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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    23

    Default Mooring rope length for locks

    Hi all

    I have a question regarding the ideal length of mooring ropes for the Thames locks. Reading the https://www.thamesvisitormoorings.co.uk website it mentions that some of the locks can be quite deep which made me wonder, how deep is deep! What sort of length ropes would you recommend?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    I would reckon on 25/30 ft for a bow and stern line. Should be long enough to throw in a bight and return on board.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Oxfordshire
    Posts
    1,815

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    Depends a little on how long your boat is and if you intend to send someone up to do the bowline or bring it back to the cockpit.

    My last boat was 23’ (7m), a 10m bowline was more than enough to be able to handle both ropes from the cockpit when single handing Sandford lock which is the deepest. If you single hand, it makes it a lot easier if you can keep hold of both ropes

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    Normally you are recommended to have a bow line that is shorter than your boat so you can't get it in your props and tie yourself up in a very tight knot! I stick with this rule and have a spare 15m line which I attach to the bow when making lock passages. To date this has covered all Thames lock adequately.
    CJL

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    Thanks for all replies.

    Had our first day on the Thames today. Marlow slipway to Henley town and back. Three locks encountered and the 10m length rope was perfect for all situations.

    Had the Thames to ourselves today, only two other boats out, was amazing.

    Can't wait for next year now but the time to winterise the boat has come.
    Last edited by SeaWeavers; 20-10-19 at 22:55.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    4,271

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    Quote Originally Posted by SeaWeavers View Post
    Thanks for all replies.

    Had our first day on the Thames today. Marlow slipway to Henley town and back. Three locks encountered and the 10m length rope was perfect for all situations.

    Had the Thames to ourselves today, only two other boats out, was amazing.

    Can't wait for next year now but the time to winterise the boat has come.
    Those three locks that you used are all relatively shallow. Marlow lock is a different story....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    136

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    I really don't like untidy numbers. It will of course vary by boat but in our case have always found 10 metres just not quite enough at just the rare but critical moment while 15 metres has always provided more slimy stuff to drag back onboard than was helpful. So it's 12.5 metres all the way for us. Conveniently 25M cut in half.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    351

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    I'm late to this, however, the EA recommends a minimum of 7 metres. That said, the appropriate length will depend on how far above the water line your mooring line is attached to your boat and how close the crew will be to the bollards along the edge of the chamber when they throw.

    Here's a link to lock information including fall at each chamber: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/river-th...-boaters#locks
    Last edited by Old Crusty; 22-10-19 at 06:39.
    When I was in the Navy ...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Medway
    Posts
    20,254

    Default Re: Mooring rope length for locks

    If you have the space and money and likely to encounter lots of locks, you could use some slightly lighter lines than those you would use for permanent mooring.
    This will help in throwing up lines to lockeepers and getting a turn round cleats and bollards etc.
    Especially those of us who have seen a few summers.
    Usually use a couple of light lines on both forward and aft and keep a short line midships, useful for hanging on in laybyes and other temp. stop situations when it is to much faffing to put out and tye off both head and stern lines.
    Last edited by oldgit; 22-10-19 at 07:29.

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