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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    82

    Question Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    As some of you may already know, I am in the process of a complete refurb of a Project 31 Motor Cruiser.
    I now have the replacement engines and several other parts obtained cheaply :-)
    The old cockpit has been pretty much emptied (apart from the 2x fuel tanks and 2x engines).
    I am now at the stage where i can start the rebuild of the cockpit / engine bay wooden frames and decking.
    I was considering using Redwood for the frames (mostly 4"x2", 3"x2" and some 1.5"x3/4") because of it's good resistance to rot and it takes preservers and paints well.
    I was also thinking of using 18-25mm Far Eastern WBP Ply with a hardwood veneer for a nice surface finish for the deck / seating wood.
    Since I know absolutely diddly-squat about wood, do you think this would be suitable. If not, what should I be looking at?
    Many thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    1,895

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveNotlob View Post
    As some of you may already know, I am in the process of a complete refurb of a Project 31 Motor Cruiser.
    I now have the replacement engines and several other parts obtained cheaply :-)
    The old cockpit has been pretty much emptied (apart from the 2x fuel tanks and 2x engines).
    I am now at the stage where i can start the rebuild of the cockpit / engine bay wooden frames and decking.
    I was considering using Redwood for the frames (mostly 4"x2", 3"x2" and some 1.5"x3/4") because of it's good resistance to rot and it takes preservers and paints well.
    I was also thinking of using 18-25mm Far Eastern WBP Ply with a hardwood veneer for a nice surface finish for the deck / seating wood.
    Since I know absolutely diddly-squat about wood, do you think this would be suitable. If not, what should I be looking at?
    Many thanks in advance.
    I was not aware that European Redwood was particularly durable (USA Redwood maybe different) but if you want a non-tropical timber at a good price I would certainly use it but only if, after assembling and fitting all the framework, it is given two coats of epoxy resin (following the manufacturer's instructions on overcoating and temperatures) to completely seal the wood. If you can find good quality BWP ply (good luck!) Then all cut edges should be sealed with at least 3 coats of epoxy resin and all faces with two coats. Then, as epoxy resin degrades in sunlight, all external surfaces should be painted or varnished with a good exterior varnish (that contains the UV filters).

    PS. Have just checked. European Redwood has a durability rating of 4 (1 is best and 5 is the lowest)

    Www.solocoastalsailing.co.uk
    Last edited by Plum; 04-11-19 at 16:44.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    Thanks Plum

    The sites I have come across (normal timber merchant and outdoor furniture manufacturers) say Redwood is better for taking fixings, better at anti-rot, etc than Whitewood.
    Not too sure of the difference though I believe whitewood is Spruce and similar and Redwood is mostly from Northerly grown Pine with denser rings due to slower growth....
    Regards, Stephen

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    An excellent company for reasonably priced hardwood is Feuillus Fencing Ltd, Google them and you will see they have an EBAY shop, with very reasonable postage.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    7,169

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    A big job and you don't want to waste all those hours of work and have to do it again.

    When I rebuilt my cockpit floor and hatches I used iroko and best quality marine ply from Robbins Timber Ltd, Bristol, a very reputable firm.
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Poignard View Post
    A big job and you don't want to waste all those hours of work and have to do it again.
    I understand where you are coming from but the boat is 50 years old and the original timber was a (very heavily) painted softwood that lasted all those years. If my rebuild job lasts 10 years I would be happy :-)
    Don't want to spend a small fortune on a boat I will probably only keep for a few years - I have this sick habit of rebuilding them, using for a few years and then selling on !!
    Cheers, Stephen

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    7,169

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveNotlob View Post
    I understand where you are coming from but the boat is 50 years old and the original timber was a (very heavily) painted softwood that lasted all those years. If my rebuild job lasts 10 years I would be happy :-)
    Don't want to spend a small fortune on a boat I will probably only keep for a few years - I have this sick habit of rebuilding them, using for a few years and then selling on !!
    Cheers, Stephen
    Fair enough.

    One last suggestion. If you are using softwood, protect it from rainwater with a good cover. Rainwater is a killer!
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Just off the Clyde just now. Looking to get back on.
    Posts
    736

    Default Re: Suitable wood for new cockpit frames and floor.

    Cedar or larch are very good softwoods for framing good resistance to the weather. Be careful of the plywood you use as some of the Chinese boards tend to de-laminate too easily. Ask your supplier for advice. Seal the end that is the surfaces not protected from the hardwood veneers with teak, teak has its own natural oils that protect the wood.

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