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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    28

    Wink New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Hi everyone! I've just bought a boat, and I'm very excited. It needs some jobs doing and I have plans . Sadly due to life not blessing me with unlimited riches, I can't do everything I would want, but fortunately, she isn't a project, she's been well looked after and left unused for a few years, but is in good condition considering - especially compared to some of the wrecks I went to see for the same price.

    So here's what I know - she's an Anderson 22, (and yes I have been in touch with Seajet), she's either been freshly painted and antifouled, or hasn't been in the water since they were done. Her sails are old, and her standing rigging appears in good shape. Her running rigging has started to grow all sorts of interesting plantlife however.

    Her forward hatch appears to let more water in than falls from the sky and her bilges under the v-berth have quite the interesting lake developing inside. These bilges do not appear to connect to the main, so I'm home from having discovered it, drinking up the milk so I can cut the bottle in half to bail them out tomorrow. The main bilges had a decent amount of water in them, they were dry last week, but the bilge pump reduced the level down to a cm or so before pumping air. I put a tarpaulin over her today to try to keep any more water from getting in.

    The battery is dead, the state of the rest of the electronics is unknown, assumed dead by the amount of water I emptied from each componant. I got one light to switch on above the chart table, but it was really dim and red. It may be a night vision light as there is a paraffin lamp just next to it, but I'm assuming not - it really is so dim that I'm assuming it's malfunctioned.

    There is a really nice wood flooring inside, but it's just beginning to lift inside the companionway.

    She has a lifting keel, the winch is rusty but seems sound enough, however the steel line is doing it's very best to turn into barbed wire, loose strands sticking out everywhere.

    The state of the sails is unknown, as is the state of the outboard, though the guy who sold it to me is completely trustworthy and said they were alright. The tender made my car smell like baby vomit, I'll probably not even open it's bag! There are two electronic things embedded in the hull, I'm assuming one is a depth sounder. Sadly they are both embedded in the v-berth lake, so condition, unknown, assumed not working.

    Right, so, what are my plans (in no particular order):

    LiFePo Battery, solar panel to complement the existing rutland 504 (Spins well enough, can't say if it's working though) and a gigantic control panel, so in the future I can add a matched battery and a second solar panel and still not stretch it. Why this much power? I plan on taking my son away for the weekend and letting him recharge his switch and keep my laptop running. I need a new GPS as I doubt the one with the boat will turn on after it's been dried, it also had batteries leak into it's insides. I need new lights inside. The handheld radio appears to work, and the big radio doesn't seem to have been affected too badly by the moisture, but I haven't had it turned on yet. Nav lights are unknown, the mast is down but I have no idea how to test them!

    Inflatable kayak for a tender from decathlon.

    The most important job for me is getting that lifting keel wire replaced and the winch serviced. I also want to put an anode on the keel, there is pitting all across it which looks like electrical wear to me, and I know Seajet found that it helped his wear - I'll be sailing in the same waters.

    I'm going to soak in water and gently scrub the lichens and moss from the running rigging, and replace any rope that seems even slightly compromised.

    I would quite like to have a sculling rowlock fitted on the back, I'm determined to use the outboard as little as possible, but I will keep it in good repair as it will be on board as an emergency measure. (I'm, for a distant future plan, sizing up the outboard well as a possible site for a wind vane). However, I don't want to do anything irreversible to the boat (or irreversible for my skill level in repairing GRP - none) so something mounted on the guard rails rather than something mounted on the hull is what I'm thinking.

    I do need to get the sails out and examine them, when the ground dries enough, but I do trust the person I bought the boat from.

    Right, my budget then is £2000. How far do you think that will get me? What would you prioritise, what would you push back for another year? Have I missed anything? Happy to provide photos, I'm able to go to the boat most days.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Home East Lancashire boat Spain
    Posts
    4,742

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    The main initial spend will be 'time and effort' ! Yes sort out a battery and possibly solar power so you have light while you are slaving away at night.
    get her properly dry inside and ensure that she will remain dry; where has all the recent water come from. be brave get that skanky tender out of the bag, a good clean may reveal a gem ( like an avon redshank/start.
    A budget of £2000 could be all you need but start with the basics first.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    37,176

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Welcome to the forums!

    In view of your budget, I'd buy ordinary lead-acid batteries. LiFePO4 batteries are still silly money, and need a specific charging regime.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Home - Sothampton, Boat - Gosport
    Posts
    10,660

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Lithium batteries are great, but still expensive. On your budget, I'd go for a lead acid job to get you going.

    By all means plan on using your engine as little as possible, but the currents on Chi Harbour are fierce. Make sure that engine is working reliably!

    + 1 on getting the tender out and blown up. I'd leave it out in the rain, inflated, for a couple of weeks to get rid of the smell and wash off the crud, then check for problems like cracking of the "rubber". If it stays up, and there's no obvious damage, it's a good 'un. Do tie it down, though, or it'll be two streets downwind after the next deppression comes through!

    Budget for changing the standing rigging. If it's of unknown age, it could fail without warning. If changing it is really out of the question, check it carefully, especially where the wire goes into the solid metal. Some insurance companies get twitchy about anything over about 15 years old, but ...

    On the subject of insurance, you'll need it to get a mooring. I wouldn't bother with more than 3rd party, or you'll be paying a significant proportion of the value of the boat each year.

    Take all the bits of string down to a launderette and give 'em a wash - bung in a good bit of fabric softener. You may find it'll all come up like new, or at least usable. Any bits that don't survive were knackered anyway. You could use your own washing machine but, if 'er indoors finds out you could be walking with a limp for a while.

    If you find you need to know about working with GRP, this is a useful reference: https://www.westsystem.com/instruction-2/

    One final thought, if she's as grubby as she sounds, a jet washer could be very useful, but don't blast the gelcoat from close up; I've blown bits of jelcoat out doing that.
    Steve
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    East Sussex.
    Posts
    21,518

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Welcome. You will soon find quite enough to spend money on, and the trick is to do the essential things first and not be tempted to add nice things until you have a basic but safe boat. As you said the first job after stopping water ingress is clearly that lifting keel mechanism. Having the mast down is actually a big opportunity because you can inspect everything close up without having to climb. Get someone knowledgeable to inspect all of the standing rigging terminals and wire to decide whether the rig really is serviceable. Now is also the time to see if the masthead navigation light works, as its much easier to replace now. If you are not planning to have an electronic wind instrument, do buy and fit a Windex, again much easier with the mast down.
    Good Luck.
    Working on immortality - One day at a time.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Don't worry, I'm willing and planning on putting in time and effort! I can only be there for a few hours a day thanks to work and other responsibilities, but I can and am planning to be there nearly every day! The water I'm certain all came in through the front hatch - as I said, it was pouring in during the recent rainfall. Today's job is to remove it and clean up the edge, and figure out whether reseating it will solve the problem or if the hatch itself leaks... a job that I suspect will continue tomorrow too! You are correct on the tender though, I will get it out... I'll bring along a clothes peg!

    On lead acid and Lithium, I prefer Lithium for the weight, and I can get a 24v 55ah battery for £450 (24v is cheaper even after the 12v conversion for the amount saved in cable thickness), while lead acid to the same specification would cost £300, and am I correct in thinking I would need two of them as you shouldn't discharge them below 12.2v making them both heavier and more expensive? If this is one of _those_ topics, chalk me up on the lithium side, I'm not wanting to get derailed, especially when the electronics is candidate number 1 to be pushed to another year!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Oooh, I'm being pre-moderated and can't edit in the following, so sorry for the double reply, but while I was writing the last one, a few posts appeared!!

    That's a really good point about the currents in Chichester - 6knots at the entrance I'm told! I have promised my wife that I won't leave the harbour for at least the first year unless on a sailing club event, otherwise the "motorbike veto" would have been imposed However, that means all my sailing will be "with the tide" - limiting I'm sure, but I'm just learning and Chichester harbour has plenty to explore - when I say learning, I've been sailing dinghys for decades, but this is my first big boat (big to me , compared to a Wayfarer at least! )

    My insurance is already sorted, and paid for the year, it doesn't have to be accounted for. I'm hoping for a club mooring, but if I have to go on a waiting list, I've got a Conservancy mooring lined up (also already got money set aside for, doesn't have to come from the £2000)

    Does anyone know what sort of money - worst case scenario - I would pay to have someone come out, inspect the standing rigging and replace it - including the keel wire? Or on my budget is this out of my reach? Also, what would a windex or electronic wind instrument do, are we talking a wind direction indicator, because I have one, but I tend to just look at the water in dinghys as it's a bit more accurate.

    She's actually not all that grubby, she's been well looked after and while she could use a good scrub I don't think there's a need for a jet wash - bucket and brush will do the job just fine!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    UK East Coast
    Posts
    37,176

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyWill View Post
    On lead acid and Lithium, I prefer Lithium for the weight, and I can get a 24v 55ah battery for £450 (24v is cheaper even after the 12v conversion for the amount saved in cable thickness), while lead acid to the same specification would cost £300, and am I correct in thinking I would need two of them as you shouldn't discharge them below 12.2v making them both heavier and more expensive? If this is one of _those_ topics, chalk me up on the lithium side, I'm not wanting to get derailed, especially when the electronics is candidate number 1 to be pushed to another year!
    You can get a decent 12v 110Ah "leisure" battery for £66; if you were to get 2 that'd be £132.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    28

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    That is quite a saving! Lead acid is back on the table! I'm assuming, given the price difference that the leisure batteries can't provide high amps, which I wouldn't need but something like a wheelchair would?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cascais, Portugal
    Posts
    1,001

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Presumably everything is 12v at the moment, so a 24v alternator would have to be added to the mix and voltage convertors (24v to 12v) if the existing electronics are going to be used. On a boat that size I wouldn't think there would be much of a saving in the cost of wire either......

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