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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Rockall
    Posts
    31,555

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    How did you manage when yachts rarely had windlasses?

    What technique did you use that did not involve you touching the chain?
    That's a job for Roger the Cabin Boy.
    Well played plucky England

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3,273

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    No.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia.
    Posts
    5,598

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    We don't stop for lunch.

    When we anchor we use a bridle, always. We have a spare bridle, bridles, or one arm of - fail. if they are not failing (say every 2 years) then your bridle is not elastic enough.

    The bridle is there to provide elasticity. As a back up we have a 'chain lock', ours is a claw attached to a very short dyneema strop and the dyneema secured to a strong point (not the windlass).

    The clutch on the windlass is adjusted to allow the clutch to slip when we think it is overloaded - we do not alter that tension. If the anchor is so well set the clutch slips - we lock the chain with the short dyneema strop and claw (which we also use as back up for the anchor when at sea.

    None of this is rocket science, none of it costs any money (the bridle is recycled climbing rope).

    The bridle reduces veering (in the same way that anchoring in a 'V' reduces veering). It also absorbs the energy of the moving yacht - eliminating any snatch loads. Bridles would not be so effective on a smaller monohull - but might be advantageous on some with a bit of beam - and any that veer at anchor.

    Short snubbers offer minimum elesticity, they take the load off the windlass, stop the chain rattling - but not much more. Our bridle arms are now 30m each side - seems about right for us.

    Jonathan

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    6,993

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    We don't stop for lunch.

    When we anchor we use a bridle, always. We have a spare bridle, bridles, or one arm of - fail. if they are not failing (say every 2 years) then your bridle is not elastic enough.

    The bridle is there to provide elasticity. As a back up we have a 'chain lock', ours is a claw attached to a very short dyneema strop and the dyneema secured to a strong point (not the windlass).

    The clutch on the windlass is adjusted to allow the clutch to slip when we think it is overloaded - we do not alter that tension. If the anchor is so well set the clutch slips - we lock the chain with the short dyneema strop and claw (which we also use as back up for the anchor when at sea.

    None of this is rocket science, none of it costs any money (the bridle is recycled climbing rope).

    The bridle reduces veering (in the same way that anchoring in a 'V' reduces veering). It also absorbs the energy of the moving yacht - eliminating any snatch loads. Bridles would not be so effective on a smaller monohull - but might be advantageous on some with a bit of beam - and any that veer at anchor.

    Short snubbers offer minimum elesticity, they take the load off the windlass, stop the chain rattling - but not much more. Our bridle arms are now 30m each side - seems about right for us.

    Jonathan
    Interesting to see the differences. We do stop for lunch. We try to sail only between meals, so we may anchor several times each day. The idea of rigging snubbers every time is anathema. Obviously we do do longer trips to get to places, and we may stay in the same place for a few days. We use an all chain rode. Jonathan, with your 30m snubbers, you have effectively a mixed rode, which with your light displacement, and weight sensitive catamaran, makes sense.

    Interesting to read that you set your clutch so as to prevent overloading the windlass. How do you determine the correct setting for this? Ours is just a winged but, which is slackened off every time, to drop the anchor, and tightened up again once the desired length of chain is locked in the chain stopper, so that it is a backstop, and is also ready to heave in when required. I don't see how I could adjust it finely every time. Besides, I, or rather my wife, is perfectly capable of judging when to stop heaving, long before burning out the windlass.

    Regarding yawing, our yacht is a ketch, so probably yaws much less than a light catamaran, but if we find it a problem, we rig our double sided anchor/riding sail.

    We all have different ways of achieving the same result.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    12,370

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neeves View Post
    Our bridle arms are now 30m each side - seems about right for us.

    Jonathan
    Do you deploy all 30mtrs?
    What sort of depths are you anchoring in?
    I tend to anchor in about 5mtrs of water and put out at least 30mtrs of chain (measured at water level). My 10mtr snubber hooks on at around the 20mtr chain mark if I'm putting out 30 and is made off on a spring cleat giving me about 2mtrs of slack on the deployed chain.

    As said on the PBO thread, I wouldn't dream of putting the chain around the bow cleat, the clutch on the windlass is left tightened ready for lifting the anchor and the windlass chain (gipsy) lock is on. If conditions were very bad, I would consider putting on a line to secure the chain to the bow cleat, but I would be much more likely to be putting out more chain and extending the snubber.
    MontyMariner.co.uk
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  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Caribbean
    Posts
    2,434

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    Quote Originally Posted by NormanS View Post
    Interesting to see the differences. We do stop for lunch. We try to sail only between meals, so we may anchor several times each day. The idea of rigging snubbers every time is anathema. Obviously we do do longer trips to get to places, and we may stay in the same place for a few days. We use an all chain rode. Jonathan, with your 30m snubbers, you have effectively a mixed rode, which with your light displacement, and weight sensitive catamaran, makes sense.

    Interesting to read that you set your clutch so as to prevent overloading the windlass. How do you determine the correct setting for this? Ours is just a winged but, which is slackened off every time, to drop the anchor, and tightened up again once the desired length of chain is locked in the chain stopper, so that it is a backstop, and is also ready to heave in when required. I don't see how I could adjust it finely every time. Besides, I, or rather my wife, is perfectly capable of judging when to stop heaving, long before burning out the windlass.

    Regarding yawing, our yacht is a ketch, so probably yaws much less than a light catamaran, but if we find it a problem, we rig our double sided anchor/riding sail.

    We all have different ways of achieving the same result.
    We also sail a ketch but always use a snubber. Our ketch weighs 18/19 tonnes loaded. We never have an issue with load on the windlass as it only gets loaded when hauling up chain. It also has a 1700w motor and weighs 55kg. The snubber takes any load off the windlass at anchor. The snubber keeps things quiet at the bow. No chain noise. There are a few times when we have been in situations when we have been taking waves over the bow at anchor. The stretch in the snubber has to be seen to be believed as the bow goes up and down. In this situation I think the snubber helps to keep the anchor set rather than allowing the bow of the boat to snatch the anchor out as it rises to the waves.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    Am puzzled as to how do you get a sudden shock loading on the anchor chain such that a snubber can help.

    As the boat moves, first comes resistance from the weight of the chain is it’s lifted off the bottom, then comes resistance from straightening the catenary out, so you get a gradually increasing tension rather than a sudden snatch.

    That’s my analysis and experience anyway.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Greenwich
    Posts
    7,696

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    Quote Originally Posted by RogerJolly View Post
    Am puzzled as to how do you get a sudden shock loading on the anchor chain such that a snubber can help.

    As the boat moves, first comes resistance from the weight of the chain is it’s lifted off the bottom, then comes resistance from straightening the catenary out, so you get a gradually increasing tension rather than a sudden snatch.

    That’s my analysis and experience anyway.
    With any noticeable wind the catenary gets so close to a straight line that every extra cm takes a ludicrously high extra force so you are effectively anchored to an iron bar. And certainly on my boat which veers about, there is a jolt as the veer reverses. We use a snubber and I see it stretching clearly at each reverse.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Erith YAcht Club
    Posts
    487

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    how did the boat in the video get its heavy duty looking chainplate ripped out, i gather the keel was damaged by the "rescue" people towing the boat off the reef. Did they also rip out the chainplate as the tow line was on the mast? seemed like the boat would have been fine before it got towed
    Current boat: 1988 Jeanneau Sundream (lifting center board)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Portsmouth
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Do you use an anchor snubber?

    I also wondered why the chainplate ripped out. I could not see any tow line attached to the top of the mast. It looks like they were simply dragging the boat sideways towards deeper water by means of a bridle attached to both bow and stern and somewhere central on the boat. Probably this central line was attached to the bottom of a shroud, and, because of the geometry, taking the majority of the pull force.
    Perhaps it would have made more sense to lean the boat over by a line to the top of the mast. Perhaps not if the boat was already badly holed, leaning it wouldn't then have made any difference because whatever you do the boat is putting its full weight on the keel.
    If I was in that situation I think I would have at least tried to plug the hole and pump the boat out before trying to drag her off, but we don't know what was actually available.

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