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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,325

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    It appears in the US version of the Colregs. The US version is almost, but not quite, verbatim other versions. The following statement is added to rule 30: g) A vessel of less than 20 meters in length, when at anchor in a special anchorage area designated by the Secretary, shall not be required to exhibit the anchor lights and shapes required by this Rule.
    So, it an exemption in US waters. Whew! I thought I was suffering memory loss.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    here are the untouched international rules for preventing collisions at sea

    http://www.boatsafe.com/nauticalknow...g/colregs.html
    at sea - boring is good, exciting is bad

  3. #13
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    OK, so this is peculiar to US territorial waters and does not apply to us here in the UK or Europe,

    Here in Europe all vessels, regardless of size, are required to show an all round white anchor light of defined brightness, from the masthead, when in an anchorage at night.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,325

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    Nearly, but not quite. Vessels over 50m show two lights, one in the forward part and a lower one in the aft part of the vessel. Vessels under this size can show a single all round light where it can best be seen. There is no reference to masthead. Many feel that a light in the foretriangle is more easily seen than a masthead light, and this is also my own opinion.
    Interesting also that if you are aground you need to show, in addition, two red lights in a vertical line, and the exemption for this is below only 12m. I wonder how many boats carry such lights?

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    9,176

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    [ QUOTE ]
    OK, so this is peculiar to US territorial waters and does not apply to us here in the UK or Europe,

    Here in Europe all vessels, regardless of size, are required to show an all round white anchor light of defined brightness, from the masthead, when in an anchorage at night.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Rule 30

    Anchored Vessels and Vessels Aground

    (a) A vessel at anchor shall exhibit where it can best be seen:

    (i) in the fore part, an all-round white light or one ball;

    (ii) at or near the stern and at a lower level than the light prescribed in subparagraph (i), an all-round white light.

    (b) A vessel of less than 50 meters in length may exhibit an all-round white light where it can best be seen instead of the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this Rule.

    (c) A vessel at anchor may, and a vessel of 100 meters and more in length shall, also use the available working or equivalent lights to illuminate her decks.

    (d) A vessel aground shall exhibit the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) or (b) of this Rule and in addition, where they can best be seen;

    (i) two all-round red lights in a vertical line;

    (ii) three balls in a vertical line.

    (e) A vessel of less than 7 meters in length, when at anchor not in or near a narrow channel, fairway or where other vessels normally navigate, shall not be required to exhibit the shape prescribed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this Rule.

    (f) A vessel of less than 12 meters in length, when aground, shall not be required to exhibit the lights or shapes prescribed in subparagraphs (d)(i) and (ii) of this Rule.


    Nowhere does it say the anchor light shall be on the masthead, indeed the mast head can in many circumstances be the worst place to put one as it gets lost amongst shore lights or occasionally the stars.
    --------------------
    "Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity"
    Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity

  6. #16

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    You're right. However I've been in situations where I've felt that because the shore lights were low and distant it was better to use the masthead light. Normally I prefer to use a light in the rigging simply because mine has a photocell and I don't need to get up early to switch off!

  7. #17
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    Firstly, I don't understand why you want to widen this discussion to ships greater than 50m - it is irrelevant to this forum. We could also extend the discussion to the rules for ships greater than 100m - but leave me out!

    [ QUOTE ]
    Vessels under this size can show a single all round light where it can best be seen. There is no reference to masthead.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    No, not so. You need to read all of the colregs as the lights are defined in other rules.

    Rule 22 - 'Visibility of Lights'

    The lights prescribed in these Rules shall have an intensity as specifies in section 8 of Annex I to these Regulations so as to be visible at the following minimum ranges:

    (a) In vessels of 50 metres or more in length:

    - a masthead light, 6 miles;
    - a sidelight, 3 miles;
    - a sternlight, 3 miles;
    - a towing light, 3 miles;
    - a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, 3 miles.

    (b) In vessels of 12 metres or more in length but less than 50 metres in length:

    - a masthead light, 5 miles; except that where the length of the vessel is less than 20 metres, 3 miles;
    - a sidelight, 2 miles;
    - a sternlight, 2 miles;
    - a towing light, 2 miles;
    - a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, 2 miles.

    (c) In vessels of less than 12 metres in length:

    - a masthead light, 2 miles;
    - a sidelight, 1 mile;
    - a sternlight, 2 miles;
    - a towing light, 2 miles;
    - a white, red, green or yellow all-round light, 2 miles

    [ QUOTE ]
    Many feel that a light in the foretriangle is more easily seen than a masthead light, and this is also my own opinion.

    [/ QUOTE ]I don't agree. I find that lights at low level are much harder to see as you confuse them with shore lights and the living lights of other vessels. Masthead lights really are clearer, even close up. But what the heck?....the rules require a masthead light with a visibility of 2nm (up to 20m). The statement that "A vessel at anchor shall exhibit where it can best be seen:.." refers to ships and in any case is qualified further on in the rule.

  8. #18

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    Actually, an all round light (of which an anchor light is one) only has to be visible over a 354 degree arc. Furthermore, if the all round light is an anchor light it can be more obscured than this if it would otherwise mean showing it at an unreasonable height.

    In one of the Annexes - forgotten which one.

    {Edit - to save others a bother I have checked - tis in Annex I, Horizontal Sectors which sets out the legal requirements for lights. But wording is actually "impractical" height, not "unreasonable" height as I recalled}

    John
    <span style="color:blue">www.sailroom.co.uk</span>

  9. #19

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    Without wading through the Col Regs I am wondering if there is some confusion here between a steaming light and an anchor light which is mounted at the masthead?

    I've always understood that a foretriangle light was the "correct" one. (I've put "correct" in quotes because I can't help but think that the correct one really is the one which is most visible, wherever it is!)

  10. #20
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Re: Anchor lights - risks of not showing correct lights

    [ QUOTE ]
    Without wading through the Col Regs I am wondering if there is some confusion here between a steaming light and an anchor light which is mounted at the masthead?

    [/ QUOTE ]Yes, I think you're right about that, here is the actual rule 21...

    (a) "Masthead light" means a white light placed over the fore and aft centreline of the vessel showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 225 degrees and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to 225 degrees abaft the beam on either side of the vessel.

    (b) "Sidelights" means a green light on the starboard side and a red light on the port side each showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 112.5 degrees and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to 22.5 degrees abaft the beam on its respective side. In a vessel of less than 20 metres in length the sidelights may be combined in one lantern carried on the fore and aft centreline of the vessel.

    (c) "Sternlight" means a white light placed as nearly as practicable at the stern showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 135 degree and so fixed as to show the light 67.5 degrees from right aft on each side of the vessel.

    (d) "Towing light" means a yellow light having the same characteristics as the "sternlight" defined in paragraph (c) of this Rule.

    (e) "All-round light" means a light showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360 degrees.

    (f) "Flashing light" means a light flashing at regular intervals at a frequencies of 120 flashes or more per minute.

    There is no doubt that the all-round white arc is allowed to be broken when it is not practicable to do otherwise, but what is more practicable that a light at the top of the mast - which is not surprisingly where the boat builders put them on sailing boats.

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