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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Falmouth
    Posts
    399

    Default Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Heard on the news this morning.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-50462114

    My wife tells me they spoke of one of the "Clipper" yachts which had been refurbished and was on a delivery trip to Ireland.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,594

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Slightly more info:

    http://hmcoastguard.blogspot.com/201...g-sailing.html

    No mention of clipper... But no mention of not

    Good decision to get off, although why they couldn't stem the flow of water...?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    388

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Did I read it right? The bilge pump didn't work due to an ingress of water?

    Of course pleased that all are safe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    1,594

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Well I read it more as...

    There was an ingress of watery stuff

    The water shorted the lectrics

    The bilge pump doesn't work if the lectrics are dead

    If it's a clipper it's hard to imagine it has no redundancy! And some of the usual tricks in such situations such as raw water inlet from engine along with putting a bung in the hole could surely have held back water enough to prevent a short...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3,288

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    An ex clipper would presumably be code 0 capable. Which would imply not so much redundancy as reserve buoyancy internal subdivision.
    Pump failure would be normal without internal subdivision. As for redundancy most yachts have little or none.
    Mine has the usual electric, manual and final bucket. No subdivision.
    What code 0 actually requires I have no clue. I have never had a reason to read the requirements.

    Hence my personal response. Vessel taking on water. I reply to CG and respond without hesitation. Without salvage pumps, can’t really do much but pick up the crew.
    The points. I note here, they used the life raft, the vessel sank, they were picked up from the raft.

    Sailing mid November western approaches even close to shore. Not having a life raft could have been a tragic out come.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Med
    Posts
    6,271

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Quote Originally Posted by ShinyShoe View Post
    Well I read it more as...

    There was an ingress of watery stuff

    The water shorted the lectrics

    The bilge pump doesn't work if the lectrics are dead

    If it's a clipper it's hard to imagine it has no redundancy! And some of the usual tricks in such situations such as raw water inlet from engine along with putting a bung in the hole could surely have held back water enough to prevent a short...
    It's so easy for them sitting by a cosy fire saying they could had done this or that,
    Tons of time to think of what they can do then post here, but when you step down a company way in the middle of the night and find the floors afloat now that a very different story.
    To find a leak in a 40 foot boat when part of the hull has filled is hard enough let alone in a 70 ft boat .
    If the power was out then they wouldn't been able to start the engine so the raw water suggesting goes out the window.
    There come a point for us who have been in this type of situation when we have to decide what more important,
    Trying the Impossible saving the boat or the life on tho on board.
    These guys did just the right thing , as we read the boats sink not long after they left the boat.
    These clippers guys would had lots of training and probably wil be more prepared what to do in these situation then Most weekend sailors so let not start running them down.
    Well done guys of doing what was needed to live another day.
    Last edited by sailaboutvic; 19-11-19 at 05:27.
    Warning forumite dyslexia near by
    www.bluewatersailorcroatia.webs.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Kernow
    Posts
    4,178

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Oh gosh, let's hope this doesn't become yet another "ckipper evil", "RKJ evil" thread.

    Any idea what the boat was?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Isle of Lewis
    Posts
    539

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    The link from the MCA fb page makes it sounds like a catastrophic ingress of water causing failure of all electrics. Sounds like a really big hole

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Mooring, Faro
    Posts
    1,976

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    Finding a leak once it's well submerged is extremely difficult. From personal experience, I can say it really made my bum twitch when I found water over the sole boards on delivery trip with new to us boat, just off the Skerries. Water had covered all the underwater hull fittings so difficult to find the problem. Eventually found it was the gas locker drain on the transom which submerged with stern squat when motoring and the plywood gas locker bottom was well rotten. Luckily I spotted it by chance when opening the cockpit locker to get a bucket. Managed to hang over the stern and stick a cork in the outlet which stopped the ingress but it took a hell of a long time to pump the water out with just hand pump. First jobs when we arrived were to make a new gas locker and fit an electric pump and float switch.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    10,431

    Default Re: Crew winched to safety after 70-ft yacht sinks

    I have a boat that was coded ‘0’, and she came with watertight bulkheads, a stability book* and three bilge pumps, one Whale 25 on the deep bilge only and a Henderson and a big electric pump which go to a manifold with valves to each compartment. It would certainly be possible to sink her, but if you do as we do and close the bulkheads and hatches at sea, which is the work of a moment and not inconvenient, she would have to be damaged on a bulkhead or have a door fail.

    * Favourite chapter: Departure Condition: Main Saloon Flooded Yes, I know what it means, but I must have a childish sense of humour as it still makes me giggle.
    Last edited by Kukri; 19-11-19 at 11:05.

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