word, 'Kenter'.

    And whilst on the subject - why is a chain length called a shackle when shackle has an entirely (or almost entirely) different meaning.

    Jonathan

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Cowes
    Posts
    596

    Default Re: Red Funnel loses anchor on approach to Cowes

    Quote Originally Posted by Uricanejack View Post
    My guess.
    Routine standard operating procedure.
    When approaching a the dock the Anchor would be on stand by, or ready to release. windlass out of gear, compressor, securing Claws, chains, strops released or removed, the anchor on the brake,

    Ready to be dropped in an emergency, in the event of power or steering failure on approach.

    Some ferries. like my local ferry have a crew member standing by the anchor, some have a means of releasing the brake from the bridge. I don’t know what red funnel routine is.

    My guess the brake was inadvertently released. While vessel was still at significant speed.
    A little surprised they weren’t able to stop in time. Depends on the anchor system. All chain or chain and wire? How much cable? Before it came to the “bitter end”
    I wouldn’t want to be standing nearby.

    Must have had two to be able to sail 1 short.
    A bit optimistic I think..Wightlink don't do any of that stuff, and they are a directly competing car-ferry operation, on a parallel route.
    "Now shall the gentleman haul and draw with the mariner"
    John Hawkins

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