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  1. #1
    BlueSkyNick is offline Registered User
    Location : Near a marina, sailing club and pub
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    Default Life lines and jack stays

    I am a strong believer in the first rule of Man Over Board, ie Don't Go Over.

    So I am happy to clip on if necessary, particularly if only SWMBO is on board with me.

    I often wonder what would actually happen if I went over and was held up by my life line. In particular, if I go to the foredeck for some reason, I clip on to the jackstay before leaving the cockpit and make my way up the side deck.

    Suppose we hit an unexpected wave, I lose my grip, trip over a sheet or whatever and fall over the guard rail. The boat is now sailing along, possibly on autopilot, with me being dragged along, and getting dunked uncontrollably.

    So what should happen next? How would the crew get me back on board?

    Anybody done it for real?
    was BIGNICK, SkyTalk, MoodyNick in the past.

  2. #2
    Talbot's Avatar
    Talbot is offline Registered User
    Location : Stavanger, Norway
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    Default Re: Life lines and jack stays

    good reason for having the jackstay down the centre of the boat, rather than right on the side. I have mine rigged so that I can actually use it as a handrail as well as the safety line.
    "Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors - and miss."
    Robert A Heinlein

  3. #3
    Wansworth is offline Registered User
    Location : SPAIN,Galicia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Talbot View Post
    good reason for having the jackstay down the centre of the boat, rather than right on the side. I have mine rigged so that I can actually use it as a handrail as well as the safety line.
    Saw that idea on a Albin Vega on youtube,,,good idea.Ireckon the zone around the sprayhood is fricky so on my boat I am looking at a grab rail over the hood....

  4. #4
    rib is offline Registered User
    Location : west country uk
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    agree with cornishman,if its to short for you to reach the water you dont have a problem

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grigri_%28climbing%29

    Solo if i do clip on it's with a climbing harness and one of these. Instantly adjustable so you never leave the boat.

  6. #6
    sailor211 is offline Registered User
    Location : Home Sunny Hertfordshire : Boat Lymington
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    Single handed nightmare!!

    With expensive autopilot, remote control in your pocket may allow you to go head to wind and stop

    With windvane a bit of string will do the same, if you can reach it

    If your total line length including slack in jack stay is correct you will keep your head well clear of water . Then one of the "rope" ladder device attached to the guardrails at the stern will give you a chance of getting back on board.

    The only guy I know who has been over could do little at 5 knots. Not even hang on for long. (remember to wear your gloves)

  7. #7
    Sgeir's Avatar
    Sgeir is offline Registered User
    Location : Loch Linnhe in the summer - Dallens Bay, Appin. Ashore at MRC, Loch Creran for this winter.
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    Default Re: Life lines and jack stays

    Unless the remaining crew are able to stop or de-power the vessel quickly, my guess is that you'll take in a lot of water. The thought of being dragged along at say six knots is not appealing and I think that there would be a real danger of the lungs filling with water.

    Getting people back on board? Aside from making an immediate call to the coastguard, difficult.

    We keep the mainsheet connected to the traveller and boom with two karabiners, the idea being that they can be quickly reversed (moving the mainsheet tail to come down from the boom), and lowered to a person in the water. If the person is conscious then, in theory, he/she could then clip on and be winched out on the mainsheet. Don't want to try it though.

    If we actually had crew (usually just the two of us), then perhaps the sun awning or a spare sail could be lowered in, but I could see that being very slow.
    Ω

  8. #8
    BlueSkyNick is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: Life lines and jack stays

    Thanks Sgeir,

    Your thougts echo my own. MOB recovery is a seperate subject in itself.

    I am wondering about the benefits of clipping on to the jackstays in the first place ...... as you say, the thought of being dragged along at 6 knots is not appealing.
    was BIGNICK, SkyTalk, MoodyNick in the past.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoodyNick View Post
    Thanks Sgeir,

    Your thougts echo my own. MOB recovery is a seperate subject in itself.

    I am wondering about the benefits of clipping on to the jackstays in the first place ...... as you say, the thought of being dragged along at 6 knots is not appealing.
    I raised the point a few months ago. Perhaps you need a secondary line to clip on which would let you drift back to the stern with a chance of getting to the boarding ladder.

    Perhaps one end could be tied to the tip of the tiller.... At least the boat wouldn't continue in a straight line.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Life lines and jack stays

    On last year's ARC one of a 2-man crew went over and was left hanging from his harness. The combined efforts of both men failed to get him back aboard and he had a heart attack and died.

    I have experimented with crew retrieval and settled on an 'Oscar' MOB sling which is designed to be towed to the casualty so you can reel him in. I keep a snatch block on the end of the boom through which I reeve the Oscar's line then use a halliard winch to lift the MOB aboard. It's not very comfortable for the casualty but it works.
    One hull good, two hulls better.

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