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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    37,224

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    Quote Originally Posted by Cathy* View Post
    It does take NMEA 2000 and the NASA one is compatible.
    Your original question mentioned a Nasa transducer at £107; at that price I think you're looking at a transducer which will only work with Nasa instruments.

    Nasa do something called the Tactical Wind Sensor for £175, this outputs NMEA0183 only.

    If you want an NMEA2000 transducer, you'll have to look at makes other than Nasa.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Boat in Plymouth
    Posts
    293

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Your original question mentioned a Nasa transducer at £107; at that price I think you're looking at a transducer which will only work with Nasa instruments.

    Nasa do something called the Tactical Wind Sensor for £175, this outputs NMEA0183 only.

    If you want an NMEA2000 transducer, you'll have to look at makes other than Nasa.
    We spoke to NASA and Garmin and both said they are compatible

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Boat in Plymouth
    Posts
    293

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    Quote Originally Posted by pvb View Post
    Your original question mentioned a Nasa transducer at £107; at that price I think you're looking at a transducer which will only work with Nasa instruments.

    Nasa do something called the Tactical Wind Sensor for £175, this outputs NMEA0183 only.

    If you want an NMEA2000 transducer, you'll have to look at makes other than Nasa.
    From NASA :-

    Nasa NMEA Masthead Unit

    Supplied with mounting brackets and with 20m of 2 core screened cable.

    Provides Wind speed and direction, and outside temperature in NMEA0183 format
    Can be used with the Nasa MeteoMan and any Chart Plotter or Autopilot system that accepts NMEA data

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39,137

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    In my view, if you're going to use wind direction info, you need 1 degree resolution.
    I can live without it, I race dinghies without it, but it is useful in terms of discussing whether we should point up a bit or bear off a bit, even when cruising or sailing with beginners.
    AIUI, old Nasa kit had poor resolution, even their current displays may not give a numerical readout?
    I want to be able to say 'steer about 30degrees on that dial' and get 29 to 31, not 25 to 35.
    The Nasa web page is not clear on this.
    A 2 degree luff is a lot when sailing a good boat close hauled.

    Obviously any indication has some use at night or if you can see a repeater at the chart table etc.

    Wind speed is most useful when sailing down wind, to avoid being surprised how windy it is when you head up.
    Or to know there is enough wind to fly the chute etc.
    A system which will calculate true wind is nice, if it's calibrated well and give the right answer, otherwise they are just an irritation to me.

    Likewise I am not keen on the Nasa speed logs which work in multiple of 0.1knot, saying 5.9 for the whole range of 5.85 to 5.95 and flipping to 6.0 doesn't tell you whether you've found 0.1knot or 0.01.
    Once you have sailed with more sensitive instruments you won't want to go back. Not just for racing, even with novice helms, it helps to see the speed dropping as they point too high. Or too low, sailing with a chute, improved sensitivity = less weaving all over the ocean!

    But the problem is, my taste gets expensive in this department....

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    37,224

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    Quote Originally Posted by lw395 View Post
    AIUI, old Nasa kit had poor resolution, even their current displays may not give a numerical readout?
    I want to be able to say 'steer about 30degrees on that dial' and get 29 to 31, not 25 to 35.
    The Nasa web page is not clear on this.
    A 2 degree luff is a lot when sailing a good boat close hauled.
    Nasa wind transducers seem to have a 6 degree resolution.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Home East Lancashire boat Spain
    Posts
    4,745

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    We have a dog house and its a real pain ( in the neck) to see a windex.
    Our NASA has been working for 7 years now ( 5 in the Med.) without any problems.
    We also use wool streamers lower down.
    It works for us!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    9,011

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    I've had Raymarine and NASA wind instruments and had technical issues with the former and non with the latter although the Raymarine I had for six years and the NASA for one. I've always had stand alone instruments - interfaced are too complicated (for me) and I don't 'get' the advantages. The most reliable wind indicator, by far, is woolies at head height on the shrouds. I find a Windex difficult to see due to a stiff neck.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Oxford & WicorMarine
    Posts
    228

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    Quote Originally Posted by JumbleDuck View Post
    Same here, sort of. I probably wouldn't fit from new, but I quite like having them for sailing at night. Saves constantly looking up to see what the Windex is doing.
    Osprey came with a supposedly functioning ST50 that in fact proved to be not. The diagnostic process was not helped by the fact, discovered much later, that the boatyard that replaced the mast head unit just after acceptance bunged it in skew, so the in the plug, two pins were broken and the rest bent. I only found this after a long time chasing wiring faults and the possibility that the gauge head was faulty, so by then, having sourced a new plug for not much money and soldered it in place myself, couldn't be arsed to go back to them for redress. I will not bore you with the rest of what has proven to be a slow-running four-year saga. Thanks in the end to (1) a friend who is an electronics whiz, who amongst other things builds cave radio-communication devices (hobby) and real-time diagnostic devices for fusion reactors (job) , and (2) finding in these forums a source for the full circuit diagram of the instrument; it got fixed. One of the I/O chips had got fried (maybe as a result of the MHU pins cock up? Who knows?), and my friend worked this out, managed to unsolder it (12 pins) from the crowded circuit board and fit a new one. As as of two weeks ago when I finally (I hope) put the MHU back, it seems to be working as it should.

    Anyway... like JD, had there not been one fitted already, I wouldn't have gone to the trouble of fitting one. but given there was one on board, it became the "Fil Rouge" of the boat to get it to work. It just took a lot longer and involved more up-and-down the mast trips than I could have imagined to start with. Joker played, i think!

    Steve

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39,137

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    Five quid gets me an Infineon angle sensor with 0.01degree resolution.
    https://www.digikey.co.uk/product-de...ource=octopart
    Repeat after me:
    I DON'T NEED ANOTHER PROJECT!
    I DON'T NEED ANOTHER PROJECT!
    ....

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    3,751

    Default Re: Choosing an anemometer

    I've not had a wind instrument on any of my boats and not really missed them at all. Very nice if your boat comes with one but I would not fit one on my current boat - better projects will get my dosh. I do have a masthead windex and one at the stern on a pole.

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