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  1. #11
    hlb's Avatar
    hlb is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    I've never got my head round the idea, that smells escape from pipes, but not air or water. I am aware of the smells, it just dont seem feasable? [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

  2. #12
    blueglass is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    I think it comes down to molecule size Haydn, but i know what you mean.
    Genuine Antique 17th - 19th century Sea Charts at www.lindisfarneprints.com

  3. #13
    hlb's Avatar
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    Why. How bigs a smell!! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]

  4. #14
    blueglass is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    clearly, smaller than air and water.
    Genuine Antique 17th - 19th century Sea Charts at www.lindisfarneprints.com

  5. #15
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    same reason roughly speaking why goretex won't let water through, but does let water vapour through

  6. #16
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    [ QUOTE ]

    One last thing - to make sure I don't get a recurring problem - the overriding element of the smell is I think from the powerful breakdown chemicals use as additives to holding tanks - brand leader over here is one called Elsan Blue.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Actually, it's not the chemicals, it's the gasses produced by the breakdown of sewage in the anaerobic environment inside the hoses. The best way to extend the odorless life of hoses (not even the very best last forever, though) is to ALWAYS run clean fresh water through 'em to rinse 'em out before the boat is to sit. A cupful of white vinegar through 'em once a week will also help to retard odor, while preventing sea water mineral buildup.

    "And another last thing - replacing the pipes leading up to the deck pumpout point looks like the worst one to get to- impossible from inside - how are these fittings attached to the deck? can I for example loosen it at the deck end, attach new pipe to old as suggested and pull it through?"

    Like all deck fittings, your pumpout fitting is secured with screws and then bedded. If there's NO other way to get to that end of the pumpout hose, you may or may not be able to remove it and pull it up to replace the hose, then screw it back down and rebed it. The only problem is the hose clamps: will they go through the hole in the deck? Most likely they won't. The only solution: loosen 'em and let 'em fall before pulling the hose out...make sure to put 'em back over the end of the new hose before you attach the hose to the deck fitting. Then you'll have the fun of trying to move 'em up and tighten 'em in a place you can't get to. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

    One caveat: make sure that the screws will still be a tight fit when you put the fitting back down...if not, fill the holes and drill new pilot holes.

    As for the question of why hoses soak up odor, but not waste or water...hoses do absorb SOME liquid, but not nearly at the same rate they absorb gasses. The thicker the hose wall, and the tighter the molecules in the hose material (which explains why more odor-resistant hoses are considerably stiffer than those that permeate easily), the slower either happens...conversely, the thinner and softer the hose, the faster the absorb both. Gasses make themselves known very easily...you'd need a highly sophisticated moisture meter to measure the rate of water or waste absorption.
    Peggie Hall
    Specializing in marine sanitation since 1987
    Author "Get Rid of Boat Odors"
    http://shop.sailboatowners.com/books...ku=90&cat=1304

  7. #17
    blueglass is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    .

    But just to be sure, wet some clean rags in HOT water...wring 'em out and wrap one around a section of each hose. When the rag has cooled, remove it and smell it. If you smell the same odor on the rag, that hose has permeated. If you CAN'T smell anything on the rags, the hoses haven't permeated.

    Peggie,
    Just back from the boat ( it's 250 miles away and don't get to it as often as I would like!) I have tried the wet rag test on 3 or 4 of the pipes and not a trace of the smell is transferred - I was really surprised.
    Am now thing of installing an extraction fan in the affected compartments, and spraying out with the microbial treatment you mentioned. What do you think? ( do you know any brand names or key active ingredients to check for?
    Thanks,
    Dave
    Genuine Antique 17th - 19th century Sea Charts at www.lindisfarneprints.com

  8. #18
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    Damn...I'd have bet money on the hoses! I wonder if they were replaced shortly before you bought the boat, resulting in a few little spills...that would cause your problem.

    If you were in the US, I could recommend a couple of microbial products by brand name...but I don't know what's available in the UK. Go to any pet supply store and ask for a microbial (specificy microbial only) odor remover for accident sites. Get the largest size. Put in a spray bottle (the pump garden spray bottles are dandy for this)...spray it EVERYWHERE odors are strongest immediately after opening up the boat. Just let it dry...keep all lockers and hatches open...turn a fan on if possible...for 24 hours.

    If THAT doesn't do it, we need to start looking for trapped water below the sole somewhere....'cuz trapped water left to sit and stagnate will smell like a sewer.

    Btw...I'm assuming that you've already cleaned the sumps? Wet dirty sumps can smell like a sewer too.
    Peggie Hall
    Specializing in marine sanitation since 1987
    Author "Get Rid of Boat Odors"
    http://shop.sailboatowners.com/books...ku=90&cat=1304

  9. #19
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    I know you checked the hoses - but what sort of hose is it?

    have seen many boats (incl mine) which use the clearish pvc with steel wire reinforcement.

    IF yours are this type, I'd change them anyway,even if they passed the rag test. certainly the ones we have/had are porous enogh to odour that they'll let it through v.quickly , yet once flushed through, the hose itself smells ok, leaving an odour in the area, seemingly not from the hoses.

    If you change them, avoid the cheap'ish stiff white hose sold in many chandlers for hard to reach areas - it can be the very devil to fit over spigots, even with heat,lubrication etc. Vetus stuff ,or any black liner'd hose, usually much easier to fit.

    Also, what material are the tanks made of?

  10. #20
    blueglass is offline Registered User
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    Default Re: a different smelly heads problem

    Tanks are stainless steel, with white plastic pipework, whole installation about 7 years old.
    Genuine Antique 17th - 19th century Sea Charts at www.lindisfarneprints.com

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