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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Southminster, essex
    Posts
    9,621

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    In the picture of that boat with the spinnaker the boom is being held by the windward mainsheet. The leeward one is slack. That suggests that he is not using that one to assist the vang. So in that situation, one might ask what is the point of the arrangement?
    Last edited by Daydream believer; 27-11-19 at 13:39.
    It is all down to the fact that my wife does not understand me !!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39,131

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream believer View Post
    In the picture of that boat with the spinnaker the boom is being held by the windward mainsheet. The leeward one is slack. That suggests that he is not using that one to assist the vang. So in that situation, one might ask what is the point of the arrangement?
    The point is sheeting from a more windward point in the cockpit without a traveller. Also being able to use the leeward sheet to apply plenty of leach tension when required, which generally isn't with the kite up.
    It doesn't fully replace the vang (apart from close hauled), any more than a short traveller does.
    It looks like a lot of heavy string and blocks to me, but I appreciate that travellers are expensive (so are blocks) and not always reliable.

    I'd guess it works better or less well depending on exactly where the boom needs to be, which will depend on lots of things including how much genoa overlap you have.

    It might be handy for a storm trysail too? If the sheeting points in the cockpit were in the right place...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39,131

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Quote Originally Posted by Kukri View Post
    For deep sea use, it seems much better, because you can stop the boom from moving.

    Inshore, not so much.
    I lash something together on the mooring which works in a very similar way, to keep the boom still.
    I think more gooseneck wear happens on the mooring than when sailing.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    83

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Quote Originally Posted by LadyInBed View Post
    Not if it's a continuous sheet, so no bitter ends.
    I'm thinking of doing it on my main which is on a traveler on the coach roof. I have made the traveler sheets continuous which works well. I would like to remove the traveler block and anchor two main sheets at the ends of the traveler track. The only thing that's stopping me is the cost of the extra blocks.
    Do you have a drawing/photo of your traveler setup? Sounds interesting.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    N of Ardnamurchan, winter Loch Melfort
    Posts
    957

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Matmut is a Rustler 36 (I have a R36) which has the mainsheet traveller across the cockpit:

    R36mainsheet_s.JPG

    I guess for ocean sailing it makes sense to do away with this, and sheet from either side. It's not as if there are going to be frequent adjustments or tacking.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    2,790

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    The owner/skipper of MalMut, the R36 in the OP, is Jean-Luc van den Heede. He's certainly one of the most experienced long-distance skippers around.

    https://goldengloberace.com/skipper/...-den-heede-13/

    His preparations for the GGR were detailed and meticulous - contrasted with that of some others - and he has evidently exercised his judgement on fitting a double mainsheet tackle as shown. He suffered a severe knockdown, his much-reinforced mast was damaged at the lowers' attachment point - but survived - and he nursed the rig all the way back from SW of Chile to stay ahead and win the race. Both he and Tony Curphey have such a setup. I'd like to understand their rationale.....

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    33,644

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    I went for this arrangement on Snow Leopard. One key factor was that with the solid boom arrangement there was no need for a downward pull to flatten the sail so it only needed enough power to rotate the boom. By setting the sheeting points well apart so they were always pulling sideways instead of down, I was able to control a 600 sq ft main with only 3-part tackles. On a conventional rig you would need a powerful kicker to get the same effect.

    When close hauled I used the weather sheet and broad off I switched to the leeward sheet.

    Gybing in strong winds was done by winching in on one sheet and easing the other so the boom was unable to swing and do damage.
    One hull good, two hulls better.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    A Member State of the European Union
    Posts
    7,641

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Quote Originally Posted by snowleopard View Post
    I went for this arrangement on Snow Leopard. One key factor was that with the solid boom arrangement there was no need for a downward pull to flatten the sail so it only needed enough power to rotate the boom. By setting the sheeting points well apart so they were always pulling sideways instead of down, I was able to control a 600 sq ft main with only 3-part tackles. On a conventional rig you would need a powerful kicker to get the same effect.

    When close hauled I used the weather sheet and broad off I switched to the leeward sheet.

    Gybing in strong winds was done by winching in on one sheet and easing the other so the boom was unable to swing and do damage.
    That's very a interesting explanation. I can see the advantages of the system now.

    Did you find it slow in operation, especially when short-tacking in a narrow channel?
    "Brexit: like watching a library being burned down by people who can't read"

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    10,457

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Quote Originally Posted by snowleopard View Post
    I went for this arrangement on Snow Leopard. One key factor was that with the solid boom arrangement there was no need for a downward pull to flatten the sail so it only needed enough power to rotate the boom. By setting the sheeting points well apart so they were always pulling sideways instead of down, I was able to control a 600 sq ft main with only 3-part tackles. On a conventional rig you would need a powerful kicker to get the same effect.

    When close hauled I used the weather sheet and broad off I switched to the leeward sheet.

    Gybing in strong winds was done by winching in on one sheet and easing the other so the boom was unable to swing and do damage.
    Thank you. We have 510 sq ft with a 4:1 purchase and a 42:1 winch. Since I have a pair of 4:1 tackles available I’ll give this a try, because to be honest the mainsheet winch only gets used to harden the sail down.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Me - Zumerzet Boat - Wareham
    Posts
    12,407

    Default Re: Mainsheet doubling

    Quote Originally Posted by De.windhoos View Post
    Do you have a drawing/photo of your traveler setup? Sounds interesting.
    I will take a photo at the weekend.
    MontyMariner.co.uk
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