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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    377

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    Modern paints are far more durable than gelcoat - especially if you use base / clear. Formula paint all of their hulls in this way.

    A wrap is fine for a temporary change but don't think it will last more than a few seasons even if properly looked after. I'd be looking at Awlgrip if you want a permanent colour change.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bradford on Avon, Boat in Poole
    Posts
    173

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    We had our Sunseeker painted a few years ago after the old coating became dull and scratched. After looking around at all the wrap options we opted for AwlCraft2000 paint.

    4 years on and it still looks like new. It just needs a wash from time to time, no polishing like gel coat and no tears like wrap. Any ding’s and it’s a cheap repair.

    Would thoroughly recommend and as others have said I’d avoid wrapping.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Newark
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    I own a sign company and I wouldn't wrap my boat. The material as said is mainly for car/vans that will likely have the message/colour changed at the end of the lease or when ever a new design is required. The material is not robust enough for the marine environment. Thin stripes and logos + other decals can be the same/similar material as wrap film but they cover much smaller areas and aren't likely to get hit by ropes or rubbed by fenders and if they do you don't see the damage as much as a lrage area that wraps cover. When its damaged there is nothing for but to strip and replace the section. It can be patched but that can look really bad and as the owner you will know where to look and it will probaly bother you ever day until its properly sorted. I am not trying to talk down the industry I work in but I know its limitations and the material is best left to advertising on commercial vehicles that will be re wrapped when necessary

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    We manufacture self-adhesive vinyl waterline stripes, logos, names etc etc for the likes of Fairline.
    We also own a motor boat.
    I would not on any account apply a "wrap" to it.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Finchampstead, Wokingham, Berks
    Posts
    2,002

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    I know of a new boat this year that has had two goes at wrapping and on its winter lift will be looked at for a third time.
    Regal 2250 - see www.sportsboat.org.uk

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    I possibly should have said why No to a hull wrap.

    The main reason being the materials used are soft when compared to a correctly applied paint finish.

    They lack the ability to stand up to long term wear and tear caused by, such everyday things as fenders, or ropes chafing. Yes it can be repaired by applying a patch. But said patches tend to be more visible than a paint touch up.

    Self adhesive vinyl should be viewed as a practical option for details such as waterline stripes, names etc. But not for full hull, or deck wraps.

    Ok there are now specialist transparent materials to protect the paint on a car. But a car is not subject to the same chafes, rubs or scrapes as a boat hull. Although I have to admit I have applied small areas of this clear material to stop fender ropes scuffing the GRP. But these areas are small, and the material is viewed as being sacrificial, and replaced as required.

    Vinyl Wrapping first started in Germany, where all taxis were “cream”. Being able to buy a Merc in silver, have it wrapped in cream, and then remove the wrap when it came to be resold. Meant the resale value of the car in its now non taxi cream was enhanced.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    ation, Loc: ation, Loc: ation.
    Posts
    16,636

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    Malcolm, would the clear material be any good for protecting the blue rear quarters of my Targa from the elements (it's quite exposed)?
    Last edited by petem; 28-10-19 at 16:39.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Mid Sussex
    Posts
    62

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    Quote Originally Posted by petem View Post
    Malcolm, would the clear material be any good for protecting the blue rear quarters of my Targa from the elements (it's quote exposed)?
    Actually, this is the main reason (other than the colour change) that I want to do something with mine. Have a similar problem with the rear quarters and needing to wax them on almost every visit to the boat!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    Pete, Although I use it to protect specific areas against "scuffing" rather than weathering.
    I see no reason why it would not reduce weathering. I assume this is the usual blue gelcoat discolouring problem.
    send us a pm with a bit more detail as to the problem area.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Jersey/Antibes
    Posts
    22,688

    Default Re: Wrapping vs Painting

    Only just seen this. I agree 100% with jrudge in post #2 - wrapping a hull is a very poor alternative to proper paint. Fine for temporary advertising, but not for a permanent finish.
    I had a wrapped hard top and it just baked in the Med sun, and I spent a fortune having it removed. I also have silver painted parts on the same boat (painted in silver Awlcraft 2000, which is an awlgrip product), and they are fine even though exposed to much sun.

    Separately, the following needs correction:

    Quote Originally Posted by Portofino View Post
    If it’s any consolation Ferretti group paint all there boats as OEM theses days .
    Rivas , Pershings , Itama , even Ferretti beige and the rest .....
    Quote Originally Posted by Portofino View Post

    Everything you see is new and painted in the factory .
    The above is total nonsense. Ferretti cream boats in that picture are normal bare gelcoat, not painted. The Pershings are painted, whether silver or white, but those flybridge Ferrettis are not.

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