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  1. #11
    stingo is offline Account Closed (By user's request)
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    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    It was also Uffa Fox that said something along the lines of a man's boat length should match his age. That's a lot of 70 to 80 foot boats just from this forum!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Cowes
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    596

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    This is all about passengers but what about crew?
    Wires and ropes maim and kill plenty, and all ships have them. Somebody got crushed to death on the Woolwich Ferry, a mooring line went in the rotating propellor. (One of the new ferries bears his name in memoriam).

    Someone got half their brain turned into jam by a shackle catapulted into his head, when a tow line parted. (I know him, and after months as a vegetable, the other half booted up and now he is alive and kicking although not working.)

    Deckie on a trawler is still right up near the top of the dangerous job charts.

    Ships offer almost unlimited potential for ruining your day, even tied to the wall!
    "Now shall the gentleman haul and draw with the mariner"
    John Hawkins

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    West Sussex / Hants
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    28,771

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    A chap was very badly hurt with ' life changing injuries ' on the old Cowes chain ferry while we were there but didn't see the accident happen - I believe yotties gave generously to the appeal, for what that's worth - it made me sick just to hear what had happened to the poor bloke, I'd chatted with him an hour before - I hope he has not been forgotten, I never learned his name.
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    S.W. France
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    7,673

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    As far as aircraft are concerned, the bigger the less chance of getting away with it. Notable exceptions, like on the Hudson, or down in shallow water.
    When we used to cross the Channel, we wore our LJs and kept the LR on the back seat, not in the bagage compartment. That was a low wing, even less chance in a high wing.

    Though I did like the bloke who ditched his little wooden single seater in the Channel, He sat on it until a ship came to help, and they even winched it on deck to take home. No LJ needed.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    SW Scotland
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    19,644

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stemar View Post
    Supplementary fact(?) from the same source: Lifejackets on airliners haven't saved a single life. ... Plausible, but are they true?
    The lifejackets-in-airliners claim is often made, but I am assured that it's not true. Here, for example, is the plane Captain Sullenburger landed on the Hudson River:



    When Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961 was hijacked, ran out of fuel and landed on water by the Comoros Island, at least some of the survivors probably owed their lives to lifejackets. Unfortunately a lot of the non-survivors owed their deaths to lifejackets as they inflated them early and couldn't get out of the cabin.

    Survivors ALM Flight 980 spent up to three hours in the water. As with Sully passengers, it can't be proved that the lifejackets saved any lives, but it seems likely.

    Of course that's not many, and it has been argued that if lifejackets were simply omitted the weight saving and higher climb rates possible would have saved more lives than lifejackets have. But then, can you see any airline not simply making up the weight with more passengers and cargo?
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,417

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldharry View Post
    I've heard it said that passengers who inflate their LJs inside the aircraft are far less likely to escape.
    .
    Billy Connolly always said that he would put his LJ on, wherever the plane crashed, because when they dug him up in 1000 years time, the future Tony Robinson would go on TV & tell people that this proved that there was a river there long ago. They would then start constructing computer pictures of harbours & boats & the viewing audience would all go " Aye, that is amazing!!!"
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    Continuing from my post # 10 here's ' The Flying Lifeboat ' ( you can see the origins of the Fairey Atalanta ) - I've asked a friend who used to fly Nimrods, he's finding out if Poseidons carry rafts to drop and will get back to us.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airborne_lifeboat
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    6,153

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldharry View Post
    I've heard it said that passengers who inflate their LJs inside the aircraft are far less likely to escape.

    As to lifeboats, its far safer if you can evacuate on to a floating platform of some kind. Serious fires on ships for example mean that most passengers can and have been safely evacuated. Skippers know that they will almost certainly have casualties and fatalities if they have to evacuate, and most of those will occur in the process of loading and launching the lifeboats.

    Perhaps aircraft should be fitted with lifeboats as well? If they can be free fall launched, which will hit the water first? The plane or the Lifeboat.... then there could be the catastrophic scenario of the passengers all escaping only to have the plane crash on them. Cant win I suppose.
    Every single safety briefing I've heard on an aircraft (and I've heard quite a lot) has emphasized that you DO NOT inflate your lifejacket until out of the aircraft. I am something of a connoisseur of safety briefings! The best I've seen so far is the Air New Zealand one, using Lord of the Rings imagery.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    The lifejackets-in-airliners claim is often made, but I am assured that it's not true. Here, for example, is the plane Captain Sullenburger landed on the Hudson River:



    When Ethiopian Airlines Flight 961 was hijacked, ran out of fuel and landed on water by the Comoros Island, at least some of the survivors probably owed their lives to lifejackets. Unfortunately a lot of the non-survivors owed their deaths to lifejackets as they inflated them early and couldn't get out of the cabin.

    Survivors ALM Flight 980 spent up to three hours in the water. As with Sully passengers, it can't be proved that the lifejackets saved any lives, but it seems likely.

    Of course that's not many, and it has been argued that if lifejackets were simply omitted the weight saving and higher climb rates possible would have saved more lives than lifejackets have. But then, can you see any airline not simply making up the weight with more passengers and cargo?
    Like so many businesses, ' this place would run so smoothly if it weren't for these godamn customers clogging up the works ! '
    Anderson 22 Owners Association - For info please ask here or PM me.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SW Scotland
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    19,644

    Default Re: The Most Dangerous Place on a Ship?

    Quote Originally Posted by Seajet View Post
    Like so many businesses, ' this place would run so smoothly if it weren't for these godamn customers clogging up the works ! '
    I believe the term is "Self-Loading Cargo".
    "Seamen are always wanting to do things the proper way; and I like to do them my way."

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