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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    81

    Default Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    Hello all,

    As you may know, my idea is to go solo sailing on a pretty tight budget. I'm still in two minds about boat size, but favour smaller for financial reasons (small but solid, Vegas, Victorias, Sadlers, etc).

    As discussed in detail in another thread, I'm very anxious about biting off more than I can chew, financially speaking. Better to sail a 26ft than have to go to work to keep a 32+ in the marina etc.

    At my marina, to berth a 26ft monohull, it is 2,500 approx, a 32 comes in at 3,400. Maths isn't my strong point, but I think a 32ft Sadler is 23% larger than a 26, but I'd be paying the marina over 40% more money for that 20% extra space.

    I know at sea that a 32 obviously has a lot of benefits over a 26, speed, stowage, etc but 40% is quite a price to pay. A thousand quid isn't much to some, but to me it's a three week cycling holiday somewhere warm etc.

    My question being, would that 40% be pretty representative of not only long-term mooring, but night rates, maintenance, labour, lift outs, and replacement parts; sails, rigging, etc?

    Cheers!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East coast UK. Mostly. Sometimes the Philippines
    Posts
    10,457

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    I may be in a minority but I think much more depends on where you are going to keep the boat, what you are going to have done to her by other people, and so on.

    The one that is really shattering is the cost of sails and covers because the costs of these (and paint) rise as the square of the length.


    If thinking of marina bills, nothing is likely to be less than six metres, but you get an awful lot more boat at 12 metres and an awful lot more at 18 metres.

    Another way of looking at it is that speed on passage increases in a fairly linear way but comfort below rises as the cube.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Greenwich
    Posts
    7,749

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    I’ve owned a 24 footer and a 42 footer at the same time for 8 years.

    Biggest differences in cost are as stated sails and marina fees.

    The next biggest differences are based on how practical you are. If you can narrow down the costs to the parts alone then it’s not too bad - bigger boat parts are much more expensive but they are big enough not to be toys that can corrode or break easily so you shouldn’t have to buy them twice in your lifetime with the boat.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    River Itchen, Southampton
    Posts
    7,353

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    Quote Originally Posted by ross84 View Post
    Hello all,

    As you may know, my idea is to go solo sailing on a pretty tight budget. I'm still in two minds about boat size, but favour smaller for financial reasons (small but solid, Vegas, Victorias, Sadlers, etc).

    As discussed in detail in another thread, I'm very anxious about biting off more than I can chew, financially speaking. Better to sail a 26ft than have to go to work to keep a 32+ in the marina etc.

    At my marina, to berth a 26ft monohull, it is 2,500 approx, a 32 comes in at 3,400. Maths isn't my strong point, but I think a 32ft Sadler is 23% larger than a 26, but I'd be paying the marina over 40% more money for that 20% extra space.

    I know at sea that a 32 obviously has a lot of benefits over a 26, speed, stowage, etc but 40% is quite a price to pay. A thousand quid isn't much to some, but to me it's a three week cycling holiday somewhere warm etc.

    My question being, would that 40% be pretty representative of not only long-term mooring, but night rates, maintenance, labour, lift outs, and replacement parts; sails, rigging, etc?

    Cheers!
    My rule of thumb is that total costs are closer to being proportional to boat displacement rather than boat length.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Me Edinburgh, boat JWD
    Posts
    5,188

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    Mooring prices are similar, certainly not 900 different and anchoring, in the sane parts of the country, is free for both.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    39,131

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    Many things cost the same.
    Looking at the things we've renewed, loos, VHFs, berth cushions, tenders, outboards, nav lights, cookers etc etc cost a lot and cost the same whatever boat they're going on.
    However many batteries and solar panels you need to support your lifestyle cost the same.

    Some stuff however has big jumps. As you go above certain sizes, you may find the cost escalates. There is more choice and a bigger market for smaller boats in some things.
    Smaller boats, many of the blocks are more or less dinghy fittings, going up a size can more than double the cost.
    Small boats can often use much cheaper places for haul out and storage.

    OTOH, it is often true, in my experience, that smaller boats break things and wear them out far more than bigger boats doing the same sort of trips.
    Depending on what you have in mind, a bigger boat may be viable to spend more nights at anchor and save on visitors' moorings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Wales and Bristol Channel, UK
    Posts
    2,567

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    I don't think there is a difference in maintenance costs between 26ft and 32ft boats. The only real difference is the mooring costs due to the length.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    108

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    The cost of boat ownership is directly related to its size.
    Similar to boat speed , boat length squared multiplied by a factor.
    Probably length in meters squared times 70 is close for a sterling figure.
    This will also be close to 10 percent of value, if you are running a good boat in good condition.

    The whole equation can be turned on its head , if you have a fixed budget per annum, find a boat on ten times this and you should be able to make ends meet.

    The problem is where you keep the boat, the better the location the more you pay. Take the above figure and either half or double. It will give you Grimsby or Grimod as an option or may be English Harbour and Lowestoft. North Sea against the Med or Caribbean, you pays your money and you take your choice.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    3,295

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    I have a 20 footer now, but did have a 44 footer in the past. My experience is that the running costs of the smaller boat are far greater as a proportion of the boats value. Just 3 years in a Marina would be more than the boat value (it is a 10 year old Jeanneau, not some MAB). I think the ratio would look just as bad if it was relative to boat volume/displacement. The big win is the ease of use, lack of maintenance etc. And that is why I stick with a smaller boat.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Home - Sothampton, Boat - Gosport
    Posts
    10,694

    Default Re: Associated Costs of Ownership relative to Boat Length?

    Comfort and space go up with the cube of the boat length, but so does the amount of fettling needed to single hand. When my 24 footer has a strop coming alongside, I heave on a line and she shapes up. My friend's 38 footer laughs and pulls back. Forces when handling sails are very different, too. That isn't to say it can't be done but, IMO, there are big advantages to a smaller boat when single handing.

    If you're on a tight budget, I'd forget about marinas unless you're planning on living aboard. You can get a year's mooring, plus a new dinghy and outboard for the price of a year in a marina. Join a club with a pontoon and you've got somewhere to work on the boat, people who'll give you a hand and, most likely, a cheap bar, and you may even be able to get a club mooring for next to nothing.
    Steve
    Never believe anything until it has been officially denied.

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