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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    6,709

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    I certainly wouldn't bother with a survey after you bought the boat as they are expensive and probably wont tell you anything you don't know by now. Much like expensive batteries best to save the money until you identify essential items you do need. Just get it seaworthy and enjoy sailing it.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    337

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    A cockpit mounted chart-plotter is incredibly useful. No matter how much shit is hitting the fan you will know where you are.

    You will also know where you absolutely should not be. If you set it up right you will also have an easy to follow track to safety.

    The do not draw much power at all, are cheap, waterproof, reliable & can be read equally well in bright sunlight or at night.

    Yes - you can probably save a couple of quid by navigating with a phone or tablet, but a dedicated plotter is right there in front of you when you need it most.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Sail on the Medway, Kent from Chatham Maritime Marina
    Posts
    1,972

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by obmij View Post
    A cockpit mounted chart-plotter is incredibly useful. No matter how much shit is hitting the fan you will know where you are.

    You will also know where you absolutely should not be. If you set it up right you will also have an easy to follow track to safety.

    The do not draw much power at all, are cheap, waterproof, reliable & can be read equally well in bright sunlight or at night.

    Yes - you can probably save a couple of quid by navigating with a phone or tablet, but a dedicated plotter is right there in front of you when you need it most.
    Useful but not essential. Being an East Coast Sailor, you have to be very aware of how much water you have under the keel and I assume that would be the same in Chichester Harbour. Most channels are fairly well marked in shallow water, so a cockpit chart plotter is not needed, just a good chart.

    In the distant past I used to race a 22ft drop keel yacht (fixed down when sailing) for day sailing. It had no battery, no nav lights, no log or echo sounder, no VHF. All it needed was a compass and a Windex. The outboard lived virtually all its life in the locker as the boat was able to sail fast and only used when there was no wind. I doubt if the OP's outboard would make 6 knots anyway to come in Chichester Harbour against the tide. It did have a single burner hob and an Elsan toilet, but in 4 years neither was used. So OP, keep to the very basics initially and see what you need, not buy everything and waste lots of money. Follow the KISS principal. You have been used to dinghy sailing in a 16ft Wayfarer, so what difference will there be by adding 6 ft if you are day sailing?
    If my foresight was as good as my hindsight, I would be a multi-millionaire.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyWill View Post
    Hi everyone! I've just bought a boat, and I'm very excited. So here's what I know - she's an Anderson 22
    Good choice for a solid, seaworthy and enjoyable boat to sail.

    Enjoy your sailing!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyWill View Post
    On lead acid and Lithium, I prefer Lithium for the weight, and I can get a 24v 55ah battery for £450 (24v is cheaper even after the 12v conversion for the amount saved in cable thickness), while lead acid to the same specification would cost £300, and am I correct in thinking I would need two of them as you shouldn't discharge them below 12.2v making them both heavier and more expensive? If this is one of _those_ topics, chalk me up on the lithium side, I'm not wanting to get derailed, especially when the electronics is candidate number 1 to be pushed to another year!
    An 85Ah lead acid leisure battery should cost you around GBP 70.00, but leave it to another year as you will have plenty of essentials to spend your cash on.

    Get the boat waterproof top/bottom first. There is a chandler in Fareham that sells the rubber seal for Houdini hatches. They might be your first stop.

    Standing rigging. If it isn't new, renew it. Ocean chandlery on Thorney island is your first stop for a quote. (Seajet's friend John got his rigging replaced there and was very pleased at price and quality).

    Cleanup (pressure washer!) and ensure the stainless forestay structure at the bow has been fixed. Speak to Seajet on this one.

    Fix or replace anything to do with safety and sailability before thinking about electrics, cooking or soft furnishing. Also, make sure your sails are serviceable including the genoa roller reefing. Does the rudder lift, lower and work correctly without excessive play? Fix it.

    Keel. I'd throw the wire and use dyneema (did this on my E-Boat when the dyneema lasted 4x the life of the wire, and have tried both stainless and galvanised wires, both 'nasty' at the end of the season).
    Last edited by langstonelayabout; 16-11-19 at 07:58.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by NickRobinson View Post
    ""My insurance is already sorted, and paid for the year, ""

    With or without a survey? I've been looking at fix-up boats since Sept and found no one will quote for Comp Ins without a recent (or new) survey. Third party a different matter. PM me if you'd prefer or I'll watch here-
    Fair Winds (code for 'we must be mad buying boats in winter'...)
    N
    My (few years ago) experience with N&G taught me that they will insure boats of 24' or less fully comp as 'small craft' without survey, but the onus will be on you to prove your boat was seaworthy in the case of a claim.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
    Posts
    1,375

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyWill View Post
    I'll check the anchor chains!!
    Assuming that you will be mooring/sailing at LSC, checking the mooring chains will be one of your first jobs, as everyone will be on work parties checking the moorings prior to the start of the season.

    Muddy? Yes. Good education as to what a mooring is/does and feels like? Definitely, and priceless. To add to your education on moorings, ask someone to see the club's specification/drawing on swinging moorings as it's well worth a look and you can understand what's buried in the mud better once you've seen it.

    And anchor chains? reasonable anchor, about 10-20m of 8mm chain and the rest 12mm rope will be an ideal rode. At risk of starting an anchor discussion, I tend to use a Delta or Bruce out of choice but CQRs and Danforths seem to work well in the mud locally.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Solent, UK
    Posts
    4,650

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by SleepyWill View Post
    That is quite a saving! Lead acid is back on the table! I'm assuming, given the price difference that the leisure batteries can't provide high amps, which I wouldn't need but something like a wheelchair would?
    Furneaux Riddle in Portsmouth are worth a visit regarding simple boat electrics. I buy my batteries and boat lights there these days. Your "red" internal lamp sounds like a night vision lamp. Domestic lights are usually white. Go for leds.

    Lidl and Aldi frequently sell multiplait ropes (8 & 10 mm) and they''l do fine for running rigging and even warps in the short term. You'll need something bigger for a swinging mooring but most chandlers have bargain buckets of "ends" I don't know where you're based but Ocean Chandlers in Emsworth (previously Sea Teach) are my go-to in Chi Harbour. They do a good range of budget sails too.
    Grow old disgracefully, it's more fun

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Home: North West, Boat: The Clyde
    Posts
    3,771

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    You’ve just bought a boat and it’s November! That proves your credentials, utterly mad, well done and welcome

    I have nothing to add only encouragement.

    After a few dinghies my first sea boat had a lifting keel and it failed, fortunately in Port Dinorwic outer harbour, where it was recovered and repaired. You need to get yours sorted such that you have confidence in the mechanism.

    The insurer asked me to provide an owner’s survey. This was quite an instructive process. It drove me to inspect every aspect of the boat in a structured way.

    I strongly agree with others, your priorities should be mechanical. Basic electrics for nav lights should suffice if funds are tight. Tide tables, charts and a pilot book are needed for navigation. Creature comforts, especially if you’re trying to win-over family, should be a higher priority than electronics. Learn how to use the compass and log.

    Have fun, be safe, fair winds

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    London / Suffolk
    Posts
    870

    Default Re: New (to me) sailboat, new to the hobby, help me spend my savings!

    Quote Originally Posted by Concerto View Post
    Useful but not essential. Being an East Coast Sailor, you have to be very aware of how much water you have under the keel and I assume that would be the same in Chichester Harbour. Most channels are fairly well marked in shallow water, so a cockpit chart plotter is not needed, just a good chart.

    In the distant past I used to race a 22ft drop keel yacht (fixed down when sailing) for day sailing. It had no battery, no nav lights, no log or echo sounder, no VHF. All it needed was a compass and a Windex. The outboard lived virtually all its life in the locker as the boat was able to sail fast and only used when there was no wind. I doubt if the OP's outboard would make 6 knots anyway to come in Chichester Harbour against the tide. It did have a single burner hob and an Elsan toilet, but in 4 years neither was used. So OP, keep to the very basics initially and see what you need, not buy everything and waste lots of money. Follow the KISS principal. You have been used to dinghy sailing in a 16ft Wayfarer, so what difference will there be by adding 6 ft if you are day sailing?
    Wot he said
    Someone more informed will come along any minute

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